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Rebekah Hendershot

Rebekah Hendershot

Outlining

Slide Duration:

Table of Contents

I. Application Essays
Overview

11m 8s

Intro
0:00
First Things First
0:08
Don't Panic!
0:39
Lesson Overview
1:31
What They Aren't Looking For
2:10
Perfection
2:15
Genius
2:45
Flattery
3:16
What They Are Looking For
3:48
Preparation
3:52
Talent
4:47
Fit
5:26
How This Course Will Work
6:42
Remember the Balance Beam
8:37
Balance Beam Story
8:47
The Prompt

18m 20s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:07
Experience Prompts
0:55
Example 1
1:03
Example 2
1:11
Example 3
1:17
Influence Prompts
1:31
Select a Creative Work
1:46
Analysis Prompts
2:34
Examples
2:45
Explanation Prompts
3:11
Examples
3:23
'What If?' Prompts
4:08
Examples
4:19
What These Prompts Have in Common
4:47
You Can Write About Things Before You Enter the School
4:51
They All Use Skills Needed in School of Choice
5:40
How to Answer Experience Prompts
5:57
What to Pick
6:19
Example
6:49
How to Answer Influence Prompts
8:13
What to Pick
8:37
Example
9:50
How to Answer Analysis Prompts
10:35
What to Pick
11:02
Example
11:18
How to Answer Explanation Prompts
12:46
What to Pick
13:00
Example
13:33
How to Answer 'What If?' Prompts
14:21
What to Pick
14:26
Example
14:54
When in Doubt
16:28
Choosing a Topic

13m 27s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:07
Read the Prompt
0:39
Kind of Prompt
0:41
Look for Main Idea
1:29
Describe a Character
2:14
Look for the Underlying Theme
3:06
Role Models
4:07
Look for Technical Specifications
5:02
Choose a Topic
6:59
Analyze What You're Given
7:09
How to Analyze a Quote
7:43
Do a Little Research
9:53
Write What You Know
11:25
When in Doubt
12:15
Outlining

15m 39s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:07
What is an Outline?
0:43
A Sample Essay
1:07
Prompt
1:19
Choosing Your Outline Style
1:55
Formal Outline
1:59
Introduction
2:10
Using My Brain
3:28
Advantages
4:39
Disadvantages
5:23
Mnemonic Outline
6:02
A Mnemonic Outline
6:45
Essay
6:56
Introduction
7:05
Thesis
7:16
Body Paragraphs
7:24
Conclusion
8:59
Choosing Your Outline Style
10:47
Advantages
10:49
Disadvantages
11:37
Which Outline is Right for You?
12:25
Use a Formal Outline If…
12:34
Use a Mnemonic Outline If…
13:17
Testing Your Outline
13:55
Test on Yourself
14:02
Test on Someone Else
14:29
When in Doubt
15:06
Writing Part One: The Beginning

18m 12s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
What is a Hook?
1:11
Famous First Sentences
1:26
Example 1
1:31
Example 2
2:21
Example 3
2:39
Example 4
3:22
How to Write a Good Hook
3:56
Start with an Arresting Image
4:04
Use an Idea That Piques Your Interest
6:06
Use Surprise
8:37
Have Fun!
10:09
Your Thesis Statement
11:27
How to Find Your Thesis Statement
11:46
Make a List of Strongest Ideas
11:54
Thesis Will be the Idea You Can Write About Most Ably
12:12
Where to Place Your Thesis Statement
12:47
In a Traditional Essay
12:52
First Sentence in Essay
14:06
At the End
14:58
When in Doubt
17:05
Writing Part Two: The Middle & End

14m 7s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:13
The Three Parts of a Good Essay
0:58
The Middle: Details, Details, Details!
1:15
Middle
1:40
Structure Correctly
2:02
Pacing is Key!
3:30
How to Write a Winning Conclusion
5:43
Good Conclusion
6:07
Echoes
6:33
Callbacks
6:45
Best Conclusions Evolve From Theses
7:09
Essay Example
8:18
Essay Example Continued
8:39
Have Fun!
10:28
When in Doubt
12:21
Revision

14m 35s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:07
Take a Break!
1:02
Revision vs. Proofreading
1:27
Revision
1:36
Proofreading
1:54
Deep Revision
2:25
What Is It?
2:28
Did You Answer the Prompt?
2:58
Did You Choose the Right Topic?
3:45
Did You Organize Your Answer Well?
4:21
Did You Leave Out Anything Important?
5:07
Did You Pad Your Response?
6:50
Get a Second Opinion
7:36
Beta Reader
8:21
Writing Circle
9:40
The 90/ 10 Rule of Second Opinions
12:11
What Is It?
12:25
When in Doubt
13:49
After You've Written

12m 31s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:08
Proofreading
0:51
Definition
1:07
Mark Errors
1:16
Spelling, Grammar, & Mechanics
2:20
Check Your Spelling
2:24
Check Your Grammar
2:51
Check the Mechanics of Your Writing
3:26
Use Human Eyes
4:01
Proofreading Resources
4:55
Style Manuals
5:01
Stylebooks
5:19
Professionals
6:20
Amateurs
6:38
Sending in Your Essay
6:56
The Stupid Check
7:08
List of Stupid Things You May Have Done
7:32
Send It In
9:43
Rule
10:13
Relax!
10:31
After You Send It It
10:57
Waiting for a Response is Part of the Test
11:26
When in Doubt
11:57
Competitive Schools

14m 29s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:08
Calm Down!
2:13
Similar Essay Questions
2:33
Similar Prompts
3:00
Experience Prompt
3:08
Influence Prompt
3:33
Analysis Prompt
4:28
Explanation Prompt
5:09
'What if?' Prompt
5:56
But Don't Calm Down That Much!
6:38
High-Pressure Environments
6:48
Large Applicant Pools
8:19
How, and When, to Gush
9:33
Be Excited!
9:57
Don't Make Things Up
10:33
Be Yourself & Do Your Best
11:20
When in Doubt
12:58
Specific Fields

14m 43s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
Some Things Don’t Change
1:26
Same General Qualities
1:29
Essay Questions
1:41
Question Types and Examples
2:03
Experience Prompt
2:30
Influence Prompt
2:56
Analysis Prompt
3:49
Explanation Prompt
4:37
'What if?' Prompt
5:17
Do Your Research
6:21
Read the School's Website
6:47
Talk to People
7:27
Craft a Major-Specific Resume
8:38
Emphasize Relevent Parts of Your Background
9:03
Get the Intangibles
9:20
Be Creative
9:55
When in Doubt, Tell a Good Story
12:07
Make a Prioritized List
12:26
Why Good Stories Help
13:19
When in Doubt
13:59
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For more information, please see full course syllabus of Application Essays
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Lecture Comments (5)

0 answers

Post by Austin Cunningham on June 28, 2014

I've been working on an outline for just one of four application essays I have to write for admission to an outrageously competitive school, which has been said to be the number 1 in the nation. The prompt is an explanation prompt, including both why I want to go to the school AND why they should except me (two separate questions in one essay), and I don't know if it would be more effective to start with why I want to go there OR why they should accept me, and I am also not sure how many reasons of each I should give (500 word limit). Do you have any advice as to what I should do? Thank you.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Tue Oct 1, 2013 12:27 PM

Post by carlos bara on September 28, 2013

Professor Hendershot, you're amazing. I really like the way you make things so simple and clear. Please give tips on becoming a better writer please. I freeze all the time. I guess I think to much, and at the end, I end up not expressing properly. Please give me some feedback.

Thank you professor

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Hendershot
Mon Sep 16, 2013 12:51 PM

Post by Kelly Jang on September 16, 2013

I'm kind of familiar with the mnemonic outline, and I use it a lot in my writings. But the thing is, if I'm not so sure about the concept - which means that it's not a safe topic, perhaps like the 'superhero' one you mentioned at the previous lectures -, what outline should I use? Should I use the mnemonic outline since I'm familiar with it and like improvising, or should I use the formal one just to be safe?

Outlining

  • An outline is a written plan for your writing. It may be very elaborate or very simple. Think of an outline as a road map—it shows you where your journey starts, where you’ll go along the way, and where you’ll end up if all goes well.
  • A formal outline is the sort you’ve learned about in school. It has lots of numbers and letters and points and sub-points. It’s a very detailed map.
  • A formal outline has its advantages:
    • It’s very detailed, so it forces you to think about your writing in detail.
    • It’s easy to write from a very detailed plan.
  • A formal outline has its disadvantages, too:
    • It takes a long time to create one
    • Sometimes a too-formal outline will get you so bogged down in details that you lose the big picture.
    • Some writers find it takes the fun out of writing.
  • A mnemonic outline is far less detailed—just jot down whatever you need to remember your main points. It’s like turn-by-turn directions rather than a detailed map.
  • A mnemonic outline has its advantages:
    • It’s very quick to make—just jot down whatever will help you remember.
    • It gives you room to improvise.
    • It’s hard for anyone else to copy.
  • A mnemonic outline has its disadvantages, too:
    • It requires less discipline
    • It has fewer details (and some writers need lots of details)
    • If you forget what your mnemonics mean, you’re in trouble.
  • Use a formal outline if:
    • You need lots of details in order to stay on topic.
    • You’re not quite sure your idea will hold up.
    • You have difficulty remembering mnemonics.
    • You just feel more comfortable with the formal style.
  • Use a mnemonic outline if:
    • You like to improvise a little as you write.
    • You’re certain your concept is a strong one.
    • You’re in a hurry.
    • You’re more comfortable with the mnemonic style.
  • Test your outline on yourself. Imagine writing it. Can you see how it will go?
  • Then test your outline on a friend. Can you explain your essay without boring or confusing your listener?
  • When in doubt, choose the outline that works best for you. That’s all that matters!

Outlining

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:07
  • What is an Outline? 0:43
  • A Sample Essay 1:07
    • Prompt
  • Choosing Your Outline Style 1:55
    • Formal Outline
    • Introduction
    • Using My Brain
    • Advantages
    • Disadvantages
    • Mnemonic Outline
  • A Mnemonic Outline 6:45
    • Essay
    • Introduction
    • Thesis
    • Body Paragraphs
    • Conclusion
  • Choosing Your Outline Style 10:47
    • Advantages
    • Disadvantages
  • Which Outline is Right for You? 12:25
    • Use a Formal Outline If…
    • Use a Mnemonic Outline If…
  • Testing Your Outline 13:55
    • Test on Yourself
    • Test on Someone Else
  • When in Doubt 15:06
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