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Lecture Comments (15)

0 answers

Post by Summer Breeze on June 29 at 04:34:15 PM

Hello Summer, This is another good course offered on Educator.com. The information is well broken down. Anway, I would like to know the following: 1) After calculating using the Kinetic Energy formular, what should I derive from the answer. In fact when, do I need to apply KE formula and why? 2) I really appreciate the theories or concepts of this course, is there any way you can include more math problems related to these concepts. I feel that is what I lack when it comes to science; meaning how it is applied when making rational decisions using Math and Science. thanks

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Post by Shahram Ahmadi N. Emran on June 8, 2015

Pictures are ok, but so is her word patterns and examples. I like her as my teacher lol

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Post by Yisrael Harris on December 13, 2013

When energy is stored in a rubber band or spring, some mechanism is required to prevent its being released until we want it to be released. For example, I could compress a spring and then put a heavy object on it in order to prevent it from springing open. Or I could stretch a rubber band and hold it stretched in order to maintain it at that position. So, again, in the case of nuclear energy, what is the mechanism that is preventing the nuclear energy from being released? And since the amount of energy released in nuclear energy is huge, I would think that the mechanism responsible for preventing the release of that nuclear energy would need to be very great, although this might be incorrect.

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Post by Yisrael Harris on December 13, 2013

In the case of a rubber band or a spring, work has gone into storing the potential energy, and I imagine that the energy that will be released in releasing that stored energy will be equal to the work that was required to initially stored. So is the same true in nuclear energy? Meaning that I understand that when nuclear energy is released, the amount of energy released is enormous -- so does this mean that an enormous amount of work was required in order to create the nuclear bonds? If so, when and how did this occur? Do nuclear bonds form today, or did they all get created in some point of time in the very distant past?

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Post by Yisrael Harris on December 13, 2013

In the pendulum example, if the ball is initially high, and at the very end, the ball eventually comes to rest at the bottom, then it would seem that there has been a net loss of energy! I imagine that this has to do wih gravity, and that if there were no gravity, the pendulum would continue to swing forever. Nevertheless, where there is gravity, where has this apparent loss of energy gone?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Sep 18, 2013 9:20 PM

Post by Emily Engle on September 10, 2013

In the kinetic energy formula does the v equal velocity or speed?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:36 PM

Post by Yisrael Harris on April 17, 2013

In the last example, which energy should we use, many of the non-renewable resources are restricted not only in terms of place but also in terms of time (e.g. there is not always wind).

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:33 PM

Post by Yisrael Harris on April 16, 2013

When I throw a ball across a room, what transformation of energy has occurred?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Ebs
Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:31 PM

Post by amishi parikh on March 21, 2013

What energy is used in moving car?

0 answers

Post by Jonathan Pierre on February 19, 2013

where do u take quizes or test

0 answers

Post by Omar Perez on May 24, 2012

Pictures are ok, but so is her word patterns and examples. I like her as my teacher lol

Energy

  • Energy is the ability to do work or to cause change.
  • Potential energy is stored energy or energy of position.
    • Mechanical (elastic) potential energy, is energy stored in an object by tension, like a spring or a rubber band.
    • Chemical potential energy is energy stored in chemical bonds.
    • Nuclear energy is the energy stored in the nucleus of an atom.
    • Gravitational potential energy is energy stored in an object’s height. (GPE = mgh)
  • Kinetic energy is energy of motion.
    • Thermal energy is energy of heat, or energy from the movement of atoms or molecules.
    • Radiant energy is the energy of waves
    • Electrical energy is the energy of electrons moving through a wire.
    • Sound energy is the energy in the compressional waves of sound
    • Motion – energy of objects in motion
  • Law of conservation of energy: energy cannot be created nor destroyed, only transformed.
  • Energy resources used to generate electrical energy are either nonrenewable (fossil fuels, nuclear) or renewable (solar, wind, geothermal, hydropower, biomass)
  • Most electricity generating plants use energy to turn a turbine, which is attached to a generator that generates electricity.

Energy

What type of energy is called the energy of movement of particles in an object or the object itself?
Kinetic Energy
What type of energy is stored energy?
Potential Energy
If you drop a penny from a balcony on the second floor, the gravitational potential energy before you drop the penny will be equal to the kinetic energy of the penny just before it hits the ground (ignore the effect of friction for this problem). This is an example of what law?
Law of conservation of energy — the GPE is not lost, but transformed into KE
What are the four types of potential energy
Gravitational, Nuclear, Chemical, Elastic (Mechanical)
Light, x-rays, microwaves, infrared waves and gamma waves are all examples of what type of energy?
Radiant Energy (movement of waves)
When you warm up your hands by rubbing them together, what energy transformation is taking place?
Kinetic energy of your moving hands transforms into thermal energy due to friction.
What do we generate from our renewable and nonrenewable resources?
Electrical energy
What are the three types of fossil fuels?
Natural gas, coal, and oil
How is thermal energy used in the process of generating electrical energy?
Thermal energy is used to create steam to turn a turbine.
Thermal, radiant, and electrical are all types of what type of energy?
Kinetic Energy

*These practice questions are only helpful when you work on them offline on a piece of paper and then use the solution steps function to check your answer.

Answer

Energy

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Energy 0:03
    • Energy Overview
  • Potential Energy 1:48
    • Potential Energy
    • Mechanical (Elastic) Potential Energy
    • Chemical Potential Energy
    • Nuclear Energy
    • Gravitational Potential Energy
  • Kinetic Energy 7:34
    • Kinetic Energy
    • Thermal Energy
    • Radiant Energy
    • Electrical Energy
    • Sound
    • Motion
    • Kinetic Energy: Example
  • Law of Conservation of Energy 12:47
    • Law of Conservation of Energy
    • Electrical to Radiant
    • Chemical to Thermal
    • Potential to Kinetic
    • Friction
  • Energy Resources 20:06
    • Nonrenewable: Fossil Fuels
    • Nonrenewable: Nuclear
    • Renewable: Solar
    • Renewable: Wind
    • Renewable: Tidal
    • Renewable: Hydroelectric
    • Renewable: Geothermal
  • Example 1: Gravitational Potential Energy 38:40
  • Example 2: Kinetic Energy 42:20
  • Example 3: Maximum and Minimum Potential and Kinetic Energy 44:48
  • Example 4: Should We Use Renewable or Nonrenewable Resources to Generate Electricity? 46:31