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Lecture Comments (7)

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Sat Jan 10, 2015 11:23 AM

Post by Rebecca Dai on January 9, 2015

In example 2, how come the terms of congress last for two years? Shouldn't the terms of upper house last for 6 years?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Sat Jan 10, 2015 11:23 AM

Post by Rebecca Dai on January 9, 2015

What do you mean when you say republicans take over the house? Does it mean that there are more republicans in house than democrats?

1 answer

Last reply by: Professor Jibin Park
Sat Jan 10, 2015 11:23 AM

Post by Rebecca Dai on January 9, 2015

Also, when we memorize all the presidents, do we need to memorize their vice presidents as well? Do we need to know what each president did? Thanks

0 answers

Post by Rebecca Dai on January 9, 2015

During every election, I guess there is not only 1 incumbent that needs to run the election again to get elected. Then why are two people competing? Shouldn't all the incumbent that need to run the election compete with all the challengers? I don't really understand this. Thanks

Legislative Branch

Lecture Slides are screen-captured images of important points in the lecture. Students can download and print out these lecture slide images to do practice problems as well as take notes while watching the lecture.

  • Intro 0:00
  • Lesson Overview 0:14
  • Bicameral Legislature 1:33
    • House of Representatives
    • Senate
  • Organization of Congress 13:07
    • Two Houses Meet for Two Years
    • President May Call Special Sessions in Case of National Emergency
    • Apportionment
    • Reapportionment
    • Gerrymandering
  • Incumbency Effect 17:59
    • Tendency of Those Already Holding Office to Win Reelection
    • Name Recognition
    • Casework for Constituents
    • Franking Privilege
  • Other Incumbency Advantages 24:02
    • More Visible to Constituents
    • Fund-Raising Abilities
    • Experience in Campaigning
    • Voting Record
  • 2012 House Election: Ed Royce vs. Jay Chen 27:10
    • Ed Royce Defeated Challenger Jay Chen
    • Republican Registration Advantage and Incumbency
  • House of Representatives Leadership 37:21
    • Speaker of the House is the Presiding Officer
    • Majority and Minority Leaders
    • Whips Helps Floor Leader by Directing Party Members in Voting
  • Senate Leadership 42:01
    • Vice President is the Presiding Officer of the Senate
    • President Pro Tempore
    • Senate Majority Leader and Minority Leader Act as a Spokesperson
    • Whips
    • No House Equivalent of Speaker As Individual Senators
  • Example 1 46:13
  • Example 2 47:09
  • Example 3 48:11
  • Example 4 51:01
  • Example 5 53:42