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Join Professor Dan Fullerton in his AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism online course. Dan takes his experience teaching the high school AP course to explain difficult concepts using clear descriptions and tons of step-by-step examples. He finishes the class with a full AP exam walkthrough complete with insights and strategies to help you get that 5.

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I. Electricity

  Electric Charge & Coulomb's Law 30:48
   Intro 0:00 
   Objective 0:15 
   Electric Charges 0:50 
    Matter is Made Up of Atoms 0:52 
    Most Atoms are Neutral 1:02 
    Ions 1:11 
    Coulomb 1:18 
    Elementary Charge 1:34 
    Law of Conservation of Charge 2:03 
   Example 1 2:39 
   Example 2 3:42 
   Conductors and Insulators 4:41 
    Conductors Allow Electric Charges to Move Freely 4:43 
    Insulators Do Not Allow Electric Charges to Move Freely 4:50 
    Resistivity 4:58 
   Charging by Conduction 5:32 
    Conduction 5:37 
    Balloon Example 5:40 
    Charged Conductor 6:14 
   Example 3 6:28 
   The Electroscope 7:16 
   Charging by Induction 7:57 
    Bring Positive Rod Near Electroscope 8:08 
    Ground the Electroscope 8:27 
    Sever Ground Path and Remove Positive Rod 9:07 
   Example 4 9:39 
   Polarization and Electric Dipole Moment 11:46 
    Polarization 11:54 
    Electric Dipole Moment 12:05 
   Coulomb's Law 12:38 
    Electrostatic Force, Also Known as Coulombic Force 12:48 
    How Force of Attraction or Repulsion Determined 12:55 
    Formula 13:08 
   Coulomb's Law: Vector Form 14:18 
   Example 5 16:05 
   Example 6 18:25 
   Example 7 19:14 
   Example 8 23:21 
  Electric Fields 1:19:22
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:09 
   Electric Fields 1:33 
    Property of Space That Allows a Charged Object to Feel a Force 1:40 
    Detect the Presence of an Electric Field 1:51 
    Electric Field Strength Vector 2:03 
    Direction of the Electric Field Vector 2:21 
   Example 1 3:00 
   Visualizing the Electric Field 4:13 
   Electric Field Lines 4:56 
   E Field Due to a Point Charge 7:19 
    Derived from the Definition of the Electric Field and Coulomb's Law 7:24 
    Finding the Electric Field Due to Multiple Point Charges 8:37 
   Comparing Electricity to Gravity 8:51 
    Force 8:54 
    Field Strength 9:09 
    Constant 9:19 
    Charge Units vs. Mass Units 9:35 
    Attracts vs. Repel 9:44 
   Example 2 10:06 
   Example 3 17:25 
   Example 4 24:29 
   Example 5 25:23 
   Charge Densities 26:09 
    Linear Charge Density 26:26 
    Surface Charge Density 26:30 
    Volume Charge Density 26:47 
   Example 6 27:26 
   Example 7 37:07 
   Example 8 50:13 
   Example 9 54:01 
   Example 10 63:10 
   Example 11 73:58 
  Gauss's Law 52:53
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:07 
   Electric Flux 1:16 
    Amount of Electric Field Penetrating a Surface 1:19 
    Symbol 1:23 
   Point Charge Inside a Hollow Sphere 4:31 
    Place a Point Charge Inside a Hollow Sphere of Radius R 4:39 
    Determine the Flux Through the Sphere 5:09 
    Gauss's Law 8:39 
    Total Flux 8:59 
   Gauss's Law 9:10 
   Example 1 9:53 
   Example 2 17:28 
   Example 3 22:37 
   Example 4 25:40 
   Example 5 30:49 
   Example 6 45:06 
  Electric Potential & Electric Potential Energy 1:14:03
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Electric Potential Energy 0:58 
    Gravitational Potential Energy 1:02 
    Electric Potential Energy 1:11 
    Electric Potential 1:19 
   Example 1 1:59 
   Example 2 3:08 
   The Electron-Volt 4:02 
    Electronvolt 4:16 
    1 eV is the Amount of Work Done in Moving an Elementary Charge Through a Potential Difference of 1 Volt 4:26 
    Conversion Ratio 4:41 
   Example 3 4:52 
   Equipotential Lines 5:35 
    Topographic Maps 5:36 
    Lines Connecting Points of Equal Electrical Potential 5:47 
    Always Cross Electrical Field Lines at Right Angles 5:57 
    Gradient of Potential Increases As Equipotential Lines Get Closer 6:02 
    Electric Field Points from High to Low Potential 6:27 
   Drawing Equipotential Lines 6:49 
   E Potential Energy Due to a Point Charge 8:20 
   Electric Force from Electric Potential Energy 11:59 
   E Potential Due to a Point Charge 13:07 
   Example 4 14:42 
   Example 5 15:59 
   Finding Electric Field From Electric Potential 19:06 
   Example 6 23:41 
   Example 7 25:08 
   Example 8 26:33 
   Example 9 29:01 
   Example 10 31:26 
   Example 11 43:23 
   Example 12 51:51 
   Example 13 58:12 
  Electric Potential Due to Continuous Charge Distributions 1:01:28
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:10 
   Potential Due to a Charged Ring 0:27 
   Potential Due to a Uniformly Charged Desk 3:38 
   Potential Due to a Spherical Shell of Charge 11:21 
   Potential Due to a Uniform Solid Sphere 14:50 
   Example 1 23:08 
   Example 2 30:43 
   Example 3 41:58 
   Example 4 51:41 
  Conductors 20:35
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Charges in a Conductor 0:32 
    Charge is Free to Move Until the 0:36 
    All Charge Resides at Surface 2:18 
    Field Lines are Perpendicular to Surface 2:34 
   Electric Field at the Surface of a Conductor 3:04 
    Looking at Just the Outer Surface 3:08 
    Large Electric Field Where You Have the Largest Charge Density 3:59 
   Hollow Conductors 4:22 
    Draw Hollow Conductor and Gaussian Surface 4:36 
    Applying Gaussian Law 4:53 
    Any Hollow Conductor Has Zero Electric Field in Its Interior 5:24 
    Faraday Cage 5:35 
   Electric Field and Potential Due to a Conducting Sphere 6:03 
   Example 1 7:31 
   Example 2 12:39 
  Capacitors 41:23
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   What is a Capacitor? 0:42 
    Electric Device Used to Store Electrical Energy 0:44 
    Place Opposite Charges on Each Plate 1:10 
    Develop a Potential Difference Across the Plates 1:14 
    Energy is Stored in the Electric Field Between the Plates 1:17 
   Capacitance 1:22 
    Ratio of the Charge Separated on the Plates of a Capacitor to the Potential Difference Between the Plates 1:25 
    Units of Capacitance 1:32 
    Farad 1:37 
    Formula 1:52 
   Calculating Capacitance 1:59 
    Assume Charge on Each Conductor 2:05 
    Find the Electric Field 2:11 
    Calculate V by Integrating the Electric Field 2:21 
    Utilize C=Q/V to Solve for Capitance 2:33 
   Example 1 2:44 
   Example 2 5:30 
   Example 3 10:46 
   Energy Stored in a Capacitor 15:25 
    Work is Done Charging a Capacitor 15:28 
    Solve For That 15:55 
   Field Energy Density 18:09 
    Amount of Energy Stored Between the Plates of a Capacitor 18:11 
    Example 18:25 
   Dielectrics 20:44 
    Insulating Materials Place Between Plates of Capacitor to Increase The Devices' Capacitance 20:47 
    Electric Field is Weakened 21:00 
    The Greater the Amount of Polarization The Greater the Reduction in Electric Field Strength 21:58 
   Dielectric Constant (K) 22:30 
    Formula 23:00 
    Net Electric Field 23:35 
    Key Take Away Point 23:50 
   Example 4 24:00 
   Example 5 25:50 
   Example 6 26:50 
   Example 7 28:53 
   Example 8 30:57 
   Example 9 32:55 
   Example 10 34:59 
   Example 11 37:35 
   Example 12 39:57 

II. Current Electricity

  Current & Resistance 17:59
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Electric Current 0:44 
    Flow Rate of Electric Charge 0:45 
    Amperes 0:49 
    Positive Current Flow 1:01 
    Current Formula 1:19 
   Drift Velocity 1:35 
    Constant Thermal Motion 1:39 
    Net Electron Flow 1:43 
    When Electric Field is Applied 1:49 
    Electron Drift Velocity 1:55 
   Derivation of Current Flow 2:12 
    Apply Electric Field E 2:20 
    Define N as the Volume Density of Charge Carriers 2:27 
   Current Density 4:33 
    Current Per Area 4:36 
    Formula 4:44 
   Resistance 5:14 
    Ratio of the Potential Drop Across an Object to the Current Flowing Through the Object 5:19 
    Ohmic Materials Follow Ohm's Law 5:23 
   Resistance of a Wire 6:05 
    Depends on Resistivity 6:09 
    Resistivity Relates to the Ability of a Material to Resist the Flow of Electrons 6:25 
   Refining Ohm's Law 7:22 
   Conversion of Electric Energy to Thermal Energy 8:23 
   Example 1 9:54 
   Example 2 10:54 
   Example 3 11:26 
   Example 4 14:41 
   Example 5 15:24 
  Circuits I: Series Circuits 29:08
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Ohm's Law Revisited 0:39 
    Relates Resistance, Potential Difference, and Current Flow 0:39 
    Formula 0:44 
   Example 1 1:09 
   Example 2 1:44 
   Example 3 2:15 
   Example 4 2:56 
   Electrical Power 3:26 
    Transfer of Energy Into Different Types 3:28 
    Light Bulb 3:37 
    Television 3:41 
   Example 5 3:49 
   Example 6 4:27 
   Example 7 5:12 
   Electrical Circuits 5:42 
    Closed-Loop Path Which Current Can Flow 5:43 
    Typically Comprised of Electrical Devices 5:52 
    Conventional Current Flows from High Potential to Low Potential 6:04 
   Circuit Schematics 6:26 
    Three-dimensional Electrical Circuits 6:37 
    Source of Potential Difference Required for Current to Flow 7:29 
   Complete Conducting Paths 7:42 
    Current Only Flows in Complete Paths 7:43 
    Left Image 7:46 
    Right Image 7:56 
   Voltmeters 8:25 
    Measure the Potential Difference Between Two Points in a Circuit 8:29 
    Can Remove Voltmeter from Circuit Without Breaking the Circuit 8:47 
    Very High Resistance 8:53 
   Ammeters 9:31 
    Measure the Current Flowing Through an Element of a Circuit 9:32 
    Very Low Resistance 9:46 
    Put Ammeter in Correctly 10:00 
   Example 8 10:24 
   Example 9 11:39 
   Example 10 12:59 
   Example 11 13:16 
   Series Circuits 13:46 
    Single Current Path 13:49 
    Removal of Any Circuit Element Causes an Open Circuit 13:54 
   Kirchhoff's Laws 15:48 
    Utilized in Analyzing Circuits 15:54 
    Kirchhoff's Current Law 15:58 
    Junction Rule 16:02 
    Kirchhoff's Voltage Law 16:30 
    Loop Rule 16:49 
   Example 12 16:58 
   Example 13 17:32 
   Basic Series Circuit Analysis 18:36 
   Example 14 22:06 
   Example 15 22:29 
   Example 16 24:02 
   Example 17 26:47 
  Circuits II: Parallel Circuits 39:09
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:16 
   Parallel Circuits 0:38 
    Multiple Current Paths 0:40 
    Removal of a Circuit Element May Allow Other Branches of the Circuit to Continue Operating 0:44 
    Draw a Simple Parallel Circuit 1:02 
   Basic Parallel Circuit Analysis 3:06 
   Example 1 5:58 
   Example 2 8:14 
   Example 3 9:05 
   Example 4 11:56 
   Combination Series-Parallel Circuits 14:08 
    Circuit Doesn't Have to be Completely Serial or Parallel 14:10 
    Look for Portions of the Circuit With Parallel Elements 14:15 
    Lead to Systems of Equations to Solve 14:42 
   Analysis of a Combination Circuit 14:51 
   Example 5 20:23 
   Batteries 28:49 
    Electromotive Force 28:50 
    Pump for Charge 29:04 
    Ideal Batteries Have No Resistance 29:10 
    Real Batteries and Internal Resistance 29:20 
    Terminal Voltage in Real Batteries 29:33 
   Ideal Battery 29:50 
   Real Battery 30:25 
   Example 6 31:10 
   Example 7 33:23 
   Example 8 35:49 
   Example 9 38:43 
  RC Circuits: Steady State 34:03
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:17 
   Capacitors in Parallel 0:51 
    Store Charge on Plates 0:52 
    Can Be Replaced with an Equivalent Capacitor 0:56 
   Capacitors in Series 1:12 
    Must Be the Same 1:13 
    Can Be Replaced with an Equivalent Capacitor 1:15 
   RC Circuits 1:30 
    Comprised of a Source of Potential Difference, a Resistor Network, and Capacitor 1:31 
    RC Circuits from the Steady-State Perspective 1:37 
    Key to Understanding RC Circuit Performance 1:48 
   Charging an RC Circuit 2:08 
   Discharging an RC Circuit 6:18 
   The Time Constant 8:49 
    Time Constant 8:58 
    By 5 Time Constant 9:19 
   Example 1 9:45 
   Example 2 13:27 
   Example 3 16:35 
   Example 4 18:03 
   Example 5 19:39 
   Example 6 26:14 
  RC Circuits: Transient Analysis 1:01:07
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:13 
   Charging an RC Circuit 1:11 
    Basic RC Circuit 1:15 
    Graph of Current Circuit 1:29 
    Graph of Charge 2:17 
    Graph of Voltage 2:34 
    Mathematically Describe the Charts 2:56 
   Discharging an RC Circuit 13:29 
    Graph of Current 13:47 
    Graph of Charge 14:08 
    Graph of Voltage 14:15 
    Mathematically Describe the Charts 14:30 
   The Time Constant 20:03 
    Time Constant 20:04 
    By 5 Time Constant 20:14 
   Example 1 20:39 
   Example 2 28:53 
   Example 3 27:02 
   Example 4 44:29 
   Example 5 55:24 

III. Magnetism

  Magnets 8:38
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Magnetism 0:35 
    Force Caused by Moving Charges 0:36 
    Dipoles 0:40 
    Like Poles Repel, Opposite Poles Attract 0:53 
    Magnetic Domains 0:58 
    Random Domains 1:04 
    Net Magnetic Field 1:26 
   Example 1 1:40 
   Magnetic Fields 2:03 
    Magnetic Field Strength 2:04 
    Magnets are Polarized 2:16 
   Magnetic Field Lines 2:53 
    Show the Direction the North Pole of a Magnet Would Tend to Point if Placed on The Field 2:54 
    Direction 3:25 
    Magnetic Flux 3:41 
   The Compass 4:05 
    Earth is a Giant Magnet 4:07 
    Earth's Magnetic North Pole 4:10 
    Compass Lines Up with the Net Magnetic Field 4:48 
   Magnetic Permeability 5:00 
    Ratio of the magnetic Field Strength Induced in a Material to the Magnetic Field Strength of the Inducing Field 5:01 
    Free Space 5:13 
    Permeability of Matter 5:41 
    Highly Magnetic Materials 5:47 
   Magnetic Dipole Moment 5:54 
    The Force That a Magnet Can Exert on Moving Charges 5:59 
    Relative Strength of a Magnet 6:04 
   Example 2 6:26 
   Example 3 6:52 
   Example 4 7:32 
   Example 5 7:57 
  Moving Charges In Magnetic Fields 29:07
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Magnetic Fields 0:57 
    Vector Quantity 0:59 
    Tesla 1:08 
    Gauss 1:14 
   Forces on Moving Charges 1:30 
    Magnetic Force is Always Perpendicular to the Charged Objects Velocity 1:31 
    Magnetic Force Formula 2:04 
    Magnitude of That 2:20 
    Image 2:29 
   Direction of the Magnetic Force 3:54 
    Right-Hand Rule 3:57 
    Electron of Negative Charge 4:04 
   Example 1 4:51 
   Example 2 6:58 
   Path of Charged Particles in B Fields 8:07 
    Magnetic Force Cannot Perform Work on a Moving Charge 8:08 
    Magnetic Force Can Change Its Direction 8:11 
   Total Force on a Moving Charged Particle 9:40 
    E Field 9:50 
    B Field 9:54 
    Lorentz Force 9:57 
   Velocity Selector 10:33 
    Charged Particle in Crosses E and B Fields Can Undergo Constant Velocity Motion 10:37 
    Particle Can Travel Through the Selector Without Any Deflection 10:49 
   Mass Spectrometer 12:21 
    Magnetic Fields Accelerate Moving Charges So That They Travel in a Circle 12:26 
    Used to Determine the Mass of An Unknown Particle 12:32 
   Example 3 13:11 
   Example 4 15:01 
   Example 5 16:44 
   Example 6 17:33 
   Example 7 19:12 
   Example 8 19:50 
   Example 9 24:02 
   Example 10 25:21 
  Forces on Current-Carrying Wires 17:52
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Forces on Current-Carrying Wires 0:42 
    Moving Charges in Magnetic Fields Experience Forces 0:45 
    Current in a Wire is Just Flow of Charges 0:49 
   Direction of Force Given by RHR 4:04 
   Example 1 4:22 
   Electric Motors 5:59 
   Example 2 8:14 
   Example 3 8:53 
   Example 4 10:09 
   Example 5 11:04 
   Example 6 12:03 
  Magnetic Fields Due to Current-Carrying Wires 24:43
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Force on a Current-Carrying Wire 0:38 
    Magnetic Fields Cause a Force on Moving Charges 0:40 
    Current Carrying Wires 0:44 
    How to Find the Force 0:55 
    Direction Given by the Right Hand Rule 1:04 
   Example 1 1:17 
   Example 2 2:26 
   Magnetic Field Due to a Current-Carrying Wire 4:20 
    Moving Charges Create Magnetic Fields 4:24 
    Current-Carrying Wires Carry Moving Charges 4:27 
    Right Hand Rule 4:32 
    Multiple Wires 4:51 
    Current-Carrying Wires Can Exert Forces Upon Each Other 4:58 
    First Right Hand Rule 5:15 
   Example 3 6:46 
   Force Between Parallel Current Carrying Wires 8:01 
    Right Hand Rules to Determine Force Between Parallel Current Carrying Wires 8:03 
    Find Magnetic Field Due to First Wire, Then Find Direction of Force on 2nd Wire 8:08 
    Example 8:20 
   Gauss's Law for Magnetism 9:26 
   Example 4 10:35 
   Example 5 12:57 
   Example 6 14:19 
   Example 7 16:50 
   Example 8 18:15 
   Example 9 18:43 
  The Biot-Savart Law 21:50
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:07 
   Biot-Savart Law 0:24 
    Brute Force Method 0:49 
    Draw It Out 0:54 
    Diagram 1:35 
   Example 1 3:43 
   Example 2 7:02 
   Example 3 14:31 
  Ampere's Law 26:31
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:07 
   Ampere's Law 0:27 
    Finds the Magnetic Field Due to Current Flowing in a Wire in Situations of Planar and Cylindrical Symmetry 0:30 
    Formula 0:40 
    Example 1:00 
   Example 1 2:19 
   Example 2 4:08 
   Example 3 6:23 
   Example 4 8:06 
   Example 5 11:43 
   Example 6 13:40 
   Example 7 17:54 
  Magnetic Flux 7:24
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:07 
   Magnetic Flux 0:31 
    Amount of Magnetic Field Penetrating a Surface 0:32 
    Webers 0:42 
    Flux 1:07 
    Total Magnetic Flux 1:27 
   Magnetic Flux Through Closed Surfaces 1:51 
   Gauss's Law for Magnetism 2:20 
    Total Flux Magnetic Flux Through Any Closed Surface is Zero 2:23 
    Formula 2:45 
   Example 1 3:02 
   Example 2 4:26 
  Faraday's Law & Lenz's Law 1:04:33
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Faraday's Law 0:44 
    Faraday's Law 0:46 
    Direction of the Induced Current is Given by Lenz's Law 1:09 
    Formula 1:15 
    Lenz's Law 1:49 
   Lenz's Law 2:14 
    Lenz's Law 2:16 
    Example 2:30 
   Applying Lenz's Law 4:09 
    If B is Increasing 4:13 
    If B is Decreasing 4:30 
   Maxwell's Equations 4:55 
    Gauss's Law 4:59 
    Gauss's Law for Magnetism 5:16 
    Ampere's Law 5:26 
    Faraday's Law 5:39 
   Example 1 6:14 
   Example 2 9:36 
   Example 3 11:12 
   Example 4 19:33 
   Example 5 26:06 
   Example 6 31:55 
   Example 7 42:32 
   Example 8 48:08 
   Example 9 55:50 

IV. Inductance, RL Circuits, and LC Circuits

  Inductance 6:41
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   Self Inductance 0:25 
    Ability of a Circuit to Oppose the Magnetic Flux That is Produced by the Circuit Itself 0:27 
    Changing Magnetic Field Creates an Induced EMF That Fights the Change 0:37 
    Henrys 0:44 
    Function of the Circuit's Geometry 0:53 
   Calculating Self Inductance 1:10 
   Example 1 3:40 
   Example 2 5:23 
  RL Circuits 42:17
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:11 
   Inductors in Circuits 0:49 
    Inductor Opposes Current Flow and Acts Like an Open Circuit When Circuit is First Turned On 0:52 
    Inductor Keeps Current Going and Acts as a Short 1:04 
    If the Battery is Removed After a Long Time 1:16 
    Resister Dissipates Power, Current Will Decay 1:36 
   Current in RL Circuits 2:00 
    Define the Diagram 2:03 
    Mathematically Solve 3:07 
   Voltage in RL Circuits 7:51 
    Voltage Formula 7:52 
    Solve 8:17 
   Rate of Change of Current in RL Circuits 9:42 
   Current and Voltage Graphs 10:54 
    Current Graph 10:57 
    Voltage Graph 11:34 
   Example 1 12:25 
   Example 2 23:44 
   Example 3 34:44 
  LC Circuits 9:47
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:08 
   LC Circuits 0:30 
    Assume Capacitor is Fully Charged When Circuit is First Turned On 0:38 
    Interplay of Capacitor and Inductor Creates an Oscillating System 0:42 
   Charge in LC Circuit 0:57 
   Current and Potential in LC Circuits 7:14 
   Graphs of LC Circuits 8:27 

V. Maxwell's Equations

  Maxwell's Equations 3:38
   Intro 0:00 
   Objectives 0:07 
   Maxwell's Equations 0:19 
    Gauss's Law 0:20 
    Gauss's Law for Magnetism 0:44 
    Faraday's Law 1:00 
    Ampere's Law 1:18 
   Revising Ampere's Law 1:49 
    Allows Us to Calculate the Magnetic Field Due to an Electric Current 1:50 
    Changing Electric Field Produces a Magnetic Field 1:58 
    Conduction Current 2:33 
    Displacement Current 2:44 
   Maxwell's Equations (Complete) 2:58 

VI. Sample AP Exams

  1998 AP Practice Exam: Multiple Choice Questions 32:33
   Intro 0:00 
   1998 AP Practice Exam Link 0:11 
   Multiple Choice 36 0:36 
   Multiple Choice 37 2:07 
   Multiple Choice 38 2:53 
   Multiple Choice 39 3:32 
   Multiple Choice 40 4:37 
   Multiple Choice 41 4:43 
   Multiple Choice 42 5:22 
   Multiple Choice 43 6:00 
   Multiple Choice 44 8:09 
   Multiple Choice 45 8:27 
   Multiple Choice 46 9:03 
   Multiple Choice 47 9:30 
   Multiple Choice 48 10:19 
   Multiple Choice 49 10:47 
   Multiple Choice 50 12:25 
   Multiple Choice 51 13:10 
   Multiple Choice 52 15:06 
   Multiple Choice 53 16:01 
   Multiple Choice 54 16:44 
   Multiple Choice 55 17:10 
   Multiple Choice 56 19:08 
   Multiple Choice 57 20:39 
   Multiple Choice 58 22:24 
   Multiple Choice 59 22:52 
   Multiple Choice 60 23:34 
   Multiple Choice 61 24:09 
   Multiple Choice 62 24:40 
   Multiple Choice 63 25:06 
   Multiple Choice 64 26:07 
   Multiple Choice 65 27:26 
   Multiple Choice 66 28:32 
   Multiple Choice 67 29:14 
   Multiple Choice 68 29:41 
   Multiple Choice 69 31:23 
   Multiple Choice 70 31:49 
  1998 AP Practice Exam: Free Response Questions 29:55
   Intro 0:00 
   1998 AP Practice Exam Link 0:14 
   Free Response 1 0:22 
   Free Response 2 10:04 
   Free Response 3 16:22 

Duration: 14 hours, 27 minutes

Number of Lessons: 26

This class is geared towards high school students taking the AP Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism exam, but is also indispensable for college students taking calculus based physics. This course includes a complete walkthrough of a previous year’s Advanced Placement exam.

Additional Features:

  • Free Sample Lessons
  • Closed Captioning (CC)
  • Downloadable Lecture Slides
  • Study Guides
  • Instructor Comments

Topics Include:

  • Electric Field
  • Gauss’s Law
  • Current & Resistance
  • Conductors & Capacitors
  • Circuit Analysis
  • Magnetic Flux
  • Inductance
  • Maxwell’s Equations
  • Sample AP Exam

Professor Fullerton obtained his B.S. and M.S. in Microelectronic Engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and his secondary physics teaching certification from Drexel University. He taught undergraduate and graduate Microelectronic Engineering courses at RIT for 10+ years, and High School Physics since 2007. He was recently named a New York State Master Physics Teacher, and is the author of AP Physics 1 Essentials, Honors Physics Essentials, and Physics: Fundamentals and Problem Solving.

Student Testimonials:

“Thanks for the wonderful lecture, I'm watching it for the second time and things starts to clearer than before.” — Mohsin A.

"Hello Professor Fullerton, Thanks for the fundamentally overwhelming yet helpful lecture!" — Arshin J.