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Lecture Comments (65)

1 answer

Last reply by: Grace Yang
Fri Jul 15, 2016 5:51 PM

Post by Venkata Samba Siva Rao Avula on April 1 at 07:39:53 AM

Hi Mam,

I see you gave me a passage from J.M.Barrie, Peter Pan book.
Its 1st line is, "All children, except one, grow up."

Is this word 'one' after except is not a noun? or it is noun?

0 answers

Post by sherman cox on August 21, 2015

why isn't the professor video isn't playing

0 answers

Post by Carlos Aguilar on February 4, 2015

Do you cover all the rules of the English grammar in these lessons or do you leave aside some of them? I need  know this because I am an ESL student and I am really looking forward on this course to help me improve my English grammar skills. Thanks.

1 answer

Last reply by: Davinder Arora
Wed Sep 24, 2014 6:44 AM

Post by Diana on August 6, 2014

when can i capitalize a common noun?

1 answer

Last reply by: Jules
Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:56 AM

Post by Jackie on July 17, 2014

can we use two pronouns in one sentence

0 answers

Post by Rodrigue Mugenga on July 14, 2014

How the names of people can be proper nouns in the time they are  possessed by various people?

0 answers

Post by Philippe on July 14, 2014

jacob'S dog has been killed.
can u show of the nouns included in the above sentence

0 answers

Post by Philippe on July 14, 2014

How about when you say, for-example, jacob dog's has die?
iwould like to ask you to show me some nouns in the above sentence?Thanks

0 answers

Post by Jules on July 14, 2014

I'm asking,are there other types of names?

0 answers

Post by Amar Pinto on June 4, 2014

Can Proper Nouns be used as common nouns like if a place is the same name as a regular word that is a noun, and you use the word in the same sentence?

0 answers

Post by hyunwoochoi on February 26, 2014

How about numbers?  those are noun? or what?

0 answers

Post by john williams on January 24, 2014

@ DANNO ALLGROVE.you are right.it should be thomas'.Because the name is alreading ending in 's'.what your wife was trying to do is that,she was trying to add 's'( which meaning 3rd person in an expression has to take 's') But,if the 3rd person alreading ending in 's' u dont need to put 's'.you just use apostrophe like you did (thomans').hope you understand me better ?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:49 AM

Post by Andrew Kim on December 29, 2013

And one more: In the the Conan Doyle article, isn't "Lot" Adverb?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:52 AM

Post by Andrew Kim on December 29, 2013

Extra question: What is a Improper Noun?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:57 AM

Post by Andrew Kim on December 29, 2013

I understand Proper and Common noun, but what is Improper Noun?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:56 AM

Post by Andrew Kim on December 29, 2013

Could you tell me how "Way" is a noun?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:05 AM

Post by Ling Huang on December 9, 2013

On the practice slide with finding the noun, why is bunch from bunch of grapes consider concrete? I can't really use my senses for Bunch. Thank you for your help.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:05 AM

Post by Ling Huang on December 9, 2013

Hello, I don't understand why "Way" is consider an idea. Also, why is "day" and "year" consider a thing? Can you please explain? Thank you for your help.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:08 AM

Post by Rahaf Jouriah on November 30, 2013

are the numbers nouns ??

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:14 AM

Post by Rahaf Jouriah on November 30, 2013

(difficulty)is a noun or adverb ??
(fool) isn’t an adjective ??
THANKS

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:14 AM

Post by Rahaf Jouriah on November 30, 2013

(difficulty)is a noun or adverb ??
(fool) isn’t an adjective ??
THANKS

0 answers

Post by Ruth Endicott on September 13, 2013

I love Educator and really enjoy the lessons. Do you know of any free sites that I could use for thorough tests on english grammer, instead of having to pick through the internet universe for each aspect?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Wed Aug 7, 2013 2:37 AM

Post by Lavanya Kanneganti on August 5, 2013

in the phrase "bunch of grapes", what is bunch? is it an adjective?? and what is of?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:08 AM

Post by Amar Pinto on July 11, 2013

How do you know the difference between a common and concrete noun, also is the word brain a concrete and a common noun.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Tue Jul 9, 2013 9:52 PM

Post by Amar Pinto on July 9, 2013

thanks your a good teacher

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Mon Jul 8, 2013 10:58 PM

Post by Amar Pinto on July 8, 2013

for prpoer nouns you are that they are saying they are allways capitilized,also you recomend to remember a noun using the word Jhonstown

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Mon Jul 8, 2013 6:36 PM

Post by abdisalan halane on July 8, 2013

is the word "music" abstract noun?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Mon Jul 8, 2013 6:33 PM

Post by Aniket Dhawan on December 31, 2012

could you please tell me that in noun lesson, why the word 'sour' is not a noun?

3 answers

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Thu Sep 5, 2013 12:38 AM

Post by vito lupis on December 27, 2012

Curious, that the word "strolling is not a noun" but "run" and "jump" are considered nouns; where is the logic in that?

0 answers

Post by Aniket Dhawan on December 17, 2012

Thanks

2 answers

Last reply by: Aimet Ruiz
Wed Feb 6, 2013 4:33 PM

Post by Nathanael Shim on December 3, 2012

The word "patience" is an abstract noun, right?

2 answers

Last reply by: Aimet Ruiz
Wed Feb 6, 2013 4:33 PM

Post by Simon Lee on October 4, 2012

In the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle passage (10:24), why is "nothing" (last sentence), not a noun?

0 answers

Post by Professor Hendershot on September 17, 2012

"Sort" has a variety of meanings in English. It's most commonly used as a noun when it's a synonym for "variety" or "type" (as in "that sort of plant", etc.). In this case, "sort" is describing an idea, and it's not taking the place of another noun (which would make it a pronoun), and so it must be a noun.

Similarly, "lot" and "difficulty" describe abstract concepts. Because English uses nouns to describe persons, places, things, or ideas, idea-words are nouns. "Things", of course, describes things!

Just because a term isn't specific doesn't mean it's not a noun. While your English teacher has probably told you to use specific nouns whenever possible, and it IS better to use more specific terms, sometimes vague terms are the best we can do. Vague nouns are still nouns. Nouns are good for everything!

Does that answer your question?

1 answer

Last reply by: Aimet Ruiz
Wed Feb 6, 2013 4:32 PM

Post by Nathaniel Humphrey on September 16, 2012

Can someone explain why: sort, lot, things, and difficulty are nouns?

0 answers

Post by Samuel Bass on June 24, 2012

nice video! I really like viewing it. English is my second language and its always good to know the base fundamental components of the language.

3 answers

Last reply by: Aimet Ruiz
Wed Feb 6, 2013 4:30 PM

Post by Danno Allgrove on June 19, 2012

We have a restaurant in our town called, "Thomas' Diner." My wife insists that the pronunciation of this is 'Thomases' where I believe it is pronounced 'Thomas'.

Which one of us is correct, please?

Nouns

  • A noun is a name for a person, place or thing.
  • Singular nouns describe single items; plural nouns name multiple items.
  • Collective nouns are singular nouns that name groups of items: choir, team, squad, etc.
  • Concrete nouns name items that can be perceived with the senses (cat, water, etc.); abstract nouns name items that cannot be perceived with the senses (mercy, sadness, etc.).
  • Proper nouns are capitalized and name specific people, places, and things; common nouns are not capitalized and name non-specific people, places, and things.
  • Count nouns can be singular or plural and name things that can be counted; non-count nouns are always singular and name things that cannot be counted.

Nouns

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:06
  • What is a Noun? 0:31
    • Where it Comes From
    • Definition
    • Think Johnstown
  • Find the Nouns Practice 1:04
  • Find the Nouns Answers 1:29
  • Singular and Plural Nouns 1:58
    • Singular Nouns
    • Plural Nouns
  • Singular and Plural Nouns Examples 2:26
    • Ends in S Sound
  • Collective Nouns 2:54
    • Definition
    • Treated as Singular Nouns
  • Collective Nouns Examples 3:20
  • Concrete and Abstract Nouns 3:46
    • Concrete Nouns
    • Abstract Nouns
    • Concrete Nouns Examples
    • Abstract Nouns Examples
  • Proper and Common Nouns 5:14
    • Proper Nouns
    • Common Nouns
    • Capitalization
  • Proper and Common Nouns Examples 6:06
  • Count and Non-Count Nouns 6:30
    • Count Nouns
    • Non-Count Nouns
    • Examples
  • Find the Nouns Practice 7:44
  • Find the Nouns Answers 8:25
  • Find the Nouns Practice 1 10:34
  • Find the Nouns Answers 2 11:12