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INSTRUCTORS Carleen Eaton Grant Fraser Eric Smith
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For more information, please see full course syllabus of Algebra 1
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Lecture Comments (3)

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Post by Roman Kozulin on August 27, 2012

I hate it when he teaches us to start with moving everything to the left leaving a 0 on the right and then goes ahead and does something like Ex.3 !

I got the right answer but still very confusing.

1 answer

Last reply by: Mark Mccraney
Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:07 PM

Post by Mark Mccraney on December 14, 2009

Even though this section is on factoring perfect square, it's cleaner to set equation to zero, pull GCF, factor, done.

Factoring Perfect Squares

  • The special rules for factoring a perfect square trinomial are a2 + 2ab + b2 = (a + b)(a + b) and a2 - 2ab + b2 = (a - b)(a - b).

  • Learn to recognize perfect square trinomials in more complicated forms. This is an important skill you will need in later work in this course.

  • Some polynomials require several methods to be factored completely. Always start by finding the Greatest Common Factor. Then try other methods.

  • You can solve some quadratic equations by factoring the trinomial and then using the zero product property.

  • The square root property states that if x2 = n, then x = √n or x = -√n. You can use this property to solve some quadratic equations.

Factoring Perfect Squares

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Perfect Squares 0:10
    • Perfect Square Trinomials
  • Solving Equations 2:53
    • Square Root Property
    • Example
  • Lecture Example 1 4:23
  • Lecture Example 2 6:56
  • Additional Example 3
  • Additional Example 4