Rebekah Hendershot

Rebekah Hendershot

Basic Rhetorical Modes

Slide Duration:

Table of Contents

Section 1: Introduction
Introduction

13m 8s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:11
Why Does This Test Exist?
0:29
What is Rhetoric?
0:47
Definition
0:48
If You Can't Express Your Thoughts Clearly and Logically, You're Not Thinking Clearly
0:59
Why Does Rhetoric Matter?
3:21
Writing Papers
3:33
Participating in Debates
3:49
Discussing Ideas in Class
4:01
Arguing with Your Friends
4:13
So Why Take a Test on Rhetoric
4:28
Show You Know Your Way Around an Argument
4:36
What's on The Test?
5:27
Section 1: Multiple Choice
5:33
Section 2: Free Response
6:01
How is the Test Scored?
7:55
How This Course Will Work
10:14
Introduction
10:24
Multiple Choice
10:29
Essay Basics
10:50
Rhetoric Crash Course
11:20
The Rhetorical Analysis Essay
12:11
The Argumentative Essay
12:21
The Synthesis Essay
12:30
Final Thoughts
12:41
Section 2: Multiple-Choice section
Multiple Choice Overview

7m 34s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Question Structure
0:41
Multiple Choice Section
0:43
Answer Questions About These
1:33
Selection Sources
2:12
Works Written in 19th and 20th Centuries
2:15
Selections Were Written in English or Translated
2:51
It's All About Variety!
3:16
Basic Test-Taking Strategies
3:52
Read the Passage First
3:56
Read for the Big Picture
4:41
Do Everything Twice
5:01
Use the Process of Elimination
6:09
How to Read & Interpret a Passage

10m 18s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Read for the Big Picture
0:30
Concentrate on the Following
0:42
Big-Picture Questions Often Come at the Beginning and End Set of Questions
1:09
What to Look For
1:25
The Author's Goal
1:29
The Author's Tone
2:22
The Author's Point of View
4:13
Hunting for Details
5:11
Read Questions and Hunt for Details
5:21
Detail Questions that Reference Specific Lines
5:37
Detail Questions Depend on Context
6:02
Detail Questions Often Depend on Vocabulary
6:27
Clues to the Big Picture
7:11
Final Tips
7:54
When Answering Detail Questions, Read for Content and Context
8:05
Pace Yourself
8:17
Skip & Go Back to Questions
8:41
Multiple Choice Practice

13m 33s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Source Passage
0:25
Read the Passage
0:59
The Questions
1:23
Big-Picture Questions
1:50
Question 3
1:51
Question 8
3:10
Question 10
4:18
Detail Questions
5:32
Question 1
5:35
Question 2
6:52
Question 4
7:55
Question 5
8:41
Question 6
10:06
Question 7
10:59
Question 9
11:47
Final Tips
12:45
Section 3: Essay Basics
AP Essay Section

9m 2s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Format of the Essay Section
0:33
120 Minutes to Answer Three Essay Questions
0:36
15-Minute Reading Period
0:49
55 Percent of Your Grade
1:14
Bring Pens
1:34
Content of the Essay Section
1:49
Rhetorical Analysis/ Expository
1:53
Argumentative Essay
2:07
Synthesis Essay
2:32
Who's Reading These Essays?
2:57
High-School, College and University Instructors
3:06
They're Unfamiliar with Your Style of Writing
3:27
Cannot Tailor Your Essay to Their Personal Preferences
3:45
Most Essays are Read at Least Twice for Consistency
4:49
Readers Give About 65% of the Essays They Read a Middling Score
4:59
Relieve the Monotony and Make Your Essay Stand Out!
5:20
Why Do These Essays Matter?
5:29
55% of Your Grade
5:34
Display Your Unique talents and Think Outside the Box
5:58
Essays Intimidate Many Students
6:12
How Are These Essays Different?
6:54
No Chance to Revise
7:00
Can't Study Subject Matter in Advance
7:39
Form and Writing Style Matter as Much as Content
7:59
Writing Audience
8:21
AP Essay Section Scoring

10m 58s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Holistic Scoring
0:43
Essays Will Not Be Graded According to a Checklist
0:51
Score Reflects the Overall Quality of Your Essay
0:58
ETS Table Leaders Choose Real Essays from Each Year's Crop to Represent Typical Essays of Each Level
1:18
A Reader Will End Up Re-Reading and Re-Correcting Certain Essays at Random
2:06
What the Reader Wants
2:38
Easy to Score Essay
2:44
Interesting Essay
3:19
Scoring Guide
4:05
Scores 8-9
4:10
Scores 6-7
5:15
Scores 5
5:58
Scores 3-4
7:06
Scores 1-2
7:54
Scores 0 and -
8:25
The Two Secrets of Essay Scores
8:49
Clarity is Everything
8:59
It's All About Level 5
9:37
Strategies to Raise Your Essay Score

9m 28s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Formatting Tips
0:36
Neatness Counts
0:39
Indent Your Paragraphs
2:23
Writing Tips
3:39
Write Perfectly
3:42
Write with Flair
4:55
Content Tips
5:59
Answer the Question
6:04
Take a Few Risks
6:31
Test-Taking Strategies
7:06
Budget Your Time
7:11
Order Your Essays
8:18
Section 4: Rhetoric
Rhetoric Crash Course: Claims

14m 18s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:11
The Three Elements of Argument
0:34
Claim
1:02
Support
1:09
Warrant
1:14
An Example
1:27
What is a Claim?
3:12
Define Claim/ Proposition
3:15
Conclusion of Argument
3:25
Thesis Statement
3:41
Types of Claims
3:51
Claims of Fact
3:55
Claims of Value
4:18
Claims of Policy
4:48
Claims of Fact
5:19
Defining Characteristic
5:21
To Evaluate a Claim of Fact
6:39
Claims of Value
8:33
Defining Characteristic
8:35
To Evaluate a Claim of Value
9:17
Claims of Policy
11:19
Defining Characteristic
11:21
To Evaluate a Claim of Policy
11:50
Rhetoric Crash Course: Support

14m 26s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
The Three Elements of Argument
0:34
Claim
0:56
Support
1:03
Warrant
1:09
An Example
1:17
What is Support?
2:01
Information Provided to Back Up a Claim
2:03
Usually Shows Up in the Body Paragraphs
2:10
Types of Support
2:21
Evidence
2:23
Appeals to Needs and Values
2:53
Factual Evidence
3:26
Opinions
4:52
Four Forms
5:03
Evaluation of Evidence
5:43
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Factual Evidence
5:46
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Statistics
7:21
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Opinions
8:23
Appeals to Needs
9:35
Physiological Needs
10:01
Safety Needs
10:13
Love Needs
10:26
Esteem Needs
10:45
Self-Actualization Needs
11:04
Appeals to Values
11:27
Needs Give Rise to Values
11:30
Different Groups Will Interpret Values Differently
11:54
Knowing Your Audience's Values Will Help
12:41
Evaluation of Appeals to Needs and Values
12:52
Have the Values Been Clearly Defined?
12:57
Are They Prominent in the Audience's Hierarchy?
13:14
Is It Clearly Related to the Needs and Values Being Addressed?
13:51
Rhetoric Crash Course: Warrants

10m 29s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:11
The Three Elements of Argument
0:38
Claim
0:52
Support
1:00
Warrant
1:09
An Example
1:17
What is a Warrant?
1:53
Definition
2:01
May Not Be Stated At All in Your Essay
2:28
Types of Warrants
3:14
Authoritative Warrants
3:19
Substantive Warrants
4:03
Motivational Warrants
5:10
Evaluation of Warrants
5:32
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Authoritative Warrants
5:44
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Substantive Warrants
6:43
Ask These Questions to Evaluate Motivational Warrants
9:07
Rhetoric Crash Course: Logical Fallacies

19m 17s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What is a Fallacy?
0:24
Inductive Fallacies
0:44
Deductive Fallacies
0:57
Hasty Generalization
1:42
Example
2:02
Faulty Use of Authority
2:32
Example
3:16
Post Hoc
3:45
Example
4:11
False Analogy
5:08
Example
5:32
Ad Hominem
6:18
Example
6:56
False Dilemma / Black-White
7:25
Example
7:39
Slippery Slope
8:25
Example
9:01
Begging the Question
9:38
Example
9:57
Straw Man
10:40
Example
11:09
Two Wrongs Make a Right
12:32
Example
12:48
Non Sequitur
13:29
Example
13:58
Ad Populum
14:45
Example
15:19
Appeal to Tradition
15:52
Example
16:19
Faulty Emotional Appeals
17:02
Example
18:05
Basic Rhetorical Modes

11m 18s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
What is a Rhetorical Mode?
0:27
Ready-Made Approaches to Writing Essays
0:33
Some Multiple-Choice Questions Will Use Terminology Associated with Rhetorical Modes
0:49
Example / Illustration
1:03
Use Examples That Your Reader Will Understand
1:35
Draw Examples From Real Life
1:59
Introduce Your Examples Using Transitions
2:49
Examples to Illustrate Your Point
3:03
Discard Examples That May Disprove Your Point
3:42
Classification
4:20
Writer Organizes People, Places, Things, or Ideas into Categories
4:25
Classification Works Best When You Are Asked to Analyze or Explain Something
4:49
Sort Your Info Into Meaningful Groups
5:14
Make Sure the Categories Do Not Overlap
5:54
Comparison and Contrast
6:49
Organize Your Essay Around the Qualities Being Discussed
7:31
Do Your Best to Combine Elements into a Limited Number of Groups
8:24
Analogy
8:57
Russell's Teapot Example
9:19
Expository Writing (Explanation)
10:05
Complex Rhetorical Modes

14m 22s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What is a Rhetorical Mode?
0:31
Process Analysis
0:56
Describe in Chronological Order
1:21
Use Appropriate Terminology
1:42
Cause and Effect
2:18
This Mode Is All About Underlying Causes
2:32
Don’t Confuse a Connection in Time or Space with True Cause and Effect
3:05
Definition
3:48
Keep Your Reason for Defining Something in Mind as You're Writing
5:06
Define Key Terms According to What You Know of Your Audience
5:19
Description
6:10
Use All Five Senses
7:21
Place the Most Striking Examples at the Beginnings and Ends of Your Paragraphs
7:41
Focus on Distinctive Mannerisms When Describing People
8:45
Narration
9:47
Structure Events in Chronological Order
10:35
Provide a Realistic Setting
10:54
Induction and Deduction
12:00
Induction
12:08
Deduction
12:32
When Using Inductive Reasoning, Proceed from the Specific to the General
13:01
When Using Deductive Reasoning, Proceed from the General to the Specific
13:34
Section 5: Rhetorical Analysis Essay
The Rhetorical Analysis Essay

6m 17s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What is a Rhetorical Analysis Essay?
0:38
Definition
0:41
Prompt
0:54
What a Rhetorical Analysis Essay Isn't
1:09
Not a Chance for You to Show Off Your Own Rhetorical Skills
1:14
Not an Opportunity to Refute the Text
1:28
Read the Prompt Carefully (Twice)
2:07
First Time
2:11
Second Time
2:33
Looks for the Elements of Argument
3:05
Claim, Warrant, Support
3:11
Claim is Important
3:29
Look for Point of View
4:03
Look for Rhetorical Strategies
4:50
The Rhetorical Analysis Prompt

7m 31s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What is a Rhetorical Analysis Essay
0:27
Definition
0:31
Prompt
0:44
Read the Prompt - Twice
0:56
First Time
1:00
Second Time
1:14
Reading the Text
1:31
Skimming is Fine
1:44
What to Look For
2:01
Elements of Argument
2:03
Unusual Language
2:31
Why Were the Examples Chosen
2:44
Keep In Mind the Purpose
3:05
Look for the Rhetorical Modes
3:20
How to Answer
4:07
Outline
4:11
Answer the Question You're Being Asked!
4:34
Begin with a Brief Hook
5:03
Provide a 'Road Map'
5:29
Line Up Your Support with Your Strongest Material
6:10
Rhetorical Analysis Practice

12m 8s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:08
Where to Find the Prompt
0:52
Analyzing the Prompt
1:19
It Offers Background Info
1:22
It Gives the Context of the Speech
1:52
It has a Focus
2:15
Reading the Text
2:36
How She Begins
2:46
Uses a Series of Examples
2:57
Appeals to Sentiment
3:15
Use of Description and Narration
3:41
Analogy
3:50
As the Piece Moves On…
3:56
Proposes Her Solution
4:20
Appeal to Patriotism
4:46
Scoring Guidelines
5:04
Score of 9
5:10
Score of 8
5:30
Score of 7
5:54
Score of 6
6:04
The Sample Essays
6:14
Sample 2A, Score of 8
6:23
Rule of Three
6:35
Sample is Notable for its Language
6:56
Sample 2B, Score of 6
7:51
Imprecision
8:30
Sample 2C, Score of 1
9:12
Tips for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay
10:44
Look for the Elements of Argument
10:52
Language!
11:04
Outline
11:23
Don't Over-Quote
11:45
Section 6: Argumentative Essay
The Argumentative Essay

10m 22s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
What is an Argumentative Essay?
0:33
Definition
0:35
Refute, Support or Qualify
0:52
The Good News
1:20
Express Yourself!
1:28
There's No Correct Answer
1:58
The Essay is Easily Identified
2:16
Read the Prompt Carefully (Twice)
2:29
First Time: Underline the Directions Given
2:34
Second Time: Look for Anything You Might Have Missed
3:20
Find the Main Idea
3:43
Three Elements
3:48
Claim
3:53
Take a Clear Stand
4:55
Good to Refute the Claim You Can Reasonably Do So
5:33
Construct Your Argument
6:41
What Warrant Connects Your Support to Your Claim?
6:58
Have You Organized Your Essay to best Reflect the Strength of Your Argument?
7:42
Remember the Little Things!
8:01
Write in the Present Tense
8:03
Everything the Author Says or Does is Always Described in the Present Tense
8:27
Use the Past Tense for Historical Facts
9:02
Watch Your Spelling, Grammar, and Punctuation
9:11
Make Sure Your First Paragraph is Neat
9:24
Take a Few Risks with Your Language
9:53
The Argumentative Prompt

8m 19s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What is an Argumentative Essay?
0:35
Definition
0:39
Refute, Support or Qualify
0:51
Read the Prompt - Twice
1:08
First Time: Underline the Directions Given
1:15
Second Time: Look for Anything You Might Have Missed
2:05
Reading the Text
2:17
What to Look For
2:45
Elements of Argument
2:47
Hooks
3:05
Obvious Flaws
3:28
Choosing Your Side
3:42
Which Side Do You Feel Most Strongly About?
4:01
Do You Have Two or Three Strong Examples?
4:55
How to Answer
5:54
Answer the Question You're Being Asked
6:09
Use Multiple Types of Examples
6:28
Begin with a Brief Hook
6:47
Provide a Road Map
7:00
Write in Present Tense and Use the First-Person Singular
7:57
Argumentative Practice

13m 1s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Where to Find the Prompt
0:48
Question #3
1:04
Analyzing the Prompt
1:17
Background Information
1:24
Focus
1:51
Demand
2:02
Reading the Text
2:18
He Explains Why it Should Not Exist
2:38
He Claims That Because American Society is Founded on the Principles of the Rights of Man
2:52
Specific Examples
3:12
Define Concord
3:39
What's the Big Idea?
4:25
Paine's Main Idea
4:31
Scoring Guidelines
4:54
Score of 9
5:02
Score of 8, 7 or 6
5:31
The Sample Essays
6:02
Sample 3a; Score of 9
6:06
Sophistication of Style
6:28
Use of Analogies
7:36
Command of Language
8:04
Sample 3b; Score of 5
8:27
Sample 3c; Score of 1
10:23
Tips for the Argumentative Essay
11:57
Language!
12:02
Underlying Structure
12:15
Blend Your Evidence With Your Opinion
12:27
Section 7: Synthesis Essay
The Synthesis Essay

9m 19s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:08
What is a Synthesis Essay?
0:35
Involves Multiple Sources
0:53
Why Do I Have to Write One?
1:08
Need to Read and Evaluate Multiple Sources in College
1:44
Prove You Know How to Write a Good Research Paper
2:00
It's About Your Skills
2:12
Read the Prompt Carefully (Twice)
2:31
The First Time
3:14
The Second Time
2:36
Read the Texts - Sort Of
3:46
15-Minute Reading Period
3:50
Get Familiar with Details
4:29
Skimming is Okay
4:44
Find the Main Idea(s)
5:00
Text as Image
5:19
Common Symbols
5:35
Assume You'll Have to Interpret What You Read
5:53
Choose Your Sources
6:06
Don't Try to Use All the Sources
6:27
Not All Sources Will Be Relevant
6:59
Remember the Little Things!
7:26
Write in the Present Tense
7:34
Everything the Author Says or Does is Always Described in the Present Tense
8:06
Use the Past Tense for Historical Facts
8:32
Watch Your Spelling, Grammar, and Punctuation
8:43
Make Sure Your First Paragraph is Neat
8:49
Take a Few Risks with Your Language
8:56
The Synthesis Prompt

8m 30s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
What is a Synthesis Essay?
0:34
Involves Multiple Sources
0:51
Reading the Prompt - Twice
1:07
The First Time
1:12
The Second Time
1:43
How to Speed-Read Texts
2:10
Skim
2:22
Pay Attention to Language
2:37
Cross Out Texts You Don't Need
2:58
Interpreting Images
3:07
One Source Will be Visual
3:12
Look at Composition
3:29
Identifiable Symbols
4:32
Resemblance to Earlier Images?
4:54
Context of This Image
5:09
Follow Your Instincts
5:46
Use Sources That Connect to That Reaction
6:01
Check With Prompt
6:06
How to Answer
6:33
Outline
6:46
Include Your Analysis on What All the Sources' Opinions Mean
7:01
Report and Analyze, Not Opine.
7:40
Synthesis Practice

10m 23s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Where to Find the Prompt
0:36
Analyzing the Prompt
0:57
Defines a Term
1:00
Hypothetical Situation
1:07
Demands
1:14
Reading the Texts
1:43
Source A
1:46
Source B
1:59
Source C
2:24
Source D
2:39
Source E
2:47
Source F
2:57
Source G
3:13
Some Possible Approaches
3:34
Variety of Arguments for Locavorism
4:03
You Must Use at Least Three Sources
4:15
Scoring Guidelines
4:34
Score of 9
4:42
Score of 8, 7 or 6
5:03
The Sample Essays
5:23
Sample 1A; Score of 8
5:28
Sample 1B; Score of 5
6:31
Sample 1C; Score of 3
7:46
Tips for the Synthesis Essay
8:59
Language Still Matters
9:04
Read the Prompt Carefully
9:12
Use a Lot of Sources
9:35
Don't Use Long Quotations or Summaries
9:40
No Right or Wrong Answer
10:00
Section 8: Test Walkthrough
Multiple Choice Walkthrough, Part 1

24m 26s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Where to Find the Questions
0:30
Reading the Passages
1:24
Passage 2
1:51
Big-Picture Questions
2:32
Question 11
2:33
Question 18
3:25
Question 21
4:31
Question 22
5:27
Detail Questions
6:34
Question 12
6:39
Question 13
7:34
Question 14
8:31
Question 15
9:16
Question 16
10:18
Question 17
11:08
Question 19
12:06
Question 20
12:57
Passage 3
13:46
Big-Picture Questions
14:07
Question 23
14:10
Question 33
15:07
Detail Questions
16:08
Question 24
16:11
Question 25
17:08
Question 26
17:48
Question 27
18:23
Question 28
19:36
Question 29
20:37
Question 30
21:49
Question 31
22:39
Question 32
23:16
Multiple Choice Walkthrough, Part 2

19m 6s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Where to Find the Questions
0:25
Reading the Passages
1:07
Passage 4
1:31
Big Picture Questions
1:58
Question 34
2:01
Question 39
3:00
Question 42
3:36
Detail Questions
4:13
Question 35
4:14
Question 36
5:26
Question 37
6:06
Question 38
6:53
Question 40
7:40
Question 41
8:16
Question 43
9:07
Passage 5
9:52
Big Picture Questions
10:09
Question 44
10:11
Question 54
11:03
Question 55
11:43
Detail Questions
12:39
Question 45
12:40
Question 46
13:10
Question 47
13:50
Question 48
14:16
Question 49
15:47
Question 50
16:33
Question 51
17:23
Question 52
17:51
Question 53
18:25
Rhetorical Analysis Walkthrough

12m 11s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
Where to Find the Prompt
0:33
Question 2
0:49
Analyzing the Prompt
0:58
Background Info
1:00
Context
1:21
Focus
1:43
Reading the Text
2:05
Begins with Example
2:13
Quotation
2:37
Analogy
2:56
Appeal to Authority
3:11
Appeal to Values
3:54
Scoring Guidelines
4:07
Score of 8 or 9
4:15
Score of 6 or 7
4:39
Score of 5
4:53
Score of 4 or Below
5:16
Scoring Guidelines
5:34
Top Scoring Essays Identified the Main Point First
5:36
Essays That Had Problems Included Those That Stumbled Over Banneker's Old-Fashioned Language
6:08
The Sample Essays
6:27
Sample 2A; Score of 8
6:33
Sample 2B; Score of 5
7:37
Score 2C; Score of 2
8:47
Tips for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay
10:28
Look for the Elements of Argument
10:34
Outline
10:53
Language, Language, Language!
11:08
Don't Over-Quote!
11:46
Argumentative Walkthrough

11m 29s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:09
Where to Find the Prompt
0:46
Question 3
1:04
Analyzing the Prompt
1:18
Background Info
1:20
Focus
1:56
Demand
2:18
Reading the Text
2:26
Text Summarizes the Argument Rather Than Quoting It
2:31
This Prompt Suggests Lines of Thought for You
2:49
This Prompt is About Humorists
3:07
What's The Big Idea?
4:14
Main Idea
4:29
Scoring Guidelines
5:03
Score of 9
5:09
Score of 8, 7, and 6
5:29
The Sample Essays
6:05
Sample 3A; Score of 8
6:09
Begins Support with Examples From History and High Culture
6:24
Reviewer Praises the Language, Structure, and Organization
6:51
Sample 3B; Score of 7
7:58
Sample 3C; Score of 3
8:56
Tips for the Argumentative Essay
10:24
Language
10:28
Make Sure the Underlying Structure of Your Argument is Sound
10:40
Use Examples from High Culture as Well as Low
11:00
Don't Make Assertions without Presenting Evidence
11:17
Synthesis Walkthrough

11m 33s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:08
Where to Find the Prompt
0:34
Question 1
0:44
Analyzing the Prompt
0:56
Background Information
1:00
Hypothetical Situation
1:07
Demands
1:13
Reading the Texts
1:55
Source A
1:59
Source B
2:24
Source C
2:41
Source D
2:56
Source E
3:23
Source F
4:01
Some Possible Approaches
4:19
Variety of Arguments
4:25
Source with a Negative View of Technology in the Classroom
4:45
Can Choose Which Source to Address
4:58
Scoring Guidelines
5:41
Score of 9
5:46
Score of 8, 7, and 6
6:06
The Sample Essays
6:23
Sample 1A; Score of 8
6:32
Sample 1B; Score of 6
7:39
Sample 1C; Score of 3
8:30
Tips for the Synthesis Essay
9:50
Read the Prompt Carefully
10:00
Using a Lot of Sources is Better Than Using Only a Few
10:31
Don’t Use Fillers
10:49
There is No Right or Wrong Answer
11:16
Section 9: Final Thoughts
Tips for the Test

16m 26s

Intro
0:00
Lesson Overview
0:10
What Will the Test Be Like?
0:42
Location
1:02
Environment
1:15
Cheating
1:40
Format
2:05
What to Bring
2:17
What Not to Bring
4:00
Exceptions
6:14
Preparing for the Multiple-Choice Section
6:29
Read!
6:42
Read What You're Assigned in School
7:01
Read Things That Challenge You
7:20
Take Practice Tests
7:38
Preparing for the Rhetorical Analysis Essay
8:05
Read Arguments
8:10
Classic Arguments
8:25
Contemporary Arguments
8:55
Pick Out Elements of Argument and Identify Logical Fallacies
9:18
Practice Writing Under Test Conditions
9:26
Preparing for the Argumentative Essay
9:43
Pick a Few Contemporary Issues and Practice Writing Arguments on All Sides
9:46
Use a Quotation to Find Clear Statements of Opinion
10:08
Practice Writing Under Test Conditions
10:44
Preparing for the Synthesis Essay
10:50
Pick a Few Current Issues and read a Variety of Sources
11:04
Practice
11:20
Last Minute Strategies
11:27
Scout the Location
11:35
Pack Your Test Kit the Night Before
11:53
Read Something You Enjoy the Night Before
12:04
No Sugar or Caffeine Highs
12:55
Relax
13:16
Remember That Any Individual Question Isn't Worth Much on the Test
13:50
Don't Focus About Consequences During the Test
14:10
Set Yourself a Reward for Finishing the Exam
14:45
And Remember…
15:32
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