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INSTRUCTORS Carleen Eaton Grant Fraser Eric Smith
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For more information, please see full course syllabus of Algebra 1
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  • Table of Contents

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Lecture Comments (2)

0 answers

Post by Aurrora Greening on September 18, 2011

I would find it easier to understand, especially at 9:58, if instead of going back to the square root function, you explained the domain and range a little more.

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Post by Caroline Rodgers on September 19, 2009

I think this is an excellent course, but I found one small discrepancy distracting: In real life, the second and subsequent ounces of postage costs less than the first ounce.

Functions and Graphs

  • A function is a rule in which each value assigned to the function (each input) produces exactly one output.

  • Functions are graphed on the coordinate plane.

  • The input value is called the independent variable and the output is called the dependent variable.

  • A relation is a set of ordered pairs. The set of all first terms is called the domain of the relation. The set of second terms is called the range of the relation.

  • A discrete function has a graph consisting of isolated points that are not connected.

  • A continuous function has a graph that is a smooth curve or line.

Functions and Graphs

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Functions 0:30
    • Definition
    • Example: Square Roots
    • Example: Gas Prices
  • Graphs 4:03
    • Definition
    • Example: Square Roots
  • Domain and Range 9:30
    • Definition
    • Example: Square Roots
  • Lecture Example 1 11:22
  • Lecture Example 2 13:58
  • Additional Example 3
  • Additional Example 4