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For more information, please see full course syllabus of Physical Science
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Lecture Comments (13)

0 answers

Post by Labiche Ferreira on June 6, 2014

can ionic bonds happen ONLY between metal and nonmetal things?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Jan 8, 2014 12:13 AM

Post by Yisrael Harris on December 30, 2013

In example iv, polar or nonpolar, you indicated that H2O is polar, and you drew the molecule with a roughly 45 degree angle between the two H's. But why doesn't the molecule form with a 180 degree angle between them, in which case it would be nonpolar?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Jan 8, 2014 12:13 AM

Post by Yisrael Harris on December 30, 2013

Not a question. I just want to say that Summer is a fantastic presenter, and I enjoyed her series enormously.

0 answers

Post by Yisrael Harris on December 30, 2013

Why in CH4 does the H come after the C, while in H2O, the H comes before the O?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:01 AM

Post by Yisrael Harris on April 22, 2013

When you discussed fluorine and hydrogen sharing the electron, I believe that should have been electrons, plural.

0 answers

Post by jordan lypchuk on February 1, 2013

yes... water is a compound

1 answer

Last reply by: Yisrael Harris
Mon Apr 22, 2013 12:38 AM

Post by Brian Thompson on December 10, 2012

Chemical Bonding, Part I seams to have issue--I get about a minute into dot diagrams and it cuts off--?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Thu Nov 1, 2012 7:43 PM

Post by isaac gomez on October 28, 2012

so water is a compound?

Related Articles:

Chemical Bonding, Part I

  • In a chemical formula, the number of atoms of an element is written in subscript (below) just after the element symbol like the 2 hydrogen atoms in H2O.
  • If there is only 1 atom of the element, you DO NOT write the number 1.
  • Atoms will gain, lose or share electrons to fill their outer energy levels and become stable
  • The interaction of electrons between atoms (sharing, losing, gaining) creates an attraction which holds atoms together in a chemical bond
  • When electrons are gained or lost (transferred), and resulting ions are held together by attractive forces, an ionic bond forms
  • When electrons are shared, a covalent bond forms
  • Covalent bonds can be single bonds (between 1 pair of electrons), double bonds (between 2 pairs of electrons) or triple bonds (between 3 pairs of electrons)
  • Covalent bonds form between nonmetallic elements
  • Ionic bonds form between a metal and a nonmetal
  • Ionic compounds have a neutral charge; oxidation numbers must cancel each other out
  • Giving up an electron makes an atom a positive ion
  • Gaining an electron makes an atom a negative ion
  • Polar molecules form when covalently bonded atoms share the electron unequally
  • Unequal sharing of electrons occurs between elements with different electronegativities

    Molecules made from two identical elements or that are symmetric will be nonpolar

Chemical Bonding, Part I

How many Calcium atoms and how many Chlorine atoms are in the compound, CaCl2?
1 atom of calcium and 2 atoms of chlorine
What force holds atoms together in a chemical bond?
The interaction of electrons
What type of bond forms between two oppositely charged atoms?
An ionic bond
What type of bond forms between a metal and a nonmetal?
An ionic bond
How many total electrons are involved in a double covalent bond?
4 electrons (2 electron pairs)
Two nonmetals, Carbon and Oxygen will bond by sharing electrons. What type of bond will they make?
A covalent bond
When two atoms form a covalent bond but they do not share the electrons equally, what type of covalent bond is formed?
A polar covalent bond
How many atoms of each element are in the compound, Ca3(PO4)2?
3 calcium atoms, 2 phosphate atoms, and 8 oxygen atoms]
Where are the most electronegative elements found on the periodic table?
In the upper, right corner, excluding the noble gases found in group 18
Why are the noble gases the least likely elements to form compounds?
Noble gases have full outer electron levels causing them to be stable so they do not need to gain, lose, or share electrons.

*These practice questions are only helpful when you work on them offline on a piece of paper and then use the solution steps function to check your answer.

Answer

Chemical Bonding, Part I

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Chemical Bonds Form Compounds 0:17
    • Atoms and Electrons
    • H2O
    • HCl
    • C6H12O6
    • Ca(NO3)2
    • Review: Dot Diagrams
    • Review: Ion Formation
  • Ionic Bond 9:57
    • Ionic Bond
    • Sodium and Fluorine
    • Magnesium and Chlorine
  • Covalent Bond 22:19
    • Covalent Bond
    • Hydrogen and Carbon
    • Hydrogen and Oxygen
  • Multiple Covalent Bonds 29:03
    • Single Covalent Bond
    • Double Covalent Bond
    • Triple Covalent Bond
  • Polar and Nonpolar Molecules 33:33
    • Polar Molecules
    • Unequal sharing of Electrons and Electronegativities
    • Nonpolar Molecules
  • Example 1: Elements and Atoms 38:42
  • Example 2: Dot Diagram of the Bond That Forms Between Magnesium and Oxygen 41:17
  • Example 3: Dot Diagram of the Bond That Forms Between Nitrogen and Oxygen 45:24
  • Example 4: Polar or Nonpolar? 47:22