Enter your Sign on user name and password.

Forgot password?
  • Follow us on:

In order to understand how music truly works, you must have a background in the notation and language of music. Professor Laura Ryan teaches Educator’s Music Theory Course and will guide you through an easy-to-understand introduction to music theory. Designed for a wide audience, this course is ideal for vocalists, musicians, and non-musicians alike. Professor Ryan teaches you the basics with the aid of entertaining listening exercises, on-screen keyboard playing, and plenty of examples in each video. Her course covers everything from Reading Notes on the Grand Staff, Identifying Major and Minor Scales on the Keyboard, Intervals, and Chords. Professor Ryan has 6+ years of music teaching experience along with a Master’s in Music from Boston University.

Loading video...
expand all   collapse all
I. Music Theory
  Music Theory 32:43
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:04 
   Grand Staff 0:16 
    Difference Between Single Staff and Grand Staff 0:25 
    A Brace 0:53 
    Drawing a Treble Clef 1:05 
    Remembering the Lines of a Treble Clef 1:45 
    Remembering the Spaces of a Treble Clef 2:06 
    Remembering the Lines of a Bass Clef 2:41 
    Remembering the Spaces of a Bass Clef 2:46 
    Drawing a Bass Clef 2:59 
   Major Scales 3:54 
    Using a Pattern of Intervals to Find a Major Scale in Any Key 3:59 
    Playing a C Scale 4:56 
    Playing a Series of Whole and Half Steps 5:14 
    Counting Intervals on the Keyboard 6:05 
    Writing a Major Scale 6:37 
    Writing Below the Staff 6:50 
   Minor Scales 8:09 
    Counting Whole and Half Steps of a Minor Scale 8:58 
    Listening to A Minor 9:08 
    Finding the Interval Pattern of a Minor Scale 9:55 
    Writing a Scale in Both Treble and Bass Clefs 10:59 
    Listening to A Minor 11:10 
   Names of White Keys 11:25 
    Matching Keyboard Notes to Notes on the Staff 12:07 
    Finding Middle C on the Keyboard 12:20 
    Finding Middle C on the Grand Staff 12:43 
    Stem Directions 12:53 
   Names of Black Keys 13:28 
    Black Keys Can Have Two Different Names 13:38 
    Sharp = Raise Half Step 13:53 
    Flat = Lower Half Step 14:06 
    White Key Half Step Example: E and F 15:08 
    Finding Black Keys on the Staff 15:53 
    Writing Sharps and Flats on the Staff 16:02 
    Writing Sharps and Flats After Letters 17:27 
   How to Play Chords 17:44 
    Playing a C Major Chord 18:02 
    Playing Every Other Key to Form a Chord 18:52 
    Writing Chords on the Staff 19:00 
   Chord Progressions 19:24 
    Chord Progressions are a Series of Chords 19:28 
    Writing Chord Progressions on the Staff 10:03 
    Playing Chord Progressions on the Keyboard 21:40 
   Example 1: Grand Staff 22:07 
   Example 2: Major Scale on Keyboard 22:52 
   Example 3: Minor Scale on Keyboard 23:49 
   Example 4: Naming White and Black Keys 25:14 
   Example 5: Chords 27:33 
   Example 6: Exploring Chord Progressions 28:47 
II. Properties of the Grand Staff
  Staff, Treble Clef & Bass Clef 9:30
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   The Staff, Five Lines 0:18 
    The Staff Always Has Five Lines 0:32 
    Ledger Lines 0:45 
    Why The Staff Only Has Five Lines 1:00 
   The Staff, Four Spaces 1:22 
    Writing Space Notes Between Ledger Lines 1:32 
   Treble Clef 1:41 
    The Clef Tells You Which Note is Where 1:47 
    Writing a Treble Clef 2:00 
    Using Phrases to Remember the Order of the Lines 2:38 
   Bass Clef 2:58 
    Writing a Bass Clef 3:10 
    Using Phrases to Remember the Order of the Lines 3:54 
   The Grand Staff 4:57 
    The Grand Staff is the Treble Clef and Bass Clef Connected by a Brace 5:00 
    What the Brace Means 5:32 
    Chords 7:00 
   Example 1: Treble Clef 7:17 
   Example 2: Bass Clef 8:16 
   Example 3: Grand Staff 8:46 
  Bar Lines & Measures 18:05
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   Bar Lines 0:22 
    Where the Bar Line Begins and Ends 0:35 
    Measures are Used to Think of Music in Smaller Pieces 1:00 
    Bar Lines Divide A Set Amount of Beats For Each Measure 2:03 
   Measures 2:24 
    4/4 Time Signature 2:43 
    Only 4 Beats in Every Measure When There is a 4/4 Time Signature 2:39 
    In a Measure, Notes are Spaced Away from the Measure 4:12 
    Listening to the Example 4:45 
   Double Bar Lines 5:59 
    Representing the End and Beginning of Examples 6:20 
    Listening to the Example 7:07 
   Repeat Signs 9:03 
   First and Second Endings 10:34 
    Listening to the Example 12:55 
   Example 1: Creating Bar Lines 14:04 
   Example 2: Creating Double Bar Lines 14:17 
   Example 3: Creating Bar Lines, Double Bar Lines and Repeat Sign 14:39 
   Example 4: Creating First and Second Endings 15:24 
III. Notes and Rhythms
  Rhythmic Notation 18:44
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   Whole Notes 0:18 
    Writing Whole Notes 0:24 
    Whole Notes are 4 Beats 0:30 
    Listening to a Whole Note 0:56 
    Octave 1:26 
    Writing and Identifying Example Whole Notes 1:48 
   Half Notes 4:17 
    Half Notes are Connected to a Staff 4:21 
    Half Notes are 2 Beats 4:24 
    Writing Half Notes 4:38 
    Rules for Stem Directions 5:10 
   Quarter Notes 7:06 
    Quarter Notes are 1 Beat 1:14 
    Writing Quarter Notes on the Staff 7:54 
   Stem Direction 9:16 
    It's Okay to Have a Down Stem and Up Stem in the Same Measure 10:09 
   Example 1: Whole Notes 10:56 
   Example 2: Half Notes 11:26 
   Example 3: Quarter Notes 11:51 
   Example 4: Quarter Notes 12:59 
   Example 5: Stem Direction 13:01 
   Example 6: Rhythmic Combinations 14:25 
  Time Signature 18:49
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   4/4 0:21 
    What the Top and Bottom Numbers Represent 0:46 
    4 = Quarter Note 1:15 
    Review of Whole, Half, and Quarter Notes 1:36 
    Fill in 4 Counts for Every Measure 1:54 
    Listening to the Example 3:27 
   4/4 Continued 5:23 
    Listening to the Example 6:14 
    Middle C 6:22 
   2/4 7:52 
    2 = Beats/Measure 8:04 
    Writing 2/4 on the Staff 9:03 
   2/4 Continued 9:11 
    Listening to the Example 10:33 
   Example 1: 4/4 11:26 
   Example 2: 4/4 13:11 
   Example 3: 2/4 13:38 
   Example 4: 2/4 14:32 
  Rhythmic Notation, Continued 27:57
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   Dotted Half Notes 0:39 
    Dots Add Half of the Note's Beat to Itself 1:15 
    Dotted Half Notes = 3 Quarter Notes = 3 Beats 1:47 
    Dotted Quarter Notes 2:03 
    Having Three Beats in a Measure 2:30 
    3/4 Time Signature = 3 Counts per Measure 2:58 
   Dotted Quarter Notes 3:34 
    Eighth Notes Are Half of a Quarter Note 3:44 
    Dotted Quarter Notes = 1.5 Beats 4:30 
   Eighth Notes 5:56 
    Two Eighth Notes in Every Quarter Note 6:01 
    Listening to the Example 7:18 
   Dotted Eighth Notes 8:34 
    1 Eighth Note = 2 Sixteenth Notes 8:42 
   Eighth Notes Barred and Separate 9:57 
   Sixteenth Notes 11:00 
    1 Sixteenth Note = Half of an Eighth Note 11:09 
   Dotted Sixteenth Notes 12:43 
    1 Sixteenth Note = 2 Thirty-Second Notes 13:03 
   Sixteenth Notes Barred and Separate 14:27 
   Thirty-Second Notes 16:03 
    Listening to the Example 17:30 
   Thirty-Second Notes Barred and Separate 18:25 
   Example 1: Dotted Half Notes 18:51 
   Example 2: Dotted Quarter Notes 19:55 
   Example 3: Eighth Note Combinations 21:13 
   Example 4: Sixteenth Note Combinations 23:16 
   Example 5: Thirty-Second Note Combinations 24:26 
  Rests 32:58
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   Whole Rests 0:47 
    Writing the Whole Rest 0:59 
    How Many Counts a Whole Rest is in Different Time Signatures 1:30 
   Half Rests 1:50 
    How Many Counts a Half Rest is 1:53 
    Writing a Half Rest 2:10 
    Listening to a Whole Rest 2:38 
    Half Rests are Two Counts of Silence 3:19 
    Difference Between Writing a Half and Whole Rest 4:19 
   Quarter Rests 4:45 
    Quarter Rests are One Count of Silence 4:49 
    Review of Writing Whole and Half Rests 5:07 
    Writing a Quarter Rest 5:25 
    Listening to a Quarter Rest 6:59 
   Eighth Rests 7:57 
    Writing an Eighth Rest 8:06 
    Review of Whole, Half, and Quarter Rests 8:14 
    Listening to an Eighth Rest 9:33 
    Two Eighth Rests in a Row 10:09 
   Sixteenth Rests 10:32 
    Writing a Sixteenth Rest 10:40 
    Review of Whole, Half, Quarter, and Eighth Rests 11:27 
    Listening to a Sixteenth Rest 12:15 
   Thirty-Second Rests 13:31 
    Review of Whole, Half, Quarter, Eighth, and Sixteenth Rests 13:49 
    Written Example with Thirty-Second Rests 14:28 
    Not Writing the Bar Over a Rest 16:04 
    Listening to a Thirty-Second Rest 16:29 
   Explanation of Rest Placement 17:12 
    Writing the Eighth Rest 17:54 
   Exploration of Rest Placement Continued 18:41 
    Writing the Sixteenth Rest 18:42 
    Writing the Thirty-Second Rest 19:14 
   Example 1: Whole Rests 19:41 
   Example 2: Half Rests 20:41 
   Example 3: Quarter Rests 21:58 
   Example 4: Eighth Rests 23:10 
   Example 5: Sixteenth Rests 25:14 
   Example 6: Thirty-Second Rests 27:27 
   Example 7: Completing 4/4 Measures with Rests 31:20 
   Example 8: Completing 2/4 Measures with Rests 31:53 
IV. Keyboard Basics
  Introduction of Keyboard 19:11
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:10 
   Visual Presentation of the Keyboard 0:35 
   Introduction of Middle C 1:28 
    Locate C Key 1:50 
    Middle C Key 2:22 
    Middle C on This Keyboard 3:22 
   C in Octaves 3:34 
    Eight Keys 3:53 
   Middle C on the Grand Staff Treble Clef 4:35 
   Middle C on the Grand Staff Bass Clef 5:45 
    C on Keyboard 6:41 
   Illustration of Every C on the Piano Keyboard 7:22 
    C on Keyboard 7:54 
    Bass Clef 9:22 
    Listen to More Octaves 10:02 
   Example 1: Writing Middle C on Treble Clef 11:14 
   Example 2: Writing Middle C in Bass Clef 12:50 
   Example 3: Writing Every C on the Keyboard 14:06 
   Example 4: Finding Middle C on the Keyboard 16:38 
   Example 5: Every C on a Keyboard 17:47 
  Finding D E F G A B on the Keyboard 24:46
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:11 
   Treble Clef C D E F G A B 0:34 
    Finding C 0:56 
    Finding D 1:13 
    Finding E 1:25 
    Finding F 1:33 
    Finding G, A and B 1:52 
   Bass Clef C D E F G A B 2:30 
    Playing C, D, E, F, G, A, B 2:46 
    Finding C 4:16 
    Finding D, E, F, G, A, B 4:39 
   White Key Whole Step 5:08 
    Half Steps 5:44 
    Whole Steps 5:59 
    Identifying Half and Whole Steps 6:19 
    Pattern of Half and Whole Steps 7:38 
   White Key Half Step 8:07 
    Sounds of Half Steps 8:30 
   Treble Clef C D E F G A B 9:21 
    Writing Treble Clef Notes on the Staff 9:42 
    Listening to Treble Clef C, D, E, F, G, A, and B 10:30 
    Drawing Bar Lines 11:12 
   Bass Clef C D E F G A B 11:30 
    Listening to Bass Clef C, D, E, F, G, A, and B 12:10 
    Drawing Bar Lines 12:52 
   White Key Whole Step and Half Step 13:19 
    Writing Whole Steps on the Staff 13:38 
    Writing Half Steps on the Staff 15:03 
   Example 1: Writing C D E F G A B in Treble Clef 15:59 
   Example 2: Writing C D E F G A B in Bass Clef 16:48 
   Example 3: Writing White Key Whole Steps 18:53 
   Example 4: Writing White Key Half Steps 19:57 
   Example 5: Finding C D E F G A B on the Keyboard 20:47 
   Example 6: Finding White Key Whole and Half Steps 21:55 
  Identifying Black Keys 27:22
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:14 
   Sharp Keys C# D# E# F# G# A# B# 0:31 
    Sharp Something by Raising it by a Half Step 0:45 
    Listening to Sharps 0:50 
    Finding Sharps on the Keyboard 1:38 
    White Keys That Are Also Sharp 2:19 
   Flat Keys D Flat, E Flat, F Flat, G Flat, A Flat, B Flat, C Flat 2:25 
    Finding Flats on the Keyboard 2:37 
    White Keys That Are Also Flat 2:57 
    Enharmonic Keys: One Note with Two Names 3:05 
   Whole Steps Using Black Keys 3:20 
    Two Half Steps = One Whole Step 3:50 
    Finding Half and Whole Steps on the Keyboard 4:03 
    Half Step + Half Step = Whole Step 5:27 
   Half Steps Using Black Keys 5:58 
    Writing a Sharp or Flat After the Letter 6:12 
    Listening to the Chromatic Scale 6:50 
    Chromatic Movement 7:22 
   Writing Sharps on the Staff 7:32 
    Middle Box Needs to Intersect the Line or Space That It's Referring To 7:37 
    The Order of Sharps 8:09 
    Sharps in the Bass Clef 8:27 
    In the Staff, The Sharp or Flat Comes Before the Note 8:43 
    Using Sharps While Ascending, Using Flats While Descending 9:07 
   Writing Flats on the Staff 9:34 
    The Order of Flats 9:37 
    Using Flats While Descending 10:03 
    Using Sharps While Ascending 10:19 
   Writing Black Key Whole and Half Steps 10:26 
    Playing Half Steps on the Keyboard 10:45 
    Writing Whole Steps on the Staff With Sharps and Flats While Ascending and Descending 11:00 
    Listening to the Example 12:02 
   Example 1: Writing Sharp and Flat Notes in Treble Clef 12:58 
   Example 2: Writing Sharp and Flat Notes in Bass Clef 16:56 
   Example 3: Writing Black Key Whole Steps 18:08 
   Example 4: Writing Black Key Half Steps 21:00 
   Example 5: Finding Sharps on the Keyboard 24:06 
   Example 6: Finding Flats on the Keyboard 24:47 
   Example 7: Finding Black Key Whole and Half Steps on the Keyboard 25:18 
  C Major Scale Whole & Half Steps 19:19
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:11 
   C Major Scale on Keyboard 0:24 
    Pattern of Whole and Half Steps for Major Scales 1:49 
   C Major Scale on the Staff 4:30 
    Ascending and Descending Scales 5:18 
   C Major Whole and Half Steps on the Staff 6:36 
   Example 1: Writing out C Major Scale in Treble Clef 7:55 
   Example 2: Writing out C Major Scale in Bass Clef 9:56 
   Example 3: Illustrating the Whole/Half Step Pattern in C Major 10:50 
   Example 4: Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern to Find a Major Scale on 'D' 12:37 
    Writing D Major Scale on Staff 15:06 
   Example 5: Finding and Playing C Major on Keyboard 15:50 
   Example 6: Finding and Playing D Major on Keyboard Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern 16:23 
    Finding and Playing F Major on Keyboard Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern 17:58 
V. Intervals
  Major, Minor, Perfect & Numbered Intervals 27:50
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:10 
   Numbering Notes of C Major Scale on Keyboard 0:22 
    Scale Degrees of C Major Scale 1:00 
   Illustration of Major and Minor Intervals of C Major Scale 1:46 
    Major 2nd (M2) 2:34 
    Major 3rd (M3) 2:43 
    M is the Abbreviation for 'Major' 3:04 
    Perfect 4th (P4) 3:44 
    P is the Abbreviation for 'Perfect' 3:50 
    Perfect 5th (P5) 4:03 
    Major 6th (M6) 4:18 
    Major 7th (M7) 4:27 
    Perfect 8th or Perfect Octave (P8) 4:42 
    Listening to the Major Intervals on the Keyboard 5:15 
    Minor Intervals of the C Major Scale 6:59 
    Half Steps are Minor Intervals 7:50 
    Hearing the Difference Between Major and Minor Intervals 8:47 
   Illustration of Perfect Intervals in C Major Scale 8:56 
    Listening to the Perfect Intervals of C Major 9:29 
    Counting Half Steps of P4 10:05 
    Counting Half Steps of P5 10:26 
    Counting Half Steps of P8 10:43 
   Numbering Intervals of C Major Scale on the Grand Staff 11:01 
   Identifying Major and Minor Intervals of C Major Scale on Grand Staff 12:04 
    Finding Major and Minor Intervals on the Grand Staff 12:38 
    Every Whole Step is M2, Every Half Step is m2 13:48 
   Identifying Perfect Intervals of C Major Scale on Grand Staff 14:13 
    Drawing and Playing Intervals as Chords 14:57 
   Example 1: Finding Major Intervals in C Major Scale 16:32 
   Example 2: Finding Minor Intervals in C Major Scale 17:07 
   Example 3: Finding Perfect Intervals in the C Major Scale 17:38 
   Example 4: Writing Major Intervals of C Major Scale 18:45 
   Example 5: Writing Minor and Perfect Intervals of C Major Scale 20:07 
   Example 6: Writing Major, Minor and Perfect Intervals Independent of the C Major Scale 21:26 
    Counting Half Steps of M3 22:57 
    Counting Half Steps of P4 23:55 
    Counting Half Steps of P5 24:43 
    Counting Half Steps of M6 25:09 
    Counting Half Steps of M7 26:14 
   Example 7: Numbering Intervals 26:49 
VI. Major and Minor Keys
  Circle of Fifths 24:55
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   C 0:21 
    Circle of Fifths 0:33 
    Relative Minor Keys 0:44 
    Relative Minor Key to C is A Minor 0:56 
    Listening to the C Scale 1:10 
    To Find the Relative Minor, Go Down 4 Half Steps 1:20 
    The Relative Minor Shares the Key Signature of the Major Scale 1:42 
   C, G 1:58 
    Relative Minor to G Major is E Minor 2:07 
    Always Use the Natural Minor for Relative Minors 2:36 
    Why It's Called the Circle of Fifths 2:59 
   C, G, D 3:35 
    Finding the Relative Minor of D Major 4:17 
   C, G, D, A 4:42 
    Finding the Relative Minor of A Major 5:03 
    Relative Minor of A Major is F# Minor 5:10 
   C, G, D, A, E 5:50 
    Relative Minor of E Major is C# Minor 6:03 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat 7:19 
    Relative Minor of B Major / C Flat Major is G# Minor 8:00 
    Listening to B Major and G# Minor 8:28 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat 9:14 
    The Relative Minor of F# Major / G Flat Major is D# Minor 10:04 
    F# Major / G Flat Major and D# Minor Have Six Sharps / Six Flats 10:25 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C# 11:55 
    The Relative Minor of D Flat Major / C # Major is B Flat Minor 12:24 
    Listening to D Flat/C# Major and B Flat Minor 13:08 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat 14:06 
    Listening to A Flat Major and F Minor 14:48 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat 15:19 
    E Flat Major Has Three Flats, And Its Relative Minor is C Minor 15:52 
    Listening to E Flat Major and C Minor 16:00 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat, B Flat 16:23 
    B Flat Major Has Two Flats, And Its Relative Minor is G Minor 16:55 
    Listening to B Flat Major and G Minor 17:10 
   C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat, B Flat, F 17:25 
    F Major Has One Flat, And Its Relative Minor is D Minor 18:00 
   Example 1: Play Circle of Fifths 18:31 
    Writing the Major Keys of the Circle of Fifths 18:32 
    Writing the Relative Minor Keys of the Circle of Fifths 20:20 
    Listening to the Circle of Fifths 22:01 
  Minor Scales 34:12
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   Natural Minor 0:42 
    Natural Minor has Lowered Third, Sixth, and Seventh 1:49 
    Lowering the Third, Sixth, and Seventh to Find A Minor 2:34 
    Listening to the Difference Between a Major Scale and a Natural Minor Scale 4:28 
   Natural Minor Continued 5:14 
    Listening to the Difference Between a C Major Scale and a C Natural Minor Scale 5:59 
    Writing C Natural Minor on the Staff 6:28 
   Harmonic Minor 7:14 
    Harmonic Minor Has One Difference from Natural Minor 7:19 
    Review of Natural Minor 7:36 
    In Harmonic, You Lower the Third and the Sixth, But You Keep the Seventh as it Would Be in a Major Scale 8:01 
    Listening to the Major, Natural Minor, and Harmonic Minor Scales 9:05 
   Harmonic Minor Continued 10:26 
    Writing C Harmonic Minor on the Staff 10:43 
    Listening to C Harmonic Minor 11:20 
   Melodic Minor 11:47 
    Melodic Minor Differs When Ascending and Descending 12:15 
    Writing Ascending and Descending Melodic Minor on the Staff 13:00 
    Listening to Melodic Minor 13:30 
   Melodic Minor Continued 14:13 
    Writing C Melodic Minor on the Staff 14:18 
    Listening to C Melodic Minor 15:27 
   Example 1: Writing Natural Minor 16:04 
   Example 2: Writing Harmonic Minor 17:54 
   Example 3: Writing Melodic Minor 19:35 
   Example 4: Exploring Natural Minor Intervals 24:08 
    Augmented = An Interval with the Second Note Raised One Half Step 27:07 
    Diminished = Lowered Half Step 27:42 
   Example 5: Exploring Harmonic Minor Intervals 27:52 
   Example 6: Exploring Melodic Minor Intervals 30:19 
  Key Signatures 32:43
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:09 
   Keys of G and D 0:16 
    Writing and Listening to G Major on the Grand Staff 0:18 
    Writing and Listening to D Major on the Grand Staff 1:36 
   Keys of A and E 3:24 
    Writing A Major on the Staff 3:25 
    Writing E Major on the Staff 4:14 
    Listening to A and E Majors 4:44 
   Keys of B and F# 6:04 
    Writing B Major on the Staff 6:06 
    Writing F# Major on the Staff 6:54 
    Listening to B and F# Majors 7:31 
   Key of C# 8:47 
    Writing C# Major on the Staff 9:40 
    Listening to C# Major 10:11 
   Keys of F and B Flat 10:34 
    Writing F Major on the Staff 10:44 
    Writing B Flat Major on the Staff 11:17 
    Listening to F and B Flat Majors 11:46 
   Keys of E Flat and A Flat 12:33 
    Writing E Flat Major on the Staff 13:00 
    Writing A Flat Major on the Staff 13:57 
    Listening to E Flat and A Flat Majors 14:46 
   Keys of D Flat and G Flat 16:12 
    Writing D Flat Major on the Staff 16:20 
    Writing G Flat Major on the Staff 17:04 
    Listening to D Flat and G Flat Majors 17:48 
   Key of C Flat 18:58 
    Writing C Flat Major on the Staff 19:00 
    Listening to C Flat Major 19:45 
   Example 1: Order of Sharps 20:30 
    Phrase for Sharps Backwards: Bead, G, C, F 21:15 
   Example 2: Order of Flats 21:39 
    Order of Flats is the Order of Sharps Backwards 21:41 
   Example 3: Identify Keys of G and D 22:17 
   Example 4: Identify Keys of A and E 23:55 
   Example 5: Identify Keys of B, F# and C# 25:48 
   Example 6: Identify Keys of F, B Flat and E Flat 27:56 
   Example 7: Identify Keys of A Flat, D Flat and G Flat 29:58 
   Example 8: Identify Key of C Flat 31:33 
  The Major Scale in 12 Different Keys 37:10
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:14 
   C Major 0:40 
   C# (D Flat) Major 2:14 
    C# Major 2:24 
    D Flat Major 4:12 
   D Major 6:24 
   E Flat Major 7:57 
    Why E Flat Major is not known as D# Major 9:38 
   E Major 10:26 
   F Major 11:33 
   F# (G Flat) Major 12:49 
   G Major 14:59 
   A Flat Major 15:38 
    Why A Flat Major is not known as G# Major 16:11 
   A Major 18:30 
   B Flat Major 20:13 
   B (C Flat) Major 21:15 
   Example 1: Create a Major Scale on C 25:37 
   Example 2: Create a Major Scale on D 26:10 
   Example 3: Create a Major Scale on E 26:37 
   Example 4: Create a Major Scale on F 28:36 
   Example 5: Create a Major Scale on G 28:57 
   Example 6: Create a Major Scale on A 29:32 
   Example 7: Create a Major Scale on B 30:33 
   Example 8: Create a Major Scale on C# 31:13 
   Example 9: Create a Major Scale on E Flat 32:35 
   Example 10: Create a Major Scale on F# 34:11 
   Example 11: Create a Major Scale on A Flat 34:48 
   Example 12: Create a Major Scale on B Flat 35:53 
VII. Scale Degrees
  Scale Degrees 25:55
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:08 
   Tonic 0:25 
   Supertonic 1:52 
   Mediant 3:39 
   Subdominant 5:03 
   Dominant 6:53 
   Submediant 9:13 
   Leading Tone 11:10 
   Altered Scale Degrees in Natural Minor 13:30 
    Natural Minor has a Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and FlatLeading Tone (7th) 13:58 
   Altered Scale Degrees in Harmonic Minor 15:10 
    Harmonic Minor has a Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and Sharp Leading Tone (7th) 15:29 
   Altered Scale Degrees in Melodic Minor 16:42 
    Melodic Minor is Different Ascending and Descending 16:58 
    Melodic Minor has an Ascending Flat Median (3rd), Sharp Submediant (6th), and Sharp Leading Tone (7th), but a Descending Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and Flat Leading Tone (7th) 17:12 
   Example 1: Finding the Tonic 18:34 
   Example 2: Finding the Supertonic 19:18 
   Example 3: Finding the Mediant 19:55 
   Example 4: Finding the Subdominant 20:08 
   Example 5: Finding the Dominant 20:30 
   Example 6: Finding the Submediant 20:54 
   Example 7: Finding the Leading Tone 21:16 
   Example 8: Natural Minor Scale Degrees 21:45 
   Example 9: Harmonic Minor Scale Degrees 22:26 
   Example 10: Melodic Minor Scale Degrees 24:07 
VIII. Accidentals
  Double Sharps & Flats 13:40
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:12 
   Review of Sharp 0:19 
   Double Sharp 1:13 
    X = Double Sharp 1:35 
   Double Sharp In a Scale 3:58 
   Review of Flat 5:59 
   Double Flat 7:24 
    Two Flat Signs = Double Flat 7:34 
    Use of Double Flat In a Scale 8:12 
   Example 1: Writing Double Sharps 11:02 
   Example 2: Double Sharp Equivalencies 11:30 
   Example 3: Writing Double Flats 12:11 
   Example 4: Double Flat Equivalencies 12:42 
IX. Rhythms
  3/4, Simple & Compound Meter 15:46
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:10 
   Time Signature of 3/4 0:18 
    Top Number is How Many Beats per Measure, Bottom Number is What Note Makes One Beat 0:28 
    3/4 Has Three Beats per Measure 1:06 
   3/4 Continued 1:31 
   Simple Meter, Duple Simple 2:21 
    Duple Simple = 2/4 2:32 
   Simple Meter, Triple Simple 3:01 
    Triple Simple = 3/4 3:02 
   Simple Meter, Quadruple Simple 3:38 
    Quadruple Simple = 4/4 3:39 
   Compound Meter, Compound Triple 4:02 
    Compound Triple = 3/8 4:03 
    3/8 = Three Eighth Notes Per Measure 4:28 
   Compound Meter, Compound Duple or Simple Triple 5:13 
    Compound Duple = 6/8 5:20 
    6/8 = Six Eighth Notes Per Measure 5:32 
    Simple Triple = 6/8 5:43 
   Compound Meter, Compound Triple 6:42 
    Compound Triple = 9/8 6:43 
    9/8 = Nine Eighth Notes Per Measure 6:46 
   Compound Meter, Compound Quadruple 7:41 
    Compound Quadruple = 12/8 = Twelve Eighth Notes Per Measure 7:42 
   Example 1: 3/4 8:53 
    3/4 Has Three Beats per Measure 9:02 
   Example 2: Duple Simple 9:30 
   Example 3: Triple Simple 9:51 
   Example 3 Part 2: Quadruple Simple 10:14 
   Example 4: Compound Triple 10:39 
   Example 5: Compound Duple or Simple Triple 11:06 
   Example 6: Compound Triple 13:53 
   Example 7: Compound Quadruple 14:37 
X. Solfeggio
  Solfeggio 20:32
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:10 
   Movable Do 0:36 
    Fixed Do 0:50 
    Movable Do: When You Have the Tonic Note of Every Scale as Do 0:59 
   Re 2:42 
    Re is the Supertonic, or Second Scale Degree (2nd) 2:43 
   Mi 3:47 
    Mi is the Mediant, or Third Scale Degree (3rd) 3:55 
   Fa 4:32 
    Fa is the Subdominant, or Fourth Scale Degree (4th) 5:10 
   Sol 6:01 
    Sol is the Dominant, or Fifth Scale Degree (5th) 6:20 
   La 7:02 
    La is the Submediant, or Sixth Scale Degree (6th) 7:10 
   Si (Ti) 8:54 
    Ti was Introduced in America 9:00 
    Si (Ti) is the Leading Tone, or Seventh Scale Degree (7th) 9:55 
   Ear Training Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do 11:03 
   Example 1: Finding Do 12:30 
   Example 2: Finding Re 12:42 
   Example 3: Finding Mi 12:58 
   Example 4: Finding Fa 13:32 
   Example 5: Finding Sol 14:34 
   Example 6: Finding La 15:08 
   Example 7: Finding Si 16:02 
   Example 8: Finding Combinations of Solfeggio Patterns 17:10 
XI. Triads and Chords
  Major Triads 27:19
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:06 
   C Major Triad Root 1:00 
    Three Notes Stacked on Top of One Another = Chord, and All Notes are Played at the Same Time 1:57 
   C Major Triad Third 2:18 
    What a Third is 2:21 
    A Third is Five Half Steps Above the First Note, or the Root 3:06 
   C Major Triad Fifth 4:27 
   Finding The Third 6:20 
    The Third is Always the Middle Note of a Chord 6:37 
   Finding the Fifth 7:54 
    Count up 4 Half Steps from the 3rd to Find the Fifth 10:07 
   Transposing Triads 11:04 
    Transposing 11:13 
   Example 1: Triads on Black Keys 13:38 
   Example 2: Triads on White Keys 18:41 
   Example 3: Finding the Root 22:36 
   Example 4: Finding the Third 23:22 
   Example 5: Finding the Fifth 23:40 
   Example 6: Playing a Triad on Every Key 25:22 
  Minor Triads 32:03
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   C Minor Triad Root 0:35 
    Finding the Root of the Chord 0:58 
    Review of Major Triad 1:15 
    How to Write a Minor Triad 1:28 
    Writing the C Minor Triad on the Staff 1:57 
    Major Triads are Labeled with an Uppercase I, But Minor Triads are Labeled with a Lowercase i 2:22 
   C Minor Triad Third 2:39 
    Using Half Step Pattern to Find the Third 2:55 
    Finding the Minor Third Using 4 Half Steps 3:33 
   C Minor Triad Fifth 4:06 
    Using Half Step Pattern to Find the Fifth 4:24 
    Finding the Minor Fifth Using 5 Half Steps 4:38 
    Half Step Pattern of Major and Minor Chords are Opposite 5:39 
   Finding the Third 6:13 
    Converting D Major to D Minor by Lowering the Third 6:37 
    Using Key Signature to Find Minor Chord 7:37 
    Writing Out a D Minor Chord 7:54 
   Finding the Fifth 8:22 
    Finding the B Flat Minor Chord Using Half Step Pattern 8:54 
    Playing a B Flat Major and B Flat Minor Scale 10:14 
    Writing the B Flat Minor Chord on the Staff 11:09 
   Transposing Minor Triads 11:42 
    Finding the A Major Chord by Counting Steps 11:56 
    Writing the Sharps of A Major 12:53 
    Finding A Major on the Keyboard 13:23 
    Finding A Minor on the Keyboard by Counting Steps 13:40 
    Playing A Major Scale on the Keyboard 13:59 
    Playing A Minor Scale on the Keyboard 14:10 
    A Minor Doesn't Have Any Accidentals 14:40 
    Finding D Flat Minor Chord 15:32 
    The Only Difference Between a Major and Minor Chord is the Third 16:54 
   Example 1: Finding Minor Triads on Black Keys 17:01 
    Relative Major and Minor 20:50 
   Example 2: Finding Minor Triads on White Keys 23:08 
   Example 3: Finding the Root 26:50 
   Example 4: Finding the Third 27:13 
   Example 5: Finding the Fifth 27:27 
   Example 6: Playing a Minor Triad on Every Key 29:24 
  Augmented Chords 21:08
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:10 
   C Augmented Chord 0:29 
    The Third of an Augmented Chord is the Same as the Third of a Major Chord 0:55 
    There are 5 Half Steps Between the Root and Third of an Augmented Chord 1:14 
    There are 5 Half Steps Between the Third and the Fifth of an Augmented Third 1:31 
    Writing an Augmented Chord on the Staff 2:33 
    How to Label an Augmented Chord 2:49 
   D Augmented Chord 2:57 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the D Augmented Chord 3:03 
    Listening to the D Augmented Chord 3:45 
   E Augmented Chord 4:21 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the E Augmented Chord 4:31 
    Writing the E Augmented Chord on the Staff 5:16 
   F Augmented Chord 6:19 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the F Augmented Chord 6:26 
    Listening to the F Augmented Chord 7:28 
   G Augmented Chord 7:53 
    Writing the G Augmented Chord on the Staff 8:04 
   A Augmented Chord 8:30 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the A Augmented Chord 8:40 
    Listening to the A Augmented Chord 9:10 
   B Augmented Chord 9:39 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the B Augmented Chord 9:50 
    The B Augmented Chord Has a Double Sharp 10:20 
   Example 1: Playing C Augmented, Writing C Augmented 11:19 
   Example 2: Playing D Augmented, Writing D Augmented 12:03 
   Example 3: Playing E Augmented, Writing E Augmented 13:21 
   Example 4: Playing F Augmented, Writing F Augmented 14:47 
   Example 5: Playing G Augmented, Writing G Augmented 16:19 
   Example 6: Playing A Augmented, Writing A Augmented 16:55 
   Example 7: Playing B Augmented, Writing B Augmented 17:40 
  Diminished Chords 19:05
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   C Diminished Chord 0:28 
    Diminished Chords are Made Up of Two Minor Thirds 0:40 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the C Diminished Chord 0:50 
    Listening to the C Diminished Chord 1:20 
    Reviewing the C Augmented Chord 1:41 
   D Diminished Chord 2:34 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the D Diminished Chord 2:38 
    Listening to the D Diminished Chord 3:00 
   E Diminished Chord 4:11 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the E Diminished Chord 4:18 
    Writing the E Diminished Chord on the Staff 5:16 
   F Diminished Chord 5:24 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the F Diminished Chord 5:30 
    Listening to the F Diminished Chord 5:50 
   G Diminished Chord 6:42 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the G Diminished Chord 6:44 
    Listening to the G Diminished Chord 7:05 
   A Diminished Chord 8:29 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the A Diminished Chord 8:50 
    Listening to the A Diminished Chord 9:05 
    Listening to the A Minor Chord 9:13 
    Listening to the A Major Chord 9:25 
    Listening to the A Augmented Chord 9:32 
   B Diminished Chord 10:00 
    Counting Half Steps to Find the B Diminished Chord 10:09 
    Listening to the B Diminished Chord 10:27 
    Listening to the B Augmented Chord 10:35 
    Listening to the B Major Chord 10:42 
    Listening to the B Minor Chord 10:45 
   Example 1: Playing D Flat Diminished, Writing D Flat Diminished 11:42 
   Example 2: Playing E Flat Diminished, Writing E Flat Diminished 13:05 
   Example 3: Playing F# Diminished, Writing F# Diminished 14:01 
   Example 4: Playing A Flat Diminished, Writing A Flat Diminished 14:51 
   Example 5: Playing B Flat Diminished, Writing B Flat Diminished 16:36 
XII. Figured Bass
  Roman Numeral Notation in Major & Minor 28:53
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:09 
   Major I 0:35 
    Creating Chords on Every Scale Degree 0:50 
    Review of Using Half Steps to Write a Major Chord 1:27 
    Labeling a Major Chord as I 2:08 
   Major ii 2:20 
    ii is a Minor Chord 2:34 
   Major iii 2:48 
    iii is a Minor Chord 3:04 
   Major IV 3:10 
    IV is a Major Chord 3:12 
   Major V 3:27 
    V is a Major Chord 3:31 
   Major vi 3:37 
    vi is a Minor Chord 3:40 
   Major vii0 4:10 
    vii0 is a Diminished Chord 4:14 
    A Diminished Chord is Two Minor Intervals Stacked on Top of Each Other 4:40 
   Natural Minor i 6:24 
    Review of Minor Scale's Lowered Scale Degrees 6:30 
   Natural Minor ii0 6:59 
    ii0 is a Diminished Chord 7:27 
   Natural Minor III 7:38 
    III is a Major Chord 7:43 
   Natural Minor iv 8:01 
    iv is a Minor Chord 8:17 
   Natural Minor v 8:23 
    v is a Minor Chord 8:55 
   Natural Minor VI 9:04 
    VI is a Major Chord 9:12 
   Natural Minor VII 9:22 
    VII is a Major Chord 9:28 
    Review of Natural Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree 9:36 
   Harmonic Minor i 10:44 
    Review of Harmonic Minor Scale 10:52 
   Harmonic Minor ii0 12:00 
   Harmonic Minor III+ 12:08 
    III+ is an Augmented Chord 12:19 
    An Augmented Chord is Made Up of Two Major Intervals 12:31 
   Harmonic Minor iv 12:54 
   Harmonic Minor V 13:08 
   Harmonic Minor VI 13:33 
   Harmonic Minor vii0 13:50 
    Review of Harmonic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree 13:56 
    Listening to the Harmonic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree 14:41 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) i 15:24 
    Review of Melodic Minor Scale 15:33 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) ii 16:43 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) III+ 17:13 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) IV 17:37 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) V 17:57 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) vi0 18:16 
   Melodic Minor (Ascending) vii0 18:43 
    Review of Melodic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree (Ascending) 18:48 
    Listening of Melodic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree (Ascending) 20:06 
   Example 1: Major Scale Chord Notation 21:02 
   Example 2: Natural Minor Scale Chord Notation 22:58 
   Example 3: Harmonic Minor Chord Notation 24:59 
   Example 4: Melodic Minor Chord Notation 26:50 
XIII. Chords and Inversions
  Seventh Chords 16:52
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:11 
   A Seventh Chord is a Triad With An Added Third 0:23 
    Listening to a Seventh Chord 0:35 
    Writing a Seventh Chord on the Staff 1:05 
   Major-Major Seventh Chord, Major Triad + Major Seventh 1:18 
    Listening to a Major-Major Seventh Chord 1:52 
   Major-Minor Seventh Chord, Major Triad + Minor Seventh 2:29 
    Notating a Major-Minor Seventh Chord with a 7 2:48 
    Listening to a Major-Minor Seventh Chord 2:58 
   Minor-Minor Seventh Chord, Minor Triad + Minor Seventh 3:34 
    Listening to a Minor-Minor Seventh Chord 3:55 
    Notating a Minor-Minor Seventh Chord 4:57 
   Half Diminished Seventh Chord, Diminished Triad + Minor Seventh 5:06 
    Writing a Half Diminished Seventh Chord 5:24 
    Listening to a Half Diminished Seventh Chord 5:40 
   Fully Diminished Seventh Chord, Diminished Triad + Diminished Seventh 7:18 
    Writing a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord 7:34 
    Listening to a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord 8:02 
    Notating a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord 8:44 
   Example 1: Major-Major Seventh 9:46 
   Example 2: Major-Minor Seventh 10:50 
   Example 3: Minor-Minor Seventh 11:54 
   Example 4: Half-Diminished Seventh 13:07 
   Example 5: Fully Diminished Seventh 14:42 
  Chord Inversions 22:51
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Objectives 0:07 
   Root Position Triad (5)/(3) 0:15 
    Root Position G Major 0:33 
    What the 5 and 3 Represent 1:00 
    Figured Bass 1:14 
    Listening to the I Chord 1:55 
    No Need to Write 5/3 2:15 
   First Inversion Triad 6/(3) 2:22 
    Why We Write the 6 but Omit the 3 2:39 
    What First Inversion Means 3:17 
    Listening to the I6 Chord 3:25 
   Second Inversion Triad 6/4 4:21 
    Fifth Note Becomes the Root 4:29 
    What the 6 and the 4 Represent 4:42 
    Listening to the I6/4 Chord 5:30 
   Root Position Seventh Chord 7 6:47 
    I7 Represents a Seventh Chord 6:55 
    Listening to the I7 Chord 7:31 
   First Inversion Seventh Chord 6/5/(3) 7:45 
    Moving the Tonic to the Top to Create a First Inversion Seventh Chord 8:03 
    Explanation of Notation 6/5 8:18 
    Listening to the I6/5 Chord 9:55 
   Second Inversion Seventh Chord (6)/4/3 11:14 
    Moving the Tonic and Submediant to the Top to Create the Second Inversion Seventh Chord 11:25 
    Explanation of Notation 4/3 11:52 
    Listening to the I4/3 Chord 13:27 
   Third Inversion Seventh Chord (6)/4/2 14:08 
    Moving the Tonic, Submediant, and Dominant to the Top to Create a Third Inversion Seventh Chord 14:20 
    Listening to the I4/2 Chord 15:05 
   Example 1: A Major Root Position 15:47 
   Example 2: A Major First Inversion 16:03 
   Example 3: A Major Second Inversion 16:25 
   Example 4: V7 17:48 
   Example 5: V6/5 18:27 
   Example 6: V6/4/3 18:59 
   Example 7: V6/4/2 19:38