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For more information, please see full course syllabus of AP English Literature & Composition
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Lecture Comments (3)

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Post by Jingwei Xie on January 10, 2015

Hi Ms. Hendershot,

I currently taking AP Lit at my school. When we were doing multiple choice questions, I think I really lack the ability to analyze literary techniques and figurative meanings of words and sentences. Would this kind of skill overlap with the information in your AP Lang lessons? Are they relevant?

Thank you!

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Post by Suzanne Rogers on April 8, 2014

Curious. This does not appear to be an AP type question.
Unless, extract means text.  This test is about the AP English Literature test.

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Post by Binod Limbu on March 18, 2014

In my exam there will be a question that has to be answered using the extract. Can you please tell me which lectures should I watch that will help me answer that type of questions?
the questions are like this:
- What do we learn about the character of Larry from this extract?
- What language does the writer use to represent the character of larry?

Introduction

  • Why Does This Test Exist?
    • The AP English Literature & Composition exam is designed to test your ability to understand and interpret English literature—mostly prose and poetry.
    • It tests the skills you’d be expected to develop in a first-year English literature class (or any class in literature translated into English), and a 4 or a 5 on the exam is often worth as much college credit as one of those classes.
  • What’s on the Test?
    • The test is divided into two sections.
    • Section I – Multiple Choice (60 minutes): This section asks you about 55 multiple-choice questions about 4 or 5 poetry and prose passages (10 to 15 questions per passage).
      • It is worth 45 percent of your grade.
    • Section II– Essays (120 minutes: This section asks you to write three essays:
      • An analysis of poetry (40 minutes to write an essay about a poem or pair of poems provided by the test)
      • An analysis of prose (40 minutes to write an essay on a story, novel excerpt, or essay provided by the test)
      • An open essay (40 minutes to write an essay on a literary topic provided by the test, using anything you’ve already read).
  • How is the Test Scored?
    • The multiple-choice section awards points for correct answers. There is no penalty for guessing.
    • Each of your three essays is scored by a different essay reader (one who specializes in that kind of essay). ETS says that the reader of your open essay will be familiar with the work you choose as your subject (so an essay about Hamlet will go to a reader familiar with Hamlet).
      • Essays are scored from 0 to 9, with 9 being the highest score. Essay scoring is “holistic”, which means better scores go to overall better essays—clearly written essays that display good ideas, strong support, and good English mechanics (spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, etc.).
  • What Does All That Mean?
    • Basically, you want to get at least 30 questions out of 55 right on the multiple-choice section and at least 5 out of 9 points on each of the essays. That will earn you a score of 3 on the exam, which is the lowest score that generally gets any college credit.
    • Wait. What’s all this stuff about a 3 …?
    • Score How common? Equivalent grade College credit?
      5 – Extremely Qualified 10.07% 90-100 Yes
      4 – Well qualified 20.8% 80-89 Probably
      3 – Qualified 29.3% 70-79 Maybe
      2 – Possibly qualified 27.6% 60-69 Very Rarely
      1 – Not qualified 11.6% F No
  • How This Course Will Work
    • Introduction
      • Intro lesson (hi!)
      • Literary movements at lightspeed
      • Reading list
      • Literary criticism for idiots
    • Multiple Choice
      • Passages
      • Question types
      • Prose passages
      • Poetry passages
    • The Essays
      • Intro
      • The prose essay
      • The poetry essay
      • The open essay
      • How to use Hamlet for everything
    • The Walkthrough
      • Multiple-choice walkthrough (parts 1 and 2)
      • Prose essay walkthrough
      • Poetry essay walkthrough
      • Open essay walkthrough
    • Bonus Unit: Shakespeare
      • Comedies
      • Tragedies
      • Histories
      • Other commonly assigned plays
      • Sonnets
  • How This Course Will Work
    • That’s right—there are two!
    • The AP English Literature and Composition exam (the one this course is designed to prepare you for) tests your ability to understand and interpret English literature. It’s roughly equivalent to a freshman English lit class in college.
    • The AP English Language and Composition exam (which is covered in a different course) tests your ability to understand and write reasoned arguments—rhetoric, basically. It’s roughly equivalent to a freshman writing class in college.
    • Make sure you’re watching the right course, and taking the right test!

Introduction

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:10
  • Why Does This Test Exist? 0:36
    • Designed to test your ability to understand and interpret English literature
    • Tests skills you'll develop in a first-year English literature class
    • Worth college credit if you score a 4 or 5 on the exam
  • What's on the Test? 1:12
    • Section I - Multiple Choice
    • Section II - Essays
    • Poetry
    • Prose
    • Open Essay
  • How is the Test Scored? 2:50
    • There is no penalty for guessing
    • Each essay is scored by a different reader
    • Essay's scored from 0 to 9
  • What Does All That Mean? 4:30
    • You want to get 30 out of 55 right on multiple choice section
    • You want to get at least 5 out of 9 points on each essay
  • How is the Test Scored? (Table) 5:10
  • How This Course Will Work 6:30
    • Introduction
    • Multiple Choice
    • The Essays
    • The Walkthrough
    • Bonus Unit: Shakespeare