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Lecture Comments (12)

2 answers

Last reply by: Rosa Avila
Tue Nov 19, 2013 9:14 AM

Post by Rosa Avila on October 13, 2013

If I had won a million dollars, I would have quit my job. If you had thought more about the feeling of others, you might have had more friends in school.

In the above examples that you gave for something that didn’t happen in the past, you say to use the past participle form of the main verb in the “then” clause, but aren’t you using the present perfect tense (have quit, have had)? Wouldn’t the past participle form just have quit and not have quit. Example: If I had won a million dollars, I would quit my job.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sun Jun 23, 2013 3:36 PM

Post by Vanessa Pieper on June 23, 2013

Hi, I have a doubt. If perfect means completed, wouldn't that definition fit the simple past too?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat May 4, 2013 4:15 PM

Post by Gift Nitchie on May 4, 2013

Hi! Is it ok to say "had had" in the sentence "If I had had time I would have gone to the football match." I have seen an article with this sentence as an example for the third conditional. Is "third conditional" the other term for the condition in the past that didn't happen?

Thanks

4 answers

Last reply by: Ali Atri
Fri May 9, 2014 11:22 PM

Post by success10 on March 19, 2013

Hi! Is the subjunctive of the verb to be "were" even for he, she, or it?

Conditional Tenses & Subjunctive Mood

  • Conditional tenses are used to express what we would do or what would happen.
  • Conditional tenses have two parts: a subordinating “if” clause (the condition) and an independent “then” clause (the result). Verb forms vary according to the kind of statement being made.
  • If your statement states a conditional fact, use the simple present in the “if” clause and the simple present in the “then” clause.
  • If your statement makes a prediction, use the simple present in the “if” clause and will, can, may, should, or might with the base form of the main verb in the “then” clause.
  • If your sentence speculates about something unlikely to happen, use the past tense in the “if” clause and could, might, or would with the base form of the verb in the “then” clause.
  • If your sentence speculates about something that didn’t happen in the past, use the past perfect in the “if” clause and could have, might have, or would have with the past participle form of the main verb in the “then” clause.
  • if your sentence speculates about something that’s contrary to fact, use were (the subjunctive) in the “if” clause and could, might, or would with the base form of the verb in the “then” clause.
  • The subjunctive mood uses the base form for all verbs in the present tense, except to be, which uses were for the subjunctive.
  • Use the subjunctive mood to describe something wished for, requested, or contrary to fact.

Conditional Tenses & Subjunctive Mood

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:09
  • What are Conditional Tenses? 0:27
    • Definition
    • Two Parts
  • Conditional Tenses 1:13
    • If Your Statement States a Conditional Fact
    • Examples
    • If Your Statement Makes a Prediction
    • Examples
    • If Your Sentence Speculates About Something Unlikely to Happen
    • Examples
    • If Your Sentence Speculates About Something That Didn't Happen
    • Examples
    • If Your Sentence Speculates About Somethings That's Contrary to Fact
    • Examples
  • The Subjunctive Mood 5:09
    • Moods are Different From Tenses
    • When Subjunctive Mood is Used
    • Use to Describe Somethings Wished For
    • Use to Describe Somethings Requested
    • Use to Describe Somethings Contrary to Fact
  • Use the Correct Tense Practice 6:33
  • Use the Correct Tense Answers 7:08
  • Use the Correct Tense Practice 2 8:15
  • Use the Correct Tense Answers 2 8:56