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Lecture Comments (15)

1 answer

Last reply by: Muhammad Asad Ullah MOAVIA
Tue May 12, 2015 5:57 PM

Post by Muhammad Asad Ullah MOAVIA on May 12, 2015

Dear Professor,
Can I use the "Oxford Comma" in a scientific paper?

0 answers

Post by Gisele D on March 20, 2014

Just a follow-up to my question above.

1 answer

Last reply by: Gisele D
Wed Mar 12, 2014 4:50 AM

Post by Gisele D on March 12, 2014

In one of the slides, it is written that we should "use a comma between city and state, and after state if the state isn't an acronym"; however, one of the provided practice questions lists a city and country within the same sentence. You used a comma between the city and country, but not between the country and the following word. Why is this? Is there a distinction between comma usage between and following cities and states, and cities and countries?

Furthermore, while I have your attention, may I ask whether the period is correctly placed in the following sentence or should it be to the left of the closing quotation marks?

In one of the slides, it is written that we should "use a comma between city and state, and after state if the state isn't an acronym".

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:34 AM

Post by Rosa Avila on January 10, 2014

You still like me, don't you?

I use a free online sentence diagrammer (Reed Kellogg) to analyze sentences. For the above sentence, it shows it as two separate sentences "You still like me." and "You don't." connecting both sentences with a dotted line. The diagrammer says that the second sentence is a tag question. The above sentence looks like a comma splice to me. Can you explain?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:35 AM

Post by Rosa Avila on January 10, 2014

Is a dependent clause always a weak clause?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:37 AM

Post by Rosa Avila on January 10, 2014

It was, I think, the happiest day of my life.
In the above sentence how does "I think" function in the sentence? It looks like it could be a independent sentence because it has a subject (I) and a verb (think).

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:06 AM

Post by Eric Nshimiyimana on December 1, 2013

I wonder if we can put a commas around an interrupters like finally when it end a sentence.For example, she decide to stay home,finally.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:18 PM

Post by Beverly Terry on September 25, 2013

Under the dusty, old bed, a mangy, old tomcat lived.

That's how I answered, and can now see that there are too many commas in the sentence; nonetheless, is it grammatically correct?

Commas

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:07
  • Commas 0:21
    • Commas Indicate Pauses Within Sentences
  • Rules for Commas 1:05
    • Commas Separate Words and Word Groups in a Series of Three or More
    • Oxford Commas
    • Use Commas Surrounding the Name or Title of a Person Being Addressed
    • Use Commas to Separate Two Adjectives when 'and' can be Inserted Between Them
    • Use Commas when an -ly adjective is Used with Other Adjectives
    • Use Commas to Separate the Day of the Month from the Year
    • Use Commas Between City and State
    • Use Commas to Surround Degrees or Titles Used with Names
    • Use Commas to Set Off Expressions that Interrupt Sentence Flow
    • Use Commas After Weak Clauses that Begin Sentences
    • Use Commas After Phrases of More than Three Words that Begin Sentences
    • Use Commas to Surround Nonessential Descriptions
    • Use Commas to Separate Two Strong Clauses Joined by a Coordinating Conjunction
    • Use Commas to Separate Two Independent Clauses To Avoid Confusion
    • Comma Splices
    • Run-On Sentences
    • If Subject Doesn't Appear in Front of Second Verb, Don't Use Comma
    • Use Commas to Introduce or Interrupt Quotations Shorter than Three Lines
    • Use Commas to Separate Statements from Questions and Contrasting Parts
    • Use Commas When Beginning Sentences With Introductory Words
    • Use Commas to Surround Interrupters
    • Use Either Commas or Semicolons before Introductory Words When Followed by Series of Items
  • Comma Practice 15:20
  • Comma Practice Answers 16:11