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Lecture Comments (20)

0 answers

Post by aimun amatul-hayee on March 2, 2015

what is the charge of the transition metals?

0 answers

Post by sadia sarwar on November 15, 2014

why is N2 alone nitrogen when S4N2 is tetrasulfur dinitride?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Jan 8, 2014 12:06 AM

Post by Yisrael Harris on January 2, 2014

Questions about polyatomic ions:

1. Is there a name for the ionic compounds formed from polyatomic ions?
2. Such compounds are not binary compounds, are they?
3. I notice that most of the polyatomic ions on your list contain O. Do most polyatomic ions contain O?
4. Are there many other polyatomic ions besides the ones in your list?
5. Are there properties which make certain covalent compounds more likely than others to become polyatomic ions?
6. I notice that all the polyatomic ions on your list except ammonium are -ve. Are most polyatomic ions -ve?
7. I believe that the ionic compounds formed from polyatomic ions are not named exactly like other ionic compounds: the rule of changing the ending of negative ion to "-ide" doesn't seem to apply when the negative ion is a polyatomic ion.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Apr 24, 2013 11:25 AM

Post by Yisrael Harris on April 23, 2013

When ionic bonds form, what is it that causes the metal to lose the electron(s)? Is it the non-metal pulling that electron away? In other words, is the non-metal the direct cause of the metal losing its electron, or does the metal lose its electron independently of the non-metal, and then the non-metal takes that free electron?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Apr 24, 2013 11:22 AM

Post by CeCe Tang on March 24, 2013

On your periodic table, why is Group 13,2A? Shouldn't it be 3A?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:49 PM

Post by Doreen Wagner on February 22, 2013

5. Example IV Lead (IV) oxide:
she wrote PbO4, but should it be Pb2O4, because Pb has a 4-/+and O is 2- charged.


1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:44 PM

Post by Doreen Wagner on February 22, 2013

4. On Example III polyatomic compounds:
she wrote calcium phosphate as Ca(PO4)2, but wouldn't it actually be Ca3(PO4)2, because PO4 has a -3 charge and Ca has a 2+charge.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:00 PM

Post by Doreen Wagner on February 22, 2013

3.same example: Disulfur dichloride... if you have S, your dot diagram would have 6 electrons in the dot diagram (so 2 empty spaces), then Cl would have 7 electrons in the dot diagram, and they would each have 1 electron to share. If S has 2 empty spaces for electrons, I can see that 2 Cl could have room to bond, but I don't see that you need another Sulfur, so how does it fit in to become Disulfur? Also, if S has a 2- charge and Cl has 1- charge, wouldn't the final chemical formula be SCl2?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Fri Feb 22, 2013 5:02 PM

Post by Doreen Wagner on February 22, 2013

2. same example 2 (covalent compounds): Hexaboron monosilicide: B6Si... so if I do dot diagrams for Si and attach B so they share an electron, I can only attach 4 B, not 6. How would 6 Boron bond when Si has only 4 electrons to share?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Fri Feb 22, 2013 4:30 PM

Post by Doreen Wagner on February 22, 2013

on Example 2, Covalent Compounds:
on the Iodine pentafluoride question, why isn't it Pentafluorine iodide because the rule says: "the element with the lower group # goes 1st in the name. If they are in the same group, the element with the higher period # goes 1st." (so, it's like reading... Left to right, top to bottom. or am I wrong on this...

because Fluorine is in period 2 and iodine is in period 5, would we say fluorine first, then iodine?

Also, since they are in the same group, wouldn't you have an overall charge of 6-, since you have 5 of the F (with 1- each) and 1 of I (with 1- each) so an overall charge of 6- ?
I'm confused on that...

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Thu Nov 29, 2012 3:47 PM

Post by Nathanael Shim on November 28, 2012

So gas is not a compound right?

Related Articles:

Chemical Bonding, Part 2

  • A binary compound is a compound made up of 2 elements.
  • Binary compounds can be ionic or covalent.
  • To name ionic compounds, write the name of the positive ion first; change the ending of the negative ion to –ide.
  • Ionic compounds must be neutral. The number of atoms in the formula (written as subscript) must be written so that the charges are balanced.
  • A covalently bonded group of atoms can lose or gain electrons to become a polyatomic ion.
  • Polyatomic ions have special names, but the ionic compounds that they form are named and written just like other ionic compounds.
  • You can use a numerical prefix for each type of element in a covalent compound, but you do not need to use mono for one. If there is no prefix, that means there is only one atom of that type of element.
  • Some transition metals have more than one oxidation number. When you write these names, you must use roman numerals to express which of the two oxidation numbers are being used.

Chemical Bonding, Part 2

When naming ionic compounds, the name of which ion goes first?
The positive ion is first
What is the name of the ionic compound that forms when Hydrogen (with an oxidation number of 1+) and Chlorine (with an oxidation number of 1-) bond?
Hydrogen chloride
What is the chemical formula of Magnesium Bromide? (Mg2+ and Br1−)
MgBr2
What is the name of an ion that is made up of more than one atom?
A polyatomic ion
What is the chemical formula for Magnesium Hydroxide (Mg2+ and OH1−)?
Mg(OH)2
What type of compound is diarsenic pentoxide? How do you know?
A covalent compound this is a bond between a metalloid and a nonmetal so it is covalent and the numerical prefixes are included in the names, which is another indication that it is a covalent compound.
What type of compound is copper (II) carbonate? How do you know?
An ionic compound Copper is a metal and carbon is a nonmetal, copper (II) has an oxidation number of 2+ and carbonate is a polyatomic ion with an oxidation number of 2-
What is the chemical formula for phosphorus trihydride?
PH3
What type of compounds are solids at room temperature and form when electrons are gained or lost?
Ionic compounds
What is the name for a compound that is made up of only two elements?
Binary compound

*These practice questions are only helpful when you work on them offline on a piece of paper and then use the solution steps function to check your answer.

Answer

Chemical Bonding, Part 2

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Bonding Atoms Make Compounds 0:05
    • Binary Compounds
    • Reviwew: Oxidation Number
  • Naming Ionic Compounds 1:45
    • Naming Ionic Compounds
    • NaCl
    • MgCl2
    • Al2S3
  • Writing Formulas of Ionic Compounds 10:03
    • Writing Formulas of Ionic Compounds
    • Beryllium Fluoride
    • Lithium Nitride
    • Calcium Bromide
  • Polyatomic Ions 15:31
    • Polyatomic Ions
    • Ammonium Phosphate
    • Aluminum Hydroxide
    • Magnesium Chlorate
    • NaOH
    • (NH4)2O
    • Mg(NO3)2
  • Special Ions 23:28
    • Iron (III) Iodide
    • Lead (IV) Chloride
    • Chromium (III) Oxide
    • Fe3P2
    • CuI2
    • PbBr2
  • Naming Covalent Compounds 33:57
    • Naming Covalent Compounds
    • Examples
  • Ionic or Covalent? 39:50
    • Ionic vs. Covalent: Electron
    • Ionic vs. Covalent: State At Room Temperature
    • Ionic vs. Covalent: Metal, Nonmetal, Metalloids
    • Ionic vs. Covalent: Naming
  • Example 1: Write the Names or Formulas for Each Ionic Compound 42:50
  • Example 2: Write the Names or Formulas for Each Covalent Compound 46:13
  • Example 3: Name the Following Ionic Compounds 49:44
  • Example 4: Provide the Formulas for the Following Ionic Compounds 52:19
  • Example 5: Ionic or Covalent? 54:21