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Lecture Comments (51)

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Thu Mar 31, 2016 2:11 PM

Post by Adiam Ghebre on March 28 at 09:04:06 PM

Good lecture! Is it possible for you to do an example with alkenes and the double bond is between two carbons?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Mon Oct 12, 2015 1:14 AM

Post by sania sarwar on October 10, 2015

Hi Dr Starkey,
thanks for the lectures, they are really helpful.A question that I wasn't sure of is that in example 2 the benzene ring is a singlet so if CH2 is attached to it, wouldn't that make it a triplet?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sat Jul 19, 2014 10:28 PM

Post by John Subaitani on July 17, 2014

So are we saying that the H-NMR for C10 H14 is para or can it be para, meta. or ortho?

2 answers

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sat Jul 12, 2014 10:32 AM

Post by Francesco Frigo on July 10, 2014

Hello dr. Starkey, at minute 93:41 you define the signal given by proton A as a "clear triplet". But wouldn't proton A couple with Hb with some J value and with Hc with some different J value (since Hb and Hc are chemically different)? So in the end wouldn't this signal look like a doublet of triplets ? Maybe it wouldn't actually be easy to notice since the J values are so similiar but at least we could see some jagged peaks, right?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sat Mar 22, 2014 12:08 AM

Post by in gi seo on March 20, 2014

Are we not going to cover DEPT NMR????

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:59 AM

Post by saima khwaja on March 13, 2014

Hello Dr. Starkey,

If it wasn't for your lectures there is no way I would understand this part of organic chemistry.  My professor goes really fast and these lectures help me to clarify things in my head.  Thank You!

2 answers

Last reply by: Calin Cochran
Sun Mar 9, 2014 8:40 PM

Post by Calin Cochran on March 4, 2014

Hi Professor Starkey!

I know I've told you before, but your lecturing abilities are phenomenal! I can't thank you enough for all the help you have given me!

I do have a quick question. My professor for Organic 2 has clumped the second half of NMR, Ketones, Aldehydes, Carbohydrates, and Carboxylic Acids together for our upcoming exam. Your lectures have helped tremendously with all, but I'm a little lacking on the carbohydrates. I wasn't sure if I may have missed it somewhere on this website or we just don't cover it on here.

If you have any guidance, I would appreciate it tremendously! Thanks so much!

Calin Cochran

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sun Feb 23, 2014 5:27 PM

Post by Jia Cheong on February 22, 2014

You are the best!!!!! Be my lecturer! :)

3 answers

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:37 PM

Post by Udoka Ofoedu on February 17, 2014

hey dr. starkey ,
Why did u choose hb for only a germinal j value. it has a vicinal j value too ? Please why did u not split that ? Thanks

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sun Jan 12, 2014 12:23 AM

Post by Mike Anderson on January 11, 2014

Is there a way to select a lecture and be able to listen to just a part of it?  For example it seems if I want to go back the next day and listen to the second part of a lecture, I have to listen to the whole first half of it first.

Thanks

Mike Anderson

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:30 PM

Post by Joel Barrett on October 28, 2013

Professor Starkey, you are wonderful. I saw your YouTube videos as well. Your hard work is appreciated. I love o-chem just a little bit more because of your videos ;)

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sun Jul 21, 2013 10:52 PM

Post by Amy Lin on July 21, 2013

Hi Dr Starkey,  I don't have a question. I finished all the lectures and I can't express how much of a help it has been. Your lectures have been really concise and you break it down in a way I can finally understand and work through. I have always had a horrible time with Chemistry and this is the first time I actually feel like I can do this.  (And that is a lot given how many times I had to retake Chem...) I am done my subscription and I just wanted to tell you what a big help you have been.  Thank you so much.  !!!

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Wed Jun 5, 2013 10:44 PM

Post by Heidi Schmeck on June 5, 2013

Dr. Starkey:

Just a quick note to thank you for your informative and engaging lectures. I used educator.com and your lab tutorials (Cal Poly Pomona) as supplemental sources to reinforce my understanding of my Organic Chemistry II coursework. Your detailed and clear explanations of complex concepts helped me earn an "A" in both lecture and lab. Thank you! :)

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Mon Feb 25, 2013 10:24 PM

Post by Ryan Rod on February 25, 2013

Hi, did you also cover(including IR and NMR of them), Ethers , Epoxides, and Sulfides? how about Aromatic compounds?
Sorry I have an exam and panicking!

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:42 PM

Post by José Menéndez on February 19, 2013

Hello Dr. Starkey, I wanted to know if you have a mass spectrometry lecture? Thanks.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:44 PM

Post by Ryan Rod on February 18, 2013

What about Carbon NMR?? did I miss it, or have you not covered it?

BTW,

Your are a AMAZING!!

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sun Feb 17, 2013 5:35 PM

Post by Amirnikan Eghbali on February 17, 2013

Thanks and a suggestion, it's better if you label doublet triplet etc with small letters (s,d,t) and the other A, B, C, D... that you use for identification with capital letters to avoid confusion.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Fri Dec 14, 2012 11:23 AM

Post by Marina Bossi on December 12, 2012

Hi Professor Starkey,
I am confused about labelling some functional groups in certain areas of the spectrum where multiple groups can be found. For instance, methyl groups are found at 10-30 and methylene groups at 15-55. How would I know the difference?

Thanks

2 answers

Last reply by: alister guerrero
Wed Nov 7, 2012 4:02 PM

Post by alister guerrero on November 4, 2012

Hi, I just got my account. i was wondering if there is a way to download all the slides together? Thank You

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:33 PM

Post by Gabriella Kaminer-Levin on July 5, 2012

Dear Dr. Starkey:

How can one distinguish between two closely spaced singlets, and a doublet with a large coupling constant (J value)? At 73:30 you examine a doublet with a large coupling constant, but how can one be certain that it is a doublet with a large coupling constant rather than two closely spaced singlets (since in this case examining the ratios does not help)?
Also, do you have any lectures on Mass Spectrometry? I wasn't sure whether they are included in the course and I just wasn't able to locate it in the Table of Contents.
Thank you again for your clear presentation of the material!

Gabriella

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Mon Apr 9, 2012 11:34 PM

Post by Ghazal Fata on April 7, 2012

Dear Professor,
First of all, I wanted to thank you for the great lectures you provide.
Second, I was wondering if the 13C-NMR is going to be thought in a more complex way in Educator. The organic chem I am enrolled in emphasizes a lot more on how to read 13C-NMR without the help of IR or 1H-NMR and it's really complicated and I'd appreciate it if you provide more videos for us, or just refer me to a place which I can find helpful information.
My course actually emphasizes on how different fragments of molecules appear on NMR and which bonds are cleaved and molecular ions are created.
Thank you so much,
Ghazal F

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Tue Mar 27, 2012 11:23 PM

Post by Robert Shaw on March 23, 2012

Dr Starkey, My NMR table has aldehydes listed as 9.5 to 9.9 yet yours shows it at just over 8. Which is correct?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Starkey
Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:06 PM

Post by Jason Jarduck on January 20, 2012

Hi DR starkey,

I have a question about an NMR.

I only have hydrogen NMR with a d20 shake.
The question is stating that 3200 - 3500 which specifies an alcohol group.
NO OTHER IR INFO.
NO C NMR spcetrum is given
Find compound A, only H NMR spectrum
ION IS 84M/Z
USED SULFURIC ACID IN AN ELIMANTION REACTION to form an alkene
FIND COMPUND B, only H NMR spectrum
This is an assignment question!!!

I also have the multiplicities for the hydrogens for compound A and B. How many carbons?

I'M CURRENTLY TAKING ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 AND THAN I WILL BE TAKING ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 LATER.

What would be the best strategy to solve this problem!!! Also where can I find a chart with all energy levels in Joules.

I enjoy your lecture alot and I'm in a hurry because I have a lab to do for Wensday and I must have this question done for Monday.

Thank you

Jason Jarduck

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, Part II

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • ¹H NMR Problem-Solving Strategies 0:18
    • Step 1: Analyze IR Spectrum (If Provided)
    • Step 2: Analyze Molecular Formula (If Provided)
    • Step 3: Draw Pieces of Molecule
    • Step 4: Confirm Piecs
    • Step 5: Put the Pieces Together!
    • Step 6: Check Your Answer!
  • Examples 9:17
    • Example 1: Determine the Structure of a C₉H₁₀O₂ Compound with the Following ¹H NMR Data
    • Example 2: Determine the Structure of a C₉H₁₀O₂ Compound with the Following ¹H NMR Data
  • ¹H NMR Practice 20:57
    • ¹H NMR Practice 1: C₁₀H₁₄
    • ¹H NMR Practice 2: C₄H₈O₂
    • ¹H NMR Practice 3: C₆H₁₂O₃
    • ¹H NMR Practice 4: C₈H₁₈
  • More About Coupling Constants (J Values) 57:11
    • Vicinal (3-bond) and Geminal (2-bond)
    • Cyclohexane (ax-ax) and Cyclohexane (ax-eq) or (eq-eq)
    • Geminal (Alkene), Cis (Alkene), and Trans (Alkene)
    • Allylic (4-bond) and W-coupling (4-bond) (Rigid Structures Only)
  • ¹H NMR Advanced Splitting Patterns 1:05:39
    • Example 1: ¹H NMR Advanced Splitting Patterns
    • Example 2: ¹H NMR Advanced Splitting Patterns
    • Example 3: ¹H NMR Advanced Splitting Patterns
  • ¹H NMR Practice 1:22:53
    • ¹H NMR Practice 5: C₁₁H₁₇N
    • ¹H NMR Practice 6: C₉H₁₀O
  • ¹³C NMR Spectroscopy 1:44:49
    • ¹³C NMR Spectroscopy
  • ¹³C NMR Chemical Shifts 1:47:24
    • ¹³C NMR Chemical Shifts Part 1
    • ¹³C NMR Chemical Shifts Part 2
  • ¹³C NMR Practice 1:50:16
    • ¹³C NMR Practice 1
    • ¹³C NMR Practice 2