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INSTRUCTORS Carleen Eaton Grant Fraser Eric Smith
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For more information, please see full course syllabus of Algebra 1
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Lecture Comments (1)

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Post by Jeanette Akers on January 22, 2012

This presentation really helped me, for I have never had the method of building a table to help determine the correct factors explained to me before. After watching and listening to this lecture, I tried working similar problems in my textbook (the odd numbered ones) and I checked my answers against the answers provided in the back of the textbook; all of my answers were correct. Thanks for teaching this concept.

Factoring General Trinomials

  • To factor a trinomial with a leading coefficient which is not 1, use trial and error to find the binomial factors.

  • Remember that the signs of the constant terms of the factors are based on the signs of the linear and constant terms of the trinomial. Review the material in the previous section to understand these ideas.

  • Keep in mind that not every trinomial factors into two binomial factors. Trinomials that do not are called prime trinomials.

  • You can solve some quadratic equations by factoring the trinomial and then using the zero product property

Factoring General Trinomials

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Factoring Trinomials 0:40
    • Example: List
  • Grouping 5:46
    • Example
  • Rules for Signs 9:04
    • Example
  • Greatest Common Factor (GCF) 10:29
  • Prime Polynomials 11:03
    • Example
  • Solving Equations 12:32
  • Lecture Example 1 13:11
  • Lecture Example 2 18:37
  • Additional Example 3
  • Additional Example 4