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Laura Ryan

Laura Ryan

Solfeggio

Slide Duration:

Table of Contents

I. Music Theory
Music Theory

32m 43s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:04
Grand Staff
0:16
Difference Between Single Staff and Grand Staff
0:25
A Brace
0:53
Drawing a Treble Clef
1:05
Remembering the Lines of a Treble Clef
1:45
Remembering the Spaces of a Treble Clef
2:06
Remembering the Lines of a Bass Clef
2:41
Remembering the Spaces of a Bass Clef
2:46
Drawing a Bass Clef
2:59
Major Scales
3:54
Using a Pattern of Intervals to Find a Major Scale in Any Key
3:59
Playing a C Scale
4:56
Playing a Series of Whole and Half Steps
5:14
Counting Intervals on the Keyboard
6:05
Writing a Major Scale
6:37
Writing Below the Staff
6:50
Minor Scales
8:09
Counting Whole and Half Steps of a Minor Scale
8:58
Listening to A Minor
9:08
Finding the Interval Pattern of a Minor Scale
9:55
Writing a Scale in Both Treble and Bass Clefs
10:59
Listening to A Minor
11:10
Names of White Keys
11:25
Matching Keyboard Notes to Notes on the Staff
12:07
Finding Middle C on the Keyboard
12:20
Finding Middle C on the Grand Staff
12:43
Stem Directions
12:53
Names of Black Keys
13:28
Black Keys Can Have Two Different Names
13:38
Sharp = Raise Half Step
13:53
Flat = Lower Half Step
14:06
White Key Half Step Example: E and F
15:08
Finding Black Keys on the Staff
15:53
Writing Sharps and Flats on the Staff
16:02
Writing Sharps and Flats After Letters
17:27
How to Play Chords
17:44
Playing a C Major Chord
18:02
Playing Every Other Key to Form a Chord
18:52
Writing Chords on the Staff
19:00
Chord Progressions
19:24
Chord Progressions are a Series of Chords
19:28
Writing Chord Progressions on the Staff
10:03
Playing Chord Progressions on the Keyboard
21:40
Example 1: Grand Staff
22:07
Example 2: Major Scale on Keyboard
22:52
Example 3: Minor Scale on Keyboard
23:49
Example 4: Naming White and Black Keys
25:14
Example 5: Chords
27:33
Example 6: Exploring Chord Progressions
28:47
II. Properties of the Grand Staff
Staff, Treble Clef & Bass Clef

9m 30s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
The Staff, Five Lines
0:18
The Staff Always Has Five Lines
0:32
Ledger Lines
0:45
Why The Staff Only Has Five Lines
1:00
The Staff, Four Spaces
1:22
Writing Space Notes Between Ledger Lines
1:32
Treble Clef
1:41
The Clef Tells You Which Note is Where
1:47
Writing a Treble Clef
2:00
Using Phrases to Remember the Order of the Lines
2:38
Bass Clef
2:58
Writing a Bass Clef
3:10
Using Phrases to Remember the Order of the Lines
3:54
The Grand Staff
4:57
The Grand Staff is the Treble Clef and Bass Clef Connected by a Brace
5:00
What the Brace Means
5:32
Chords
7:00
Example 1: Treble Clef
7:17
Example 2: Bass Clef
8:16
Example 3: Grand Staff
8:46
Bar Lines & Measures

18m 5s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
Bar Lines
0:22
Where the Bar Line Begins and Ends
0:35
Measures are Used to Think of Music in Smaller Pieces
1:00
Bar Lines Divide A Set Amount of Beats For Each Measure
2:03
Measures
2:24
4/4 Time Signature
2:43
Only 4 Beats in Every Measure When There is a 4/4 Time Signature
2:39
In a Measure, Notes are Spaced Away from the Measure
4:12
Listening to the Example
4:45
Double Bar Lines
5:59
Representing the End and Beginning of Examples
6:20
Listening to the Example
7:07
Repeat Signs
9:03
First and Second Endings
10:34
Listening to the Example
12:55
Example 1: Creating Bar Lines
14:04
Example 2: Creating Double Bar Lines
14:17
Example 3: Creating Bar Lines, Double Bar Lines and Repeat Sign
14:39
Example 4: Creating First and Second Endings
15:24
III. Notes and Rhythms
Rhythmic Notation

18m 44s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
Whole Notes
0:18
Writing Whole Notes
0:24
Whole Notes are 4 Beats
0:30
Listening to a Whole Note
0:56
Octave
1:26
Writing and Identifying Example Whole Notes
1:48
Half Notes
4:17
Half Notes are Connected to a Staff
4:21
Half Notes are 2 Beats
4:24
Writing Half Notes
4:38
Rules for Stem Directions
5:10
Quarter Notes
7:06
Quarter Notes are 1 Beat
1:14
Writing Quarter Notes on the Staff
7:54
Stem Direction
9:16
It's Okay to Have a Down Stem and Up Stem in the Same Measure
10:09
Example 1: Whole Notes
10:56
Example 2: Half Notes
11:26
Example 3: Quarter Notes
11:51
Example 4: Quarter Notes
12:59
Example 5: Stem Direction
13:01
Example 6: Rhythmic Combinations
14:25
Time Signature

18m 49s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
4/4
0:21
What the Top and Bottom Numbers Represent
0:46
4 = Quarter Note
1:15
Review of Whole, Half, and Quarter Notes
1:36
Fill in 4 Counts for Every Measure
1:54
Listening to the Example
3:27
4/4 Continued
5:23
Listening to the Example
6:14
Middle C
6:22
2/4
7:52
2 = Beats/Measure
8:04
Writing 2/4 on the Staff
9:03
2/4 Continued
9:11
Listening to the Example
10:33
Example 1: 4/4
11:26
Example 2: 4/4
13:11
Example 3: 2/4
13:38
Example 4: 2/4
14:32
Rhythmic Notation, Continued

27m 57s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
Dotted Half Notes
0:39
Dots Add Half of the Note's Beat to Itself
1:15
Dotted Half Notes = 3 Quarter Notes = 3 Beats
1:47
Dotted Quarter Notes
2:03
Having Three Beats in a Measure
2:30
3/4 Time Signature = 3 Counts per Measure
2:58
Dotted Quarter Notes
3:34
Eighth Notes Are Half of a Quarter Note
3:44
Dotted Quarter Notes = 1.5 Beats
4:30
Eighth Notes
5:56
Two Eighth Notes in Every Quarter Note
6:01
Listening to the Example
7:18
Dotted Eighth Notes
8:34
1 Eighth Note = 2 Sixteenth Notes
8:42
Eighth Notes Barred and Separate
9:57
Sixteenth Notes
11:00
1 Sixteenth Note = Half of an Eighth Note
11:09
Dotted Sixteenth Notes
12:43
1 Sixteenth Note = 2 Thirty-Second Notes
13:03
Sixteenth Notes Barred and Separate
14:27
Thirty-Second Notes
16:03
Listening to the Example
17:30
Thirty-Second Notes Barred and Separate
18:25
Example 1: Dotted Half Notes
18:51
Example 2: Dotted Quarter Notes
19:55
Example 3: Eighth Note Combinations
21:13
Example 4: Sixteenth Note Combinations
23:16
Example 5: Thirty-Second Note Combinations
24:26
Rests

32m 58s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
Whole Rests
0:47
Writing the Whole Rest
0:59
How Many Counts a Whole Rest is in Different Time Signatures
1:30
Half Rests
1:50
How Many Counts a Half Rest is
1:53
Writing a Half Rest
2:10
Listening to a Whole Rest
2:38
Half Rests are Two Counts of Silence
3:19
Difference Between Writing a Half and Whole Rest
4:19
Quarter Rests
4:45
Quarter Rests are One Count of Silence
4:49
Review of Writing Whole and Half Rests
5:07
Writing a Quarter Rest
5:25
Listening to a Quarter Rest
6:59
Eighth Rests
7:57
Writing an Eighth Rest
8:06
Review of Whole, Half, and Quarter Rests
8:14
Listening to an Eighth Rest
9:33
Two Eighth Rests in a Row
10:09
Sixteenth Rests
10:32
Writing a Sixteenth Rest
10:40
Review of Whole, Half, Quarter, and Eighth Rests
11:27
Listening to a Sixteenth Rest
12:15
Thirty-Second Rests
13:31
Review of Whole, Half, Quarter, Eighth, and Sixteenth Rests
13:49
Written Example with Thirty-Second Rests
14:28
Not Writing the Bar Over a Rest
16:04
Listening to a Thirty-Second Rest
16:29
Explanation of Rest Placement
17:12
Writing the Eighth Rest
17:54
Exploration of Rest Placement Continued
18:41
Writing the Sixteenth Rest
18:42
Writing the Thirty-Second Rest
19:14
Example 1: Whole Rests
19:41
Example 2: Half Rests
20:41
Example 3: Quarter Rests
21:58
Example 4: Eighth Rests
23:10
Example 5: Sixteenth Rests
25:14
Example 6: Thirty-Second Rests
27:27
Example 7: Completing 4/4 Measures with Rests
31:20
Example 8: Completing 2/4 Measures with Rests
31:53
IV. Keyboard Basics
Introduction of Keyboard

19m 11s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:10
Visual Presentation of the Keyboard
0:35
Introduction of Middle C
1:28
Locate C Key
1:50
Middle C Key
2:22
Middle C on This Keyboard
3:22
C in Octaves
3:34
Eight Keys
3:53
Middle C on the Grand Staff Treble Clef
4:35
Middle C on the Grand Staff Bass Clef
5:45
C on Keyboard
6:41
Illustration of Every C on the Piano Keyboard
7:22
C on Keyboard
7:54
Bass Clef
9:22
Listen to More Octaves
10:02
Example 1: Writing Middle C on Treble Clef
11:14
Example 2: Writing Middle C in Bass Clef
12:50
Example 3: Writing Every C on the Keyboard
14:06
Example 4: Finding Middle C on the Keyboard
16:38
Example 5: Every C on a Keyboard
17:47
Finding D E F G A B on the Keyboard

24m 46s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:11
Treble Clef C D E F G A B
0:34
Finding C
0:56
Finding D
1:13
Finding E
1:25
Finding F
1:33
Finding G, A and B
1:52
Bass Clef C D E F G A B
2:30
Playing C, D, E, F, G, A, B
2:46
Finding C
4:16
Finding D, E, F, G, A, B
4:39
White Key Whole Step
5:08
Half Steps
5:44
Whole Steps
5:59
Identifying Half and Whole Steps
6:19
Pattern of Half and Whole Steps
7:38
White Key Half Step
8:07
Sounds of Half Steps
8:30
Treble Clef C D E F G A B
9:21
Writing Treble Clef Notes on the Staff
9:42
Listening to Treble Clef C, D, E, F, G, A, and B
10:30
Drawing Bar Lines
11:12
Bass Clef C D E F G A B
11:30
Listening to Bass Clef C, D, E, F, G, A, and B
12:10
Drawing Bar Lines
12:52
White Key Whole Step and Half Step
13:19
Writing Whole Steps on the Staff
13:38
Writing Half Steps on the Staff
15:03
Example 1: Writing C D E F G A B in Treble Clef
15:59
Example 2: Writing C D E F G A B in Bass Clef
16:48
Example 3: Writing White Key Whole Steps
18:53
Example 4: Writing White Key Half Steps
19:57
Example 5: Finding C D E F G A B on the Keyboard
20:47
Example 6: Finding White Key Whole and Half Steps
21:55
Identifying Black Keys

27m 22s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:14
Sharp Keys C# D# E# F# G# A# B#
0:31
Sharp Something by Raising it by a Half Step
0:45
Listening to Sharps
0:50
Finding Sharps on the Keyboard
1:38
White Keys That Are Also Sharp
2:19
Flat Keys D Flat, E Flat, F Flat, G Flat, A Flat, B Flat, C Flat
2:25
Finding Flats on the Keyboard
2:37
White Keys That Are Also Flat
2:57
Enharmonic Keys: One Note with Two Names
3:05
Whole Steps Using Black Keys
3:20
Two Half Steps = One Whole Step
3:50
Finding Half and Whole Steps on the Keyboard
4:03
Half Step + Half Step = Whole Step
5:27
Half Steps Using Black Keys
5:58
Writing a Sharp or Flat After the Letter
6:12
Listening to the Chromatic Scale
6:50
Chromatic Movement
7:22
Writing Sharps on the Staff
7:32
Middle Box Needs to Intersect the Line or Space That It's Referring To
7:37
The Order of Sharps
8:09
Sharps in the Bass Clef
8:27
In the Staff, The Sharp or Flat Comes Before the Note
8:43
Using Sharps While Ascending, Using Flats While Descending
9:07
Writing Flats on the Staff
9:34
The Order of Flats
9:37
Using Flats While Descending
10:03
Using Sharps While Ascending
10:19
Writing Black Key Whole and Half Steps
10:26
Playing Half Steps on the Keyboard
10:45
Writing Whole Steps on the Staff With Sharps and Flats While Ascending and Descending
11:00
Listening to the Example
12:02
Example 1: Writing Sharp and Flat Notes in Treble Clef
12:58
Example 2: Writing Sharp and Flat Notes in Bass Clef
16:56
Example 3: Writing Black Key Whole Steps
18:08
Example 4: Writing Black Key Half Steps
21:00
Example 5: Finding Sharps on the Keyboard
24:06
Example 6: Finding Flats on the Keyboard
24:47
Example 7: Finding Black Key Whole and Half Steps on the Keyboard
25:18
C Major Scale Whole & Half Steps

19m 19s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:11
C Major Scale on Keyboard
0:24
Pattern of Whole and Half Steps for Major Scales
1:49
C Major Scale on the Staff
4:30
Ascending and Descending Scales
5:18
C Major Whole and Half Steps on the Staff
6:36
Example 1: Writing out C Major Scale in Treble Clef
7:55
Example 2: Writing out C Major Scale in Bass Clef
9:56
Example 3: Illustrating the Whole/Half Step Pattern in C Major
10:50
Example 4: Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern to Find a Major Scale on 'D'
12:37
Writing D Major Scale on Staff
15:06
Example 5: Finding and Playing C Major on Keyboard
15:50
Example 6: Finding and Playing D Major on Keyboard Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern
16:23
Finding and Playing F Major on Keyboard Using the Whole/Half Step Pattern
17:58
V. Intervals
Major, Minor, Perfect & Numbered Intervals

27m 50s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:10
Numbering Notes of C Major Scale on Keyboard
0:22
Scale Degrees of C Major Scale
1:00
Illustration of Major and Minor Intervals of C Major Scale
1:46
Major 2nd (M2)
2:34
Major 3rd (M3)
2:43
M is the Abbreviation for 'Major'
3:04
Perfect 4th (P4)
3:44
P is the Abbreviation for 'Perfect'
3:50
Perfect 5th (P5)
4:03
Major 6th (M6)
4:18
Major 7th (M7)
4:27
Perfect 8th or Perfect Octave (P8)
4:42
Listening to the Major Intervals on the Keyboard
5:15
Minor Intervals of the C Major Scale
6:59
Half Steps are Minor Intervals
7:50
Hearing the Difference Between Major and Minor Intervals
8:47
Illustration of Perfect Intervals in C Major Scale
8:56
Listening to the Perfect Intervals of C Major
9:29
Counting Half Steps of P4
10:05
Counting Half Steps of P5
10:26
Counting Half Steps of P8
10:43
Numbering Intervals of C Major Scale on the Grand Staff
11:01
Identifying Major and Minor Intervals of C Major Scale on Grand Staff
12:04
Finding Major and Minor Intervals on the Grand Staff
12:38
Every Whole Step is M2, Every Half Step is m2
13:48
Identifying Perfect Intervals of C Major Scale on Grand Staff
14:13
Drawing and Playing Intervals as Chords
14:57
Example 1: Finding Major Intervals in C Major Scale
16:32
Example 2: Finding Minor Intervals in C Major Scale
17:07
Example 3: Finding Perfect Intervals in the C Major Scale
17:38
Example 4: Writing Major Intervals of C Major Scale
18:45
Example 5: Writing Minor and Perfect Intervals of C Major Scale
20:07
Example 6: Writing Major, Minor and Perfect Intervals Independent of the C Major Scale
21:26
Counting Half Steps of M3
22:57
Counting Half Steps of P4
23:55
Counting Half Steps of P5
24:43
Counting Half Steps of M6
25:09
Counting Half Steps of M7
26:14
Example 7: Numbering Intervals
26:49
VI. Major and Minor Keys
Circle of Fifths

24m 55s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
C
0:21
Circle of Fifths
0:33
Relative Minor Keys
0:44
Relative Minor Key to C is A Minor
0:56
Listening to the C Scale
1:10
To Find the Relative Minor, Go Down 4 Half Steps
1:20
The Relative Minor Shares the Key Signature of the Major Scale
1:42
C, G
1:58
Relative Minor to G Major is E Minor
2:07
Always Use the Natural Minor for Relative Minors
2:36
Why It's Called the Circle of Fifths
2:59
C, G, D
3:35
Finding the Relative Minor of D Major
4:17
C, G, D, A
4:42
Finding the Relative Minor of A Major
5:03
Relative Minor of A Major is F# Minor
5:10
C, G, D, A, E
5:50
Relative Minor of E Major is C# Minor
6:03
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat
7:19
Relative Minor of B Major / C Flat Major is G# Minor
8:00
Listening to B Major and G# Minor
8:28
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat
9:14
The Relative Minor of F# Major / G Flat Major is D# Minor
10:04
F# Major / G Flat Major and D# Minor Have Six Sharps / Six Flats
10:25
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#
11:55
The Relative Minor of D Flat Major / C # Major is B Flat Minor
12:24
Listening to D Flat/C# Major and B Flat Minor
13:08
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat
14:06
Listening to A Flat Major and F Minor
14:48
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat
15:19
E Flat Major Has Three Flats, And Its Relative Minor is C Minor
15:52
Listening to E Flat Major and C Minor
16:00
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat, B Flat
16:23
B Flat Major Has Two Flats, And Its Relative Minor is G Minor
16:55
Listening to B Flat Major and G Minor
17:10
C, G, D, A, E, B/C Flat, F#/G Flat, D Flat/C#, A Flat, E Flat, B Flat, F
17:25
F Major Has One Flat, And Its Relative Minor is D Minor
18:00
Example 1: Play Circle of Fifths
18:31
Writing the Major Keys of the Circle of Fifths
18:32
Writing the Relative Minor Keys of the Circle of Fifths
20:20
Listening to the Circle of Fifths
22:01
Minor Scales

34m 12s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
Natural Minor
0:42
Natural Minor has Lowered Third, Sixth, and Seventh
1:49
Lowering the Third, Sixth, and Seventh to Find A Minor
2:34
Listening to the Difference Between a Major Scale and a Natural Minor Scale
4:28
Natural Minor Continued
5:14
Listening to the Difference Between a C Major Scale and a C Natural Minor Scale
5:59
Writing C Natural Minor on the Staff
6:28
Harmonic Minor
7:14
Harmonic Minor Has One Difference from Natural Minor
7:19
Review of Natural Minor
7:36
In Harmonic, You Lower the Third and the Sixth, But You Keep the Seventh as it Would Be in a Major Scale
8:01
Listening to the Major, Natural Minor, and Harmonic Minor Scales
9:05
Harmonic Minor Continued
10:26
Writing C Harmonic Minor on the Staff
10:43
Listening to C Harmonic Minor
11:20
Melodic Minor
11:47
Melodic Minor Differs When Ascending and Descending
12:15
Writing Ascending and Descending Melodic Minor on the Staff
13:00
Listening to Melodic Minor
13:30
Melodic Minor Continued
14:13
Writing C Melodic Minor on the Staff
14:18
Listening to C Melodic Minor
15:27
Example 1: Writing Natural Minor
16:04
Example 2: Writing Harmonic Minor
17:54
Example 3: Writing Melodic Minor
19:35
Example 4: Exploring Natural Minor Intervals
24:08
Augmented = An Interval with the Second Note Raised One Half Step
27:07
Diminished = Lowered Half Step
27:42
Example 5: Exploring Harmonic Minor Intervals
27:52
Example 6: Exploring Melodic Minor Intervals
30:19
Key Signatures

32m 43s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:09
Keys of G and D
0:16
Writing and Listening to G Major on the Grand Staff
0:18
Writing and Listening to D Major on the Grand Staff
1:36
Keys of A and E
3:24
Writing A Major on the Staff
3:25
Writing E Major on the Staff
4:14
Listening to A and E Majors
4:44
Keys of B and F#
6:04
Writing B Major on the Staff
6:06
Writing F# Major on the Staff
6:54
Listening to B and F# Majors
7:31
Key of C#
8:47
Writing C# Major on the Staff
9:40
Listening to C# Major
10:11
Keys of F and B Flat
10:34
Writing F Major on the Staff
10:44
Writing B Flat Major on the Staff
11:17
Listening to F and B Flat Majors
11:46
Keys of E Flat and A Flat
12:33
Writing E Flat Major on the Staff
13:00
Writing A Flat Major on the Staff
13:57
Listening to E Flat and A Flat Majors
14:46
Keys of D Flat and G Flat
16:12
Writing D Flat Major on the Staff
16:20
Writing G Flat Major on the Staff
17:04
Listening to D Flat and G Flat Majors
17:48
Key of C Flat
18:58
Writing C Flat Major on the Staff
19:00
Listening to C Flat Major
19:45
Example 1: Order of Sharps
20:30
Phrase for Sharps Backwards: Bead, G, C, F
21:15
Example 2: Order of Flats
21:39
Order of Flats is the Order of Sharps Backwards
21:41
Example 3: Identify Keys of G and D
22:17
Example 4: Identify Keys of A and E
23:55
Example 5: Identify Keys of B, F# and C#
25:48
Example 6: Identify Keys of F, B Flat and E Flat
27:56
Example 7: Identify Keys of A Flat, D Flat and G Flat
29:58
Example 8: Identify Key of C Flat
31:33
The Major Scale in 12 Different Keys

37m 10s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:14
C Major
0:40
C# (D Flat) Major
2:14
C# Major
2:24
D Flat Major
4:12
D Major
6:24
E Flat Major
7:57
Why E Flat Major is not known as D# Major
9:38
E Major
10:26
F Major
11:33
F# (G Flat) Major
12:49
G Major
14:59
A Flat Major
15:38
Why A Flat Major is not known as G# Major
16:11
A Major
18:30
B Flat Major
20:13
B (C Flat) Major
21:15
Example 1: Create a Major Scale on C
25:37
Example 2: Create a Major Scale on D
26:10
Example 3: Create a Major Scale on E
26:37
Example 4: Create a Major Scale on F
28:36
Example 5: Create a Major Scale on G
28:57
Example 6: Create a Major Scale on A
29:32
Example 7: Create a Major Scale on B
30:33
Example 8: Create a Major Scale on C#
31:13
Example 9: Create a Major Scale on E Flat
32:35
Example 10: Create a Major Scale on F#
34:11
Example 11: Create a Major Scale on A Flat
34:48
Example 12: Create a Major Scale on B Flat
35:53
VII. Scale Degrees
Scale Degrees

25m 55s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:08
Tonic
0:25
Supertonic
1:52
Mediant
3:39
Subdominant
5:03
Dominant
6:53
Submediant
9:13
Leading Tone
11:10
Altered Scale Degrees in Natural Minor
13:30
Natural Minor has a Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and FlatLeading Tone (7th)
13:58
Altered Scale Degrees in Harmonic Minor
15:10
Harmonic Minor has a Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and Sharp Leading Tone (7th)
15:29
Altered Scale Degrees in Melodic Minor
16:42
Melodic Minor is Different Ascending and Descending
16:58
Melodic Minor has an Ascending Flat Median (3rd), Sharp Submediant (6th), and Sharp Leading Tone (7th), but a Descending Flat Mediant (3rd), Flat Submediant (6th), and Flat Leading Tone (7th)
17:12
Example 1: Finding the Tonic
18:34
Example 2: Finding the Supertonic
19:18
Example 3: Finding the Mediant
19:55
Example 4: Finding the Subdominant
20:08
Example 5: Finding the Dominant
20:30
Example 6: Finding the Submediant
20:54
Example 7: Finding the Leading Tone
21:16
Example 8: Natural Minor Scale Degrees
21:45
Example 9: Harmonic Minor Scale Degrees
22:26
Example 10: Melodic Minor Scale Degrees
24:07
VIII. Accidentals
Double Sharps & Flats

13m 40s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:12
Review of Sharp
0:19
Double Sharp
1:13
X = Double Sharp
1:35
Double Sharp In a Scale
3:58
Review of Flat
5:59
Double Flat
7:24
Two Flat Signs = Double Flat
7:34
Use of Double Flat In a Scale
8:12
Example 1: Writing Double Sharps
11:02
Example 2: Double Sharp Equivalencies
11:30
Example 3: Writing Double Flats
12:11
Example 4: Double Flat Equivalencies
12:42
IX. Rhythms
3/4, Simple & Compound Meter

15m 46s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:10
Time Signature of 3/4
0:18
Top Number is How Many Beats per Measure, Bottom Number is What Note Makes One Beat
0:28
3/4 Has Three Beats per Measure
1:06
3/4 Continued
1:31
Simple Meter, Duple Simple
2:21
Duple Simple = 2/4
2:32
Simple Meter, Triple Simple
3:01
Triple Simple = 3/4
3:02
Simple Meter, Quadruple Simple
3:38
Quadruple Simple = 4/4
3:39
Compound Meter, Compound Triple
4:02
Compound Triple = 3/8
4:03
3/8 = Three Eighth Notes Per Measure
4:28
Compound Meter, Compound Duple or Simple Triple
5:13
Compound Duple = 6/8
5:20
6/8 = Six Eighth Notes Per Measure
5:32
Simple Triple = 6/8
5:43
Compound Meter, Compound Triple
6:42
Compound Triple = 9/8
6:43
9/8 = Nine Eighth Notes Per Measure
6:46
Compound Meter, Compound Quadruple
7:41
Compound Quadruple = 12/8 = Twelve Eighth Notes Per Measure
7:42
Example 1: 3/4
8:53
3/4 Has Three Beats per Measure
9:02
Example 2: Duple Simple
9:30
Example 3: Triple Simple
9:51
Example 3 Part 2: Quadruple Simple
10:14
Example 4: Compound Triple
10:39
Example 5: Compound Duple or Simple Triple
11:06
Example 6: Compound Triple
13:53
Example 7: Compound Quadruple
14:37
X. Solfeggio
Solfeggio

20m 32s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:10
Movable Do
0:36
Fixed Do
0:50
Movable Do: When You Have the Tonic Note of Every Scale as Do
0:59
Re
2:42
Re is the Supertonic, or Second Scale Degree (2nd)
2:43
Mi
3:47
Mi is the Mediant, or Third Scale Degree (3rd)
3:55
Fa
4:32
Fa is the Subdominant, or Fourth Scale Degree (4th)
5:10
Sol
6:01
Sol is the Dominant, or Fifth Scale Degree (5th)
6:20
La
7:02
La is the Submediant, or Sixth Scale Degree (6th)
7:10
Si (Ti)
8:54
Ti was Introduced in America
9:00
Si (Ti) is the Leading Tone, or Seventh Scale Degree (7th)
9:55
Ear Training Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do
11:03
Example 1: Finding Do
12:30
Example 2: Finding Re
12:42
Example 3: Finding Mi
12:58
Example 4: Finding Fa
13:32
Example 5: Finding Sol
14:34
Example 6: Finding La
15:08
Example 7: Finding Si
16:02
Example 8: Finding Combinations of Solfeggio Patterns
17:10
XI. Triads and Chords
Major Triads

27m 19s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:06
C Major Triad Root
1:00
Three Notes Stacked on Top of One Another = Chord, and All Notes are Played at the Same Time
1:57
C Major Triad Third
2:18
What a Third is
2:21
A Third is Five Half Steps Above the First Note, or the Root
3:06
C Major Triad Fifth
4:27
Finding The Third
6:20
The Third is Always the Middle Note of a Chord
6:37
Finding the Fifth
7:54
Count up 4 Half Steps from the 3rd to Find the Fifth
10:07
Transposing Triads
11:04
Transposing
11:13
Example 1: Triads on Black Keys
13:38
Example 2: Triads on White Keys
18:41
Example 3: Finding the Root
22:36
Example 4: Finding the Third
23:22
Example 5: Finding the Fifth
23:40
Example 6: Playing a Triad on Every Key
25:22
Minor Triads

32m 3s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
C Minor Triad Root
0:35
Finding the Root of the Chord
0:58
Review of Major Triad
1:15
How to Write a Minor Triad
1:28
Writing the C Minor Triad on the Staff
1:57
Major Triads are Labeled with an Uppercase I, But Minor Triads are Labeled with a Lowercase i
2:22
C Minor Triad Third
2:39
Using Half Step Pattern to Find the Third
2:55
Finding the Minor Third Using 4 Half Steps
3:33
C Minor Triad Fifth
4:06
Using Half Step Pattern to Find the Fifth
4:24
Finding the Minor Fifth Using 5 Half Steps
4:38
Half Step Pattern of Major and Minor Chords are Opposite
5:39
Finding the Third
6:13
Converting D Major to D Minor by Lowering the Third
6:37
Using Key Signature to Find Minor Chord
7:37
Writing Out a D Minor Chord
7:54
Finding the Fifth
8:22
Finding the B Flat Minor Chord Using Half Step Pattern
8:54
Playing a B Flat Major and B Flat Minor Scale
10:14
Writing the B Flat Minor Chord on the Staff
11:09
Transposing Minor Triads
11:42
Finding the A Major Chord by Counting Steps
11:56
Writing the Sharps of A Major
12:53
Finding A Major on the Keyboard
13:23
Finding A Minor on the Keyboard by Counting Steps
13:40
Playing A Major Scale on the Keyboard
13:59
Playing A Minor Scale on the Keyboard
14:10
A Minor Doesn't Have Any Accidentals
14:40
Finding D Flat Minor Chord
15:32
The Only Difference Between a Major and Minor Chord is the Third
16:54
Example 1: Finding Minor Triads on Black Keys
17:01
Relative Major and Minor
20:50
Example 2: Finding Minor Triads on White Keys
23:08
Example 3: Finding the Root
26:50
Example 4: Finding the Third
27:13
Example 5: Finding the Fifth
27:27
Example 6: Playing a Minor Triad on Every Key
29:24
Augmented Chords

21m 8s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:10
C Augmented Chord
0:29
The Third of an Augmented Chord is the Same as the Third of a Major Chord
0:55
There are 5 Half Steps Between the Root and Third of an Augmented Chord
1:14
There are 5 Half Steps Between the Third and the Fifth of an Augmented Third
1:31
Writing an Augmented Chord on the Staff
2:33
How to Label an Augmented Chord
2:49
D Augmented Chord
2:57
Counting Half Steps to Find the D Augmented Chord
3:03
Listening to the D Augmented Chord
3:45
E Augmented Chord
4:21
Counting Half Steps to Find the E Augmented Chord
4:31
Writing the E Augmented Chord on the Staff
5:16
F Augmented Chord
6:19
Counting Half Steps to Find the F Augmented Chord
6:26
Listening to the F Augmented Chord
7:28
G Augmented Chord
7:53
Writing the G Augmented Chord on the Staff
8:04
A Augmented Chord
8:30
Counting Half Steps to Find the A Augmented Chord
8:40
Listening to the A Augmented Chord
9:10
B Augmented Chord
9:39
Counting Half Steps to Find the B Augmented Chord
9:50
The B Augmented Chord Has a Double Sharp
10:20
Example 1: Playing C Augmented, Writing C Augmented
11:19
Example 2: Playing D Augmented, Writing D Augmented
12:03
Example 3: Playing E Augmented, Writing E Augmented
13:21
Example 4: Playing F Augmented, Writing F Augmented
14:47
Example 5: Playing G Augmented, Writing G Augmented
16:19
Example 6: Playing A Augmented, Writing A Augmented
16:55
Example 7: Playing B Augmented, Writing B Augmented
17:40
Diminished Chords

19m 5s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
C Diminished Chord
0:28
Diminished Chords are Made Up of Two Minor Thirds
0:40
Counting Half Steps to Find the C Diminished Chord
0:50
Listening to the C Diminished Chord
1:20
Reviewing the C Augmented Chord
1:41
D Diminished Chord
2:34
Counting Half Steps to Find the D Diminished Chord
2:38
Listening to the D Diminished Chord
3:00
E Diminished Chord
4:11
Counting Half Steps to Find the E Diminished Chord
4:18
Writing the E Diminished Chord on the Staff
5:16
F Diminished Chord
5:24
Counting Half Steps to Find the F Diminished Chord
5:30
Listening to the F Diminished Chord
5:50
G Diminished Chord
6:42
Counting Half Steps to Find the G Diminished Chord
6:44
Listening to the G Diminished Chord
7:05
A Diminished Chord
8:29
Counting Half Steps to Find the A Diminished Chord
8:50
Listening to the A Diminished Chord
9:05
Listening to the A Minor Chord
9:13
Listening to the A Major Chord
9:25
Listening to the A Augmented Chord
9:32
B Diminished Chord
10:00
Counting Half Steps to Find the B Diminished Chord
10:09
Listening to the B Diminished Chord
10:27
Listening to the B Augmented Chord
10:35
Listening to the B Major Chord
10:42
Listening to the B Minor Chord
10:45
Example 1: Playing D Flat Diminished, Writing D Flat Diminished
11:42
Example 2: Playing E Flat Diminished, Writing E Flat Diminished
13:05
Example 3: Playing F# Diminished, Writing F# Diminished
14:01
Example 4: Playing A Flat Diminished, Writing A Flat Diminished
14:51
Example 5: Playing B Flat Diminished, Writing B Flat Diminished
16:36
XII. Figured Bass
Roman Numeral Notation in Major & Minor

28m 53s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:09
Major I
0:35
Creating Chords on Every Scale Degree
0:50
Review of Using Half Steps to Write a Major Chord
1:27
Labeling a Major Chord as I
2:08
Major ii
2:20
ii is a Minor Chord
2:34
Major iii
2:48
iii is a Minor Chord
3:04
Major IV
3:10
IV is a Major Chord
3:12
Major V
3:27
V is a Major Chord
3:31
Major vi
3:37
vi is a Minor Chord
3:40
Major vii0
4:10
vii0 is a Diminished Chord
4:14
A Diminished Chord is Two Minor Intervals Stacked on Top of Each Other
4:40
Natural Minor i
6:24
Review of Minor Scale's Lowered Scale Degrees
6:30
Natural Minor ii0
6:59
ii0 is a Diminished Chord
7:27
Natural Minor III
7:38
III is a Major Chord
7:43
Natural Minor iv
8:01
iv is a Minor Chord
8:17
Natural Minor v
8:23
v is a Minor Chord
8:55
Natural Minor VI
9:04
VI is a Major Chord
9:12
Natural Minor VII
9:22
VII is a Major Chord
9:28
Review of Natural Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree
9:36
Harmonic Minor i
10:44
Review of Harmonic Minor Scale
10:52
Harmonic Minor ii0
12:00
Harmonic Minor III+
12:08
III+ is an Augmented Chord
12:19
An Augmented Chord is Made Up of Two Major Intervals
12:31
Harmonic Minor iv
12:54
Harmonic Minor V
13:08
Harmonic Minor VI
13:33
Harmonic Minor vii0
13:50
Review of Harmonic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree
13:56
Listening to the Harmonic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree
14:41
Melodic Minor (Ascending) i
15:24
Review of Melodic Minor Scale
15:33
Melodic Minor (Ascending) ii
16:43
Melodic Minor (Ascending) III+
17:13
Melodic Minor (Ascending) IV
17:37
Melodic Minor (Ascending) V
17:57
Melodic Minor (Ascending) vi0
18:16
Melodic Minor (Ascending) vii0
18:43
Review of Melodic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree (Ascending)
18:48
Listening of Melodic Minor Chords on Every Scale Degree (Ascending)
20:06
Example 1: Major Scale Chord Notation
21:02
Example 2: Natural Minor Scale Chord Notation
22:58
Example 3: Harmonic Minor Chord Notation
24:59
Example 4: Melodic Minor Chord Notation
26:50
XIII. Chords and Inversions
Seventh Chords

16m 52s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:11
A Seventh Chord is a Triad With An Added Third
0:23
Listening to a Seventh Chord
0:35
Writing a Seventh Chord on the Staff
1:05
Major-Major Seventh Chord, Major Triad + Major Seventh
1:18
Listening to a Major-Major Seventh Chord
1:52
Major-Minor Seventh Chord, Major Triad + Minor Seventh
2:29
Notating a Major-Minor Seventh Chord with a 7
2:48
Listening to a Major-Minor Seventh Chord
2:58
Minor-Minor Seventh Chord, Minor Triad + Minor Seventh
3:34
Listening to a Minor-Minor Seventh Chord
3:55
Notating a Minor-Minor Seventh Chord
4:57
Half Diminished Seventh Chord, Diminished Triad + Minor Seventh
5:06
Writing a Half Diminished Seventh Chord
5:24
Listening to a Half Diminished Seventh Chord
5:40
Fully Diminished Seventh Chord, Diminished Triad + Diminished Seventh
7:18
Writing a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord
7:34
Listening to a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord
8:02
Notating a Fully Diminished Seventh Chord
8:44
Example 1: Major-Major Seventh
9:46
Example 2: Major-Minor Seventh
10:50
Example 3: Minor-Minor Seventh
11:54
Example 4: Half-Diminished Seventh
13:07
Example 5: Fully Diminished Seventh
14:42
Chord Inversions

22m 51s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Objectives
0:07
Root Position Triad (5)/(3)
0:15
Root Position G Major
0:33
What the 5 and 3 Represent
1:00
Figured Bass
1:14
Listening to the I Chord
1:55
No Need to Write 5/3
2:15
First Inversion Triad 6/(3)
2:22
Why We Write the 6 but Omit the 3
2:39
What First Inversion Means
3:17
Listening to the I6 Chord
3:25
Second Inversion Triad 6/4
4:21
Fifth Note Becomes the Root
4:29
What the 6 and the 4 Represent
4:42
Listening to the I6/4 Chord
5:30
Root Position Seventh Chord 7
6:47
I7 Represents a Seventh Chord
6:55
Listening to the I7 Chord
7:31
First Inversion Seventh Chord 6/5/(3)
7:45
Moving the Tonic to the Top to Create a First Inversion Seventh Chord
8:03
Explanation of Notation 6/5
8:18
Listening to the I6/5 Chord
9:55
Second Inversion Seventh Chord (6)/4/3
11:14
Moving the Tonic and Submediant to the Top to Create the Second Inversion Seventh Chord
11:25
Explanation of Notation 4/3
11:52
Listening to the I4/3 Chord
13:27
Third Inversion Seventh Chord (6)/4/2
14:08
Moving the Tonic, Submediant, and Dominant to the Top to Create a Third Inversion Seventh Chord
14:20
Listening to the I4/2 Chord
15:05
Example 1: A Major Root Position
15:47
Example 2: A Major First Inversion
16:03
Example 3: A Major Second Inversion
16:25
Example 4: V7
17:48
Example 5: V6/5
18:27
Example 6: V6/4/3
18:59
Example 7: V6/4/2
19:38
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Lecture Comments (1)

0 answers

Post by xin jin on February 27, 2016

Hi,
I feel I can sing the tones correctly when I follow the sequence 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 or the opposite sequence,
but I totally get lost when I sing each tone individually or practice a random combination (Ex: 1 5 6).

I hope one day I will be able to sing a new song by reading the notes. Any suggestion how to practice?

Thanks!

Solfeggio

  • The tones of a scale can be sung using solfeggio.
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 scale degrees of a major scale are also Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si.

Solfeggio

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Objectives 0:10
  • Movable Do 0:36
    • Fixed Do
    • Movable Do: When You Have the Tonic Note of Every Scale as Do
  • Re 2:42
    • Re is the Supertonic, or Second Scale Degree (2nd)
  • Mi 3:47
    • Mi is the Mediant, or Third Scale Degree (3rd)
  • Fa 4:32
    • Fa is the Subdominant, or Fourth Scale Degree (4th)
  • Sol 6:01
    • Sol is the Dominant, or Fifth Scale Degree (5th)
  • La 7:02
    • La is the Submediant, or Sixth Scale Degree (6th)
  • Si (Ti) 8:54
    • Ti was Introduced in America
    • Si (Ti) is the Leading Tone, or Seventh Scale Degree (7th)
  • Ear Training Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si Do 11:03
  • Example 1: Finding Do 12:30
  • Example 2: Finding Re 12:42
  • Example 3: Finding Mi 12:58
  • Example 4: Finding Fa 13:32
  • Example 5: Finding Sol 14:34
  • Example 6: Finding La 15:08
  • Example 7: Finding Si 16:02
  • Example 8: Finding Combinations of Solfeggio Patterns 17:10