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For more information, please see full course syllabus of AP Physics C/Electricity and Magnetism
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Lecture Comments (10)

1 answer

Last reply by: Suresh Sundarraj
Tue Oct 29, 2013 6:48 PM

Post by Laron Burrows on October 24, 2013

At 37:35 did you forget to divide by k??

0 answers

Post by yannick Haberkorn on October 14, 2013

what if the permitivity of free space = 3 or 12 how do you apply coulombs law ?

0 answers

Post by yannick Haberkorn on October 11, 2013

this stuf is hard ... i need this for my electrical engineering class lol . not good man

0 answers

Post by yannick Haberkorn on October 9, 2013

i understand that 0,3 is being squared , but why is it multiplied by 10^-1 ?

1 answer

Last reply by: Rob Escalera
Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:48 AM

Post by Sonalya Jayasuriya on February 15, 2012

Di Jishi in the problem with the two small spheres what happens to the K after you find the equation for q2

2 answers

Last reply by: Bora Basa
Sat Jun 8, 2013 4:12 AM

Post by chris bagwell on August 9, 2011

question: why does this law seem similar to newtons law of gravity?

Related Articles:

Coulomb's Law

  • Coulomb’s law: if two charges q1 and q2 are separated by a distance r, the magnitude of the force between them is F = k |q1| |q2| / r^2; the force is repulsive if both charges are negative or both are positive, and is attractive otherwise.
  • If the force is in Newtons, q1 and q2 in Coulombs, and r in meters, then the constant k that appears in Coulomb’s law is equal to 9 x 10^9 SI units

Coulomb's Law

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Coulomb's Law 0:59
    • Two Point Charges by Distance R
    • Permitivity of Free Space
  • Charges on the Vertices of a Triangle 8:00
    • 3 Charges on Vertices of Right Triangle
    • Charge of 4, -5 and -2 micro-Coulombs
    • Force Acting on Each Charge
  • Charges on a Line 21:29
    • 2 Charges on X-Axis
    • Where Should Q should be Placed, Net Force =0
  • Two Small Spheres Attached to String 31:08
    • Adding Some Charge
    • Equilibrium Net Force on Each Sphere = 0
  • Simple Harmonic Motion of Point Charge 37:40
    • Two Charges on Y-Axis
    • Charge is Attracted
    • Magnitude of Net Force on Q
  • Extra Example 1: Vertices of Triangle
  • Extra Example 2: Tension in String
  • Extra Example 3: Two Conducting Spheres
  • Extra Example 4: Force on Charge