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John Snape

John Snape

Introduction to Databases

Slide Duration:

Table of Contents

I. Introduction
Introduction Hello World

15m 5s

Declaring Variables

47m 26s

Accepting Input

13m 17s

Operators, Expressions and Statements

40m 8s

Program Flow Control

31m 44s

Iterations & Looping

24m 43s

Working with Strings

53m 6s

Formatting Strings for Output

16m 24s

Helper Methods

28m 40s

Enumerations & Structures

8m 39s

Commenting & Documenting Code

8m 48s

Arrays, Stacks, Queues & Dictionaries

41m 29s

Generic Lists & Collections

14m 24s

Variable Scope

10m 38s

Reading & Writing Files

25m 10s

Dates & Times

12m 22s

Random Numbers

5m 29s

Handling Exceptions

14m 45s

Environment Variables

8m 21s

Command Line Arguments

10m 43s

The CD Inventory Program So Far

34m 16s

II. Object Oriented Programming
Introduction to Object Oriented Programming

1h 2m 20s

Understanding & Creating Classes

26m 6s

Understanding Interfaces & Abstract Classes

20m 12s

Static vs. Instance Members

16m 24s

Understanding Inheritance

32m 59s

Understanding Polymorphism

14m 58s

Understanding Delegates

22m

Reading & Understanding Code

35m 49s

Creating a Data Type

29m 21s

Unified Modeling Language & Class Diagrams

23m 5s

The CD Inventory Program Upgraded with Classes

20m 33s

III. GUI Programming
Introduction to GUI Programming

39m 19s

All About Forms

40m 7s

Handling Form Events

15m 22s

Informational Controls

27m 44s

Command Controls

36m 23s

Grouping Controls

26m 44s

Text Editing Controls

25m 7s

List Selection Controls

37m 45s

Setting Options Controls

21m 20s

Dialog Controls

22m 21s

Graphic Display Controls

35m 37s

Date Setting Controls

15m 53s

Other Controls

17m 33s

Using the Clipboard

7m 28s

Sending Email

25m 16s

Some Sample Programs

38m 31s

Our CD Inventory Program Upgraded with Forms

15m 16s

IV. Databases
Introduction to Databases

34m 7s

SQL Server Management Studio & Northwind Database

8m 11s

SELECT Statement

31m 24s

UPDATE & DELETE Statements

16m 56s

INSERT Statement

11m 48s

Creating a Database from Scratch

44m 54s

Querying Lists with LINQ

20m 42s

Using Databound Controls

14m 22s

Our CD Inventory Program Upgraded with a Database

10m 50s

V. Conclusion
Where to Go from Here

19m 48s

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Lecture Comments (1)

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Post by Carl Scaglione on September 22, 2017

At he 8 minute mark of this lecture, the person to whom you refer was E. F. Codd (1923-2003).  He was seminal in developing the database normalization forms; there three basic forms with others for greater rigor in database design. There are the 12 rules for database design.  And finally, there the famous mnemonic to remember the crux of these rules:  The key, the whole key, and nothing but the key, so help me Codd.

Introduction to Databases

  • An entity is the smallest unit of information in a database
  • A Table is used to hold one type of data and can be related to other tables
  • A column in a table holds one piece of data type shared by all records, also called an “attribute”
  • A row holds all data related to one entity, also called a “record”
  • A relational database defines how data relate to each other
  • A domain constrains a column to a specific data type, i.e. int or string
  • A primary key is unique within a table and uniquely identifies a record
  • A foreign key is a primary key from another table
  • Stored Procedures are methods stored directly in the database that work on data in the database
    • They allow you to enforce business rules within your database
  • Cardinality defines the type of relationship between a table and a foreign key: One-to-One, One-to-Many or Many-to-Many
  • Optionality tells whether the relationship is mandatory or optional
  • Referential Integrity makes sure changes in one table don’t negatively affect another table
  • Database normalization allow you to optimize your database by minimizing redundancy and dependency
  • Structured Query Language (SQL) is a special-purpose programming language designed for querying and manipulating databases
  • The Microsoft version is called T-SQL
  • There are two types of queries you can make:
    • Data Definition Language (DDL) which defines and updates the structure of the data
    • Data Manipulation Language (DML) which allows you to create, modify or delete data using four keywords:
      • CREATE e.g. CREATE TABLE Employee
      • SELECT e.g. SELECT * FROM Customers
      • SET e.g. SET ZipCode = “00000” WHERE…
      • DELETE e.g. DELETE * FROM Customers WHERE…
  • The ACID test defines a valid database transaction
    • Atomicity - Each transaction is “all or nothing”
    • Consistency – Any transaction should bring the database from one valid state to another
    • Isolation – Concurrent transactions are the same as serial transactions
    • Durability – Once a transaction is committed, it stays committed
  • Standard database design follows the following steps:
    • Determine entities involved and create a table for each type
    • Determine Primary Key for each table
    • Determine non-key attributes
    • Determine relationships between tables
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