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For more information, please see full course syllabus of AP US Government
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Lecture Comments (9)

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Fri Sep 2, 2016 12:57 AM

Post by Jeanette Morris on August 18 at 09:00:12 PM

FYI somewhere around 8:40 you say Madison wrote most of the Federalist essays, but actually it is generally agreed that he wrote somewhere close to 29, Jay wrote 5, and Hamilton wrote the most, somewhere around 51.

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Thu Dec 4, 2014 12:39 AM

Post by Rebecca Dai on December 3, 2014

Could you suggest a book for this course please? Thanks

3 answers

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Thu Dec 4, 2014 12:39 AM

Post by Rebecca Dai on December 3, 2014

In order to amend articles, what does 13/13 refer to? The senate?

0 answers

Post by Polina Korneeva on June 12, 2014

Dear Mr Park,

In the section of a video where you talk about Popular Sovereignty you say that statement 'The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens of the several states' is in Article I, Section 9 - but  this is actually Article IV. I am confused.
Article 1 Section 9 mostly talks about tax as far as I know.

The Constitution

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  1. Intro
    • Lesson Overview
      • Limited Government
      • Popular Sovereignty
      • Separation of Powers
      • Checks and Balances - Congress on President
      • Checks and Balances - Congress on Judiciary
      • Checks and Balances - President and Judiciary
      • Federalism
      • Formal Amendment Process
      • Informal Amendment Process
      • Election of 1800
      • Marbury v. Madison (1803)
      • Example 1
        • Example 2
          • Example 3
            • Intro 0:00
            • Lesson Overview 0:21
            • Limited Government 1:48
              • Belief That Government is Not All-Powerful
              • Enumerated Powers Given to the Federal Government
              • Bill of Rights Added to Ensure That National Government
            • Popular Sovereignty 3:37
              • Doctrine Rooted in the Belief That Every Human Being is Sovereign
              • Not a Coincidence That the Legislative Branch is the First Branch of the Government
              • Declaration of Independence
              • 'We, the People' in the Preamble Included Everyone
              • No Mention of Women in the Constitution
              • Citizens of Each State
              • What Was Permitted Was Not Necessarily Promoted
              • Wyoming Extended the Vote to Women
            • Separation of Powers 7:19
              • Three Branches: Legislative, Executive, Judiciary
              • If Men Were Angels Government Would Not Be Necessary
              • Influence of Adam Smith and The Wealth of Nations
              • Founding Fathers Did Not Want Power Vested in One Person or Group of People
              • Each Branch Has Exerted More Influence Over Different Periods of Time
            • Checks and Balances - Congress on President 10:29
              • Each Branch Can Check the Powers of the Others
              • Congress Can Override a President's Veto
              • Congress Can Impeach the President
              • Congress Can Refuse to Approve Presidential Appointment
              • Congress Can Refuse to Ratify Treaties
              • Congress Can Mount an Investigation
            • Checks and Balances - Congress on Judiciary 15:16
              • Congress Can Change the Number and Jurisdiction of the Lower Court
              • Congress Can Use the Impeachment Powers to Remove a Judge From Office
              • Congress Can Refuse to Approve a Person Nominated to be a Judge
            • Checks and Balances - President and Judiciary 16:31
              • President Provides These Checks
              • Judiciary Has These Checks on Other Branches
            • Federalism 20:56
              • Government Authority Shared by National and State Governments
              • Concept of 'Dual Federalism'
              • United States v. Lopez 1995
            • Formal Amendment Process 26:19
              • 2/3 Vote Through Congress and Ratified by 3/4 of State Legislatures
              • 2/3 Vote Through Congress and Ratified by Special Conventions in 3/4 of the States
              • National Convention 2/3 Vote and Ratified by 3/4 of State Legislatures
              • National Convention 2/3 Vote and Ratified by 3/4 of States
            • Informal Amendment Process 30:18
              • Legislative Actions
              • Executive Actions
              • Judicial Interpretation
              • Custom and Usage
            • Election of 1800 33:04
              • Political Parties
              • Aaron Burr and Thomas Jefferson
              • 12th Amendment Added
            • Marbury v. Madison (1803) 35:22
              • Adams and his Congress Created Several New Judicial Positions
              • 'Midnight Appointments' Were Set for the Secretary of State to Deliver
              • Marshall Ruled the Portion of the Judiciary Act of 1791 as Unconstitutional
              • Marshall Established Judicial Review
            • Example 1 38:20
            • Example 2 40:18
            • Example 3 42:31