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Ace the AP United States Government test with Professor Jibin Park who makes history come alive while giving you the tools to get a 5 on the exam.

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I. US Constitution

  Foundations of the American Republic 46:32
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:11 
   Preamble of the United States Constitution 1:38 
    We the People… 1:49 
    Examining This 2:23 
   Purposes of Government 4:20 
    Early Draft of the Preamble 4:24 
    Creation of a Federalist System of Government 4:38 
    Establish Justice 5:20 
    Common Defense 5:30 
    General Welfare 5:44 
    Secure the Blessings of Liberty 6:11 
   Forms of Government 6:34 
    Anarchy 6:44 
    Autocracy 7:04 
    Absolute Monarchy 7:20 
    Constitutional Monarchy 7:43 
    Dictatorship 8:28 
    Oligarchy 8:50 
    Aristocracy 9:02 
    Theocracy 9:09 
    Democracy 9:18 
    Direct Democracy 9:38 
    Representative Democracy 11:02 
   British Influence 11:52 
    Magna Carta 11:59 
    Parliament 13:32 
   Enlightenment Philosophers 15:47 
    John Locke 15:52 
    Baron de Montesquieu 17:13 
   Articles of Confederation 17:53 
    Written by the Second Continental Congress 18:01 
    Lasted from 1781-1789 18:07 
    Weak National Government 18:41 
    Each State is Equal with One Vote 19:25 
    9 of 13 States to Pass Law 19:36 
    Amending the Articles 19:51 
   Weakness of the Articles 20:16 
    Congress Could Not Tax 20:21 
    Can't Regulate Interstate Trade or Foreign Commerce 20:44 
    No Executive or Judicial Branch 20:58 
    No Authority to Coin Money 21:23 
    Population of State Not Taken Into Account 21:31 
    9 of 13 to Pass Law 22:07 
    Unanimous Consent to Amend Articles 22:12 
   Virginia Plan (Large State) 22:57 
    Bicameral Legislature 23:10 
    Representation Based on Population 23:57 
    Single Executive 24:34 
    Judges Chosen by Legislative Branch 25:25 
   New Jersey Plan (Small State) 25:40 
    Unicameral Legislature 26:03 
    Representation Equal Among States 26:30 
    Plural Executive 26:38 
    Judges Appointed for Life 27:16 
   Connecticut Compromise (Great Compromise) 27:35 
    Bicameral Legislature 28:30 
    House Elected by the People; Senate Appointed by State 28:52 
    One Executive 29:25 
    Supreme Court Appointed to Life Term 32:41 
   The Big Elephant in the Room 33:17 
    Issue of Slavery 33:30 
    Southern vs. Northern States 34:20 
    Three-Fifths Compromise 35:05 
    Commerce and Slave Trade Compromise 35:53 
   Ratification of the Constitution 36:12 
    Signing the Constitution 36:31 
    Ratify it Before Going Into Effect 36:49 
    Federalists Favored Ratification 37:40 
    Anti-federalists Opposed the Constitution 38:32 
   The Federalist Papers 39:31 
    Defended the New Government 39:35 
    Published Under 'Publius' 39:42 
    Lack of a Bill of Rights 39:59 
    Federalists Supported a Bill of Rights 40:59 
   Example 1 42:26 
   Example 2 45:16 
  The Constitution 45:10
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:21 
   Limited Government 1:48 
    Belief That Government is Not All-Powerful 1:50 
    Enumerated Powers Given to the Federal Government 2:08 
    Bill of Rights Added to Ensure That National Government 2:37 
   Popular Sovereignty 3:37 
    Doctrine Rooted in the Belief That Every Human Being is Sovereign 3:43 
    Not a Coincidence That the Legislative Branch is the First Branch of the Government 3:49 
    Declaration of Independence 3:56 
    'We, the People' in the Preamble Included Everyone 5:02 
    No Mention of Women in the Constitution 5:26 
    Citizens of Each State 5:53 
    What Was Permitted Was Not Necessarily Promoted 6:20 
    Wyoming Extended the Vote to Women 6:36 
   Separation of Powers 7:19 
    Three Branches: Legislative, Executive, Judiciary 7:28 
    If Men Were Angels Government Would Not Be Necessary 8:00 
    Influence of Adam Smith and The Wealth of Nations 8:47 
    Founding Fathers Did Not Want Power Vested in One Person or Group of People 9:35 
    Each Branch Has Exerted More Influence Over Different Periods of Time 10:03 
   Checks and Balances - Congress on President 10:29 
    Each Branch Can Check the Powers of the Others 11:04 
    Congress Can Override a President's Veto 11:20 
    Congress Can Impeach the President 12:08 
    Congress Can Refuse to Approve Presidential Appointment 13:48 
    Congress Can Refuse to Ratify Treaties 14:29 
    Congress Can Mount an Investigation 14:59 
   Checks and Balances - Congress on Judiciary 15:16 
    Congress Can Change the Number and Jurisdiction of the Lower Court 15:25 
    Congress Can Use the Impeachment Powers to Remove a Judge From Office 15:45 
    Congress Can Refuse to Approve a Person Nominated to be a Judge 15:56 
   Checks and Balances - President and Judiciary 16:31 
    President Provides These Checks 16:40 
    Judiciary Has These Checks on Other Branches 20:13 
   Federalism 20:56 
    Government Authority Shared by National and State Governments 21:07 
    Concept of 'Dual Federalism' 22:48 
    United States v. Lopez 1995 23:48 
   Formal Amendment Process 26:19 
    2/3 Vote Through Congress and Ratified by 3/4 of State Legislatures 27:21 
    2/3 Vote Through Congress and Ratified by Special Conventions in 3/4 of the States 27:58 
    National Convention 2/3 Vote and Ratified by 3/4 of State Legislatures 28:53 
    National Convention 2/3 Vote and Ratified by 3/4 of States 29:23 
   Informal Amendment Process 30:18 
    Legislative Actions 30:25 
    Executive Actions 30:47 
    Judicial Interpretation 31:17 
    Custom and Usage 31:29 
   Election of 1800 33:04 
    Political Parties 33:19 
    Aaron Burr and Thomas Jefferson 34:21 
    12th Amendment Added 35:00 
   Marbury v. Madison (1803) 35:22 
    Adams and his Congress Created Several New Judicial Positions 35:27 
    'Midnight Appointments' Were Set for the Secretary of State to Deliver 36:01 
    Marshall Ruled the Portion of the Judiciary Act of 1791 as Unconstitutional 36:50 
    Marshall Established Judicial Review 37:55 
   Example 1 38:20 
   Example 2 40:18 
   Example 3 42:31 
  The Bill of Rights, Part I 59:54
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:13 
   First Amendment - Freedom of Religion 2:22 
    First Amendment 3:19 
    Establishment Clause 4:05 
    Free Exercise Clause 6:26 
   The Establishment Clause 8:04 
    Engel v. Vitale (1962) 8:46 
    Lemon v. Kurtzman (1971) 12:18 
    Lee v. Weisman (1992) and Santa Fe School District v. Doe (2002) 14:30 
   The Free Exercise Clause 16:03 
    Reynolds v. United States (1879) 16:45 
    Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) 18:19 
    Oregon v. Smith (1990) 19:57 
    Government Cannot Unfairly Target Certain Religions 21:31 
   Freedom of Speech 22:11 
    Alien and Sedition Acts 22:40 
    Schenck v. United States (1919) 23:35 
    Tinker v. Des Moines (1969) 25:06 
    Miller v. California (1973) 25:59 
    Texas v. Johnson (1989) 27:50 
   Freedom of Press 29:14 
    Near v. Minnesota (1931) 29:52 
    New York Times v. Sullivan (1964) 30:50 
    New York Times v. United States 31:53 
    Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier (1988) 32:32 
   Freedom of Assembly and petition 34:05 
    Peacefully Assemble and Petition the Government for a Redress of Grievances 34:20 
    Dejon v. Oregon (1937) 34:32 
    Certain Restrictions are Allowed for Facilities 35:09 
    Police May Disperse Demonstrations 35:21 
   Second Amendment 35:41 
    As Passed by Congress 35:53 
    As Ratified by the States 36:54 
    District of Columbia v. Heller (2008) 37:37 
    Review the Five Freedoms Listed in the Bill of Rights 38:37 
   Third Amendment 39:11 
    Third Amendment 39:14 
    Passed In Response to the 1765 Passage of the Quartering Acts 39:48 
    Least Cited Bill of Rights 40:08 
    Agree for the Implicit Right to Privacy 40:19 
   Fourth Amendment 40:55 
    Fourth Amendment 40:58 
    Mapp v. Ohio (1961) 41:34 
    Probable Cause 43:19 
   Fifth Amendment 45:26 
    Fifth Amendment 45:49 
    Right to a Grand Jury 47:20 
    Right Against Double Jeopardy 48:08 
    Right Against Self-Incrimination 49:55 
    Due Process Clause Applies to Deferral Government 52:00 
   Example 1 52:19 
   Example 2 54:15 
   Example 3 55:01 
   Example 4 56:40 
  The Bill of Rights, Part II 34:19
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:18 
   Sixth Amendment - Public and Speedy Trial 2:17 
    Sixth Amendment 2:24 
    Barker v. Wingo (1972) 3:21 
    Sheppard v. Maxwell (1966) 4:24 
    Powell v. Alabama (1932) 5:03 
   Seventh Amendment 5:30 
    Seventh Amendment 5:35 
    Civil cases Are Not Heard in Federal Courts 6:05 
    Never Incorporated and Applied to States 6:15 
    Mystery Surrounding the 'Twenty Dollar' Clause 7:22 
   Eighth Amendment 7:56 
    Eighth Amendment 7:59 
    Inspired by Titus Oates Case 9:10 
    Furman v. Georgia (1972) 10:41 
    Miller v. Alabama (2012) 11:51 
   Ninth Amendment 13:01 
    Ninth Amendment 13:06 
    Roe v. Wade (1973) 13:34 
    Rights in the First Eight Amendments is Not an All-Encompassing List of Rights 14:34 
    Set of Rights Yet to be Discovered That No Constitution Can Specifically List 14:40 
   Tenth Amendment 15:21 
    Tenth Amendment 15:29 
    Commerce Clause Used to Justify the Use of Federal Government 16:13 
    United States v. Lopez 16:30 
   Example 1 19:16 
   Example 2 20:34 
   Example 3 23:08 
   Example 4 26:06 
  Amendments XI - XIX 38:07
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:15 
   Amendment XI 1:40 
    Amendment Eleven 2:01 
    Individual from One State are Prohibited from Suing Another State 2:25 
    States Are Not Immune from Lawsuits Brought by its Own Citizens 2:41 
   Amendment XII 3:05 
    Amendment Twelve 3:38 
    Thomas Jefferson vs. Aaron Burr 6:11 
   Amendment XIII 8:51 
    Amendment Thirteen 9:05 
    Include Peonage, Involuntary Servitude and Forced Labor 10:05 
   Amendment XIV 11:05 
    Amendment Fourteen 11:21 
    Four Clauses of Amendment Fourteen 12:28 
   Amendment XV 15:50 
    Amendment Fifteen 15:54 
    Right to Vote Interrupted by the Supreme Court 16:35 
    Blacks Faced Literacy Tests and Poll Taxes 17:13 
    Ku Klux Klan 18:44 
    Supreme Court Decisions and Passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 18:57 
   Amendment XVI 19:39 
    Amendment Sixteen 19:41 
    Until 1913, Tariffs and Excise Taxes Were the Primary Source of Federal Government Revenue 20:41 
    Direct Income Tax Permitted by the Constitution 21:21 
    Wesley Snipes 22:21 
   Amendment XVII 23:00 
    Amendment Seventeen 23:02 
    State Legislatures have the Power to Grant the Governor the Right to Appoint Senators 23:28 
    Governor Rod Blagojevich Attempted to Sell Obama's Vacated Seat in 2008 24:38 
   Amendment XVIII 26:00 
    Amendment Eighteen 26:04 
    Ban the Sale and Distribution of Alcohol 27:00 
    Organized Crime Increased 27:08 
    Amendment was Repealed Through the 21st Amendment 27:49 
    Drinking Age: 21 28:04 
   Amendment XIX 28:38 
    Amendment Nineteen 28:40 
    Prohibited the Government From Denying Women the Right to Vote 29:04 
    Votes Granted in Wyoming, Utah, and Washington 29:39 
    Argument That the 14th and 15th Amendment Had Already Granted Women Suffrage was Rejected 30:25 
   Example 1 31:50 
   Example 2 32:48 
   Example 3 33:25 
   Example 4 35:48 
  Amendments XX-XXVII 52:17
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:11 
   Amendment XX 1:22 
    Amendment Twenty 1:51 
    Shortened the 'Lame Duck' Status of Both the President and Congress 3:04 
    In Earlier Times, a Long Period of Time Was Necessary for the Long Trek to Washington, DC 3:09 
   Amendment XXII 7:15 
    Amendment Twenty-Two 7:25 
    George Washington Set a Precedent for Two Terms 10:02 
    Few Presidents Sought a Third Term 11:34 
    Lyndon Johnson 13:41 
    President Bill Clinton 14:55 
   Amendment XXIII 16:55 
    Amendment Twenty-Three 17:01 
    Residents of Washington, D.C. Has Right to Vote in Presidential Elections 17:44 
    Electors Give Votes to Democratic Candidate 18:33 
    Nonpartisan Issue 18:56 
    1984: Ronald Reagan Won in a Landslide Election 20:06 
    Michael Jordan Amendment 22:32 
   Amendment XXIV 23:40 
    Amendment Twenty-Four 23:52 
    One of the Surviving Ways to Disenfranchise Black Voters 24:18 
    President Kennedy Wanted an Amendment as the Best Way to Avoid a Filibuster 24:46 
   Amendment XXV 25:52 
    Amendment Twenty-Five 26:01 
    Amendment Made it Unambiguous That the VP Became President 28:38 
   Amendment XXV 29:32 
    Tyler Precedent 29:33 
    Woodrow and Edith Wilson 30:08 
    Presidents Who Take Over Because of a Previous President's Death 31:23 
    Truman 31:51 
    Gerald Ford 32:17 
    Use of Section 4 33:01 
   Amendment XXVI 34:28 
    Amendment Twenty-Six 34:39 
    Vietnam War 34:54 
    Old Enough to Fight and Die, Old Enough to Vote 35:04 
    Some States Already Permitted Ages 18-21 to Vote 35:27 
    Struck Down as Unconstitutional 35:38 
   Amendment XXVII 36:38 
    Amendment Twenty-Seven 37:08 
    Gregory Watson 38:41 
    Thesis Seen as Too Unrealistic 40:04 
    Automatic Cost-of-Living Adjustment 40:45 
   Example 1 41:13 
   Example 2 42:27 
   Example 3 44:59 
   Example 4 46:20 
   Example 5 48:40 

II. Political Participation

  Political Culture 35:57
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:08 
   What is Political Culture? 1:05 
    Set of Basic Values and Beliefs About a Country or Government 1:09 
    In the United States 1:30 
    Our Political Culture Provides the Backdrop for our System of Government 2:00 
   America Democratic Values 2:30 
    Majority Rule / Minority Rights 3:05 
    Equality 4:33 
    Private Property 6:20 
    Individual Freedoms 7:36 
    Compromise 8:53 
    Limited Government 11:10 
   Political Socialization 12:04 
    Process by Which Citizens Acquire a Sense of Political Identity 12:09 
    Family Influence 12:20 
    Schools Teach Patriotism 14:18 
    Demographic Factors 14:53 
    Mass Media 15:06 
   Measuring Public Opinion 15:55 
    Early Polling Data in the U.S. had Self-Selecting Biases 16:01 
    Straw Polls 16:22 
    Used Car Registrations and telephone Directories to Reach People 16:58 
    Modern Polling 17:44 
   Elements of a Successful Poll 18:09 
    Sampling 18:31 
    Prepare Clear and Valid Questions 19:23 
    Control How the Poll is Taken 21:48 
    Analyzing and Reporting Results 22:51 
   1948 Election 23:10 
   2008 and 2012 Election Predictions 25:07 
    Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight.com Blog 25:26 
    2008: Silver Correctly Predicted 49 of 50 States 26:27 
    2012: Silver Correctly Predicted All 50 States 26:59 
    Sabermetrician 27:27 
   Example 1 28:30 
   Example 2 29:54 
   Example 3 31:14 
   Example 4 32:37 
  Political Parties 39:31
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:10 
   What is a Political Party? 2:20 
    Voluntary Associations of People Who Seek to Control the Government 2:23 
    Political Parties Bring People and Government Together 3:47 
    Main Difference Between Interest Groups and Political Parties 4:34 
    Major Goal of a Political Party 5:02 
   Roles of Political Parties 5:51 
    Party in the Electorate 6:09 
    Party in Government 7:48 
    Party in Organization 9:14 
   Party Systems 10:50 
    One-Party System 11:06 
    Two-Party System 11:50 
    Multi-Party System 12:54 
   What Do Political Parties Actually Do? 14:00 
    Recruit Candidates 14:21 
    Nominate and Support Candidates for Office 15:11 
    Educate the Electorate 15:17 
    Organize the Government 15:42 
   Party Identification and Membership 16:35 
    No Money is Required to Associate with a Particular Party 16:47 
    Choices: Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, or None 18:03 
    Factors Influencing Party Identification 18:15 
   Two-Party Tradition in America 22:14 
    Factions 22:19 
    George Washington Never Officially Aligned with One Political Party 22:40 
   Third Parties 26:13 
    Ideological Parties 26:28 
    Splinter Parties 26:48 
    Single Issue Parties 28:28 
    Protest Parties 28:50 
   Successful 3rd Party Candidates 29:28 
    Ross Perot 29:34 
    Received 19% of the National Vote 30:34 
    John Anderson Won 7% of the Popular Vote 31:39 
    Ralph Nader Won 3% of the Popular Vote 32:00 
    Ron Paul Won0.5% of the Popular Vote 32:17 
   Example 1 33:44 
   Example 2 34:29 
   Example 3 36:33 
   Example 4 38:23 
  Elections & Campaigns 57:11
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:09 
   Forms of Political Participation 1:36 
    Voting in Elections 2:31 
    Discussing Politics and Attending Political Meetings 2:39 
    Forming Interest Groups 2:53 
    Contacting Public Officials 3:28 
    Campaigning 4:59 
    Contributing Money 6:34 
    Running for Office 7:06 
    Protesting Government Decisions 7:58 
   Expansion of Suffrage 8:15 
    Suffrage is the Right to Vote 8:19 
    Voting Rights Act of 1965 10:11 
   Low Voter Turnout 12:09 
    Expansion of the Electorate (26th Amendment) 12:16 
    Mistrust of Government and Lack of Perceived Differences Between Candidates 14:02 
    Lack of Political Efficacy 15:10 
    Difficulty of Registration Process 15:28 
   Who Votes? 17:12 
    Education 17:32 
    Age 18:24 
    Gender 19:04 
    Religion 19:35 
    Marital Status 20:05 
    Union or Community Membership 20:17 
    Geography 20:35 
   Types of Elections 21:35 
    Primary Elections 21:41 
    Closed Primary 22:26 
    Open Primary 23:46 
    Blanket Primary 24:20 
    Top-Two Primary 24:42 
   Presidential Elections 27:16 
    Every Four Years 27:21 
    Not Uncommon for the Political Party of the President to Lose Seats 28:25 
   Road to the White House 29:44 
    Exploration 30:06 
    Announcement 32:53 
    Presidential Primaries and Caucus 33:38 
    Nominating Conventions 34:53 
   Running to the Center 39:49 
    Campaigning and the General Election 39:54 
   Choosing a VP Candidate 42:11 
    Balancing the Ticket 42:32 
    1960: John F. Kennedy Chose Lyndon Johnson 42:46 
    1992: Bill Clinton Chose Al Gore 43:24 
    2008: Obama Chose Joe Biden 43:51 
    2012: Romney Chose Paul Ryan 44:47 
   The Electoral College 46:21 
    Each State Has a Number of Electors Equal to its Senators and House Members 46:30 
    Total of 538 Electors Who Vote for the President 46:44 
    Faithless Electors 47:52 
    George Bush Won 271-266 48:00 
   Example 1 50:46 
   Example 2 51:51 
   Example 3 52:30 
   Example 4 53:26 
   Example 5 54:36 
   Example 6 55:29 
  Interest Groups & Mass Media 47:58
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:07 
   Functions of Interest Groups 1:37 
    Factions 1:48 
    Raise Awareness and Stimulate Interest in Public Affairs 3:09 
    Link Between Members and Government 4:27 
    Provide Information to the Government 4:55 
    Provide Channels for Political Participation 5:23 
   Economic Interest Groups 5:59 
    Labor Groups Protect the Interests of Organized Labor 6:18 
    Business Groups Promote Business Interest 6:43 
    Professional Groups Promote Interest of Their Particular Profession 7:15 
   Other Interest Groups 8:05 
   Interest Group Strategies 10:38 
    Influencing Elections 11:09 
    Lobbying 12:36 
    Litigation 13:11 
    Going Public 13:43 
   Political Action Committees 14:35 
    Federal Law Regulates PACS 14:45 
    Individuals Limited to Contributing $5k to PACS 15:04 
    PACS May Contribute $5k to One Candidate per election Cycle 15:34 
    PACS May Make Unlimited Expenditures 16:13 
   Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission 16:51 
    Supreme Court Overturned Sections of the Campaign Reform Act of 2002 17:05 
    Citizens United Wanted to Air Hillary: The Movie 17:45 
    Lower Court Held That It Violated McCain-Feingold's Restriction TV Broadcasts 18:41 
    Supreme Court Agreed It's Unconstitutional to Ban Free Speech 19:12 
   Super PAC 20:06 
    Citizens United and Speechnow.org v. FEC 20:15 
    Independent-Expenditure Only Committees 20:43 
    Not Allowed to Coordinate Directly with Candidates or Political Parties 21:35 
    Restore Our Future vs. Winning Our Future 23:32 
   Mass Media 24:34 
    Communication That Transmit Information to the General Public 24:45 
    Only Linkage Mechanism That Specializes in Communication 24:53 
    Media Roles 26:14 
   Media as Gatekeepers 28:44 
    Media Dictates What Gets News Coverage 28:49 
    Horse Race Journalism 30:07 
    Requirement for Presidential Candidates to Appear on Saturday Night Live 31:45 
   Media and the President 35:01 
    Washington DC has the Largest Press Corps 35:08 
    Access to the President 35:50 
    Some Ways Officials Can Leak Information 36:37 
   Media Bias 38:22 
    Conservative Media Outlets 38:50 
    Liberal Media Outlets 39:12 
    CNN 40:37 
    CSPAN 41:07 
   Example 1 42:17 
   Example 2 44:10 
   Example 3 45:00 
   Example 4 45:49 

III. Institutions of National Government

  Legislative Branch 54:41
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:14 
   Bicameral Legislature 1:33 
    House of Representatives 3:01 
    Senate 6:44 
   Organization of Congress 13:07 
    Two Houses Meet for Two Years 13:14 
    President May Call Special Sessions in Case of National Emergency 14:47 
    Apportionment 15:21 
    Reapportionment 15:28 
    Gerrymandering 16:16 
   Incumbency Effect 17:59 
    Tendency of Those Already Holding Office to Win Reelection 18:09 
    Name Recognition 21:38 
    Casework for Constituents 21:57 
    Franking Privilege 23:16 
   Other Incumbency Advantages 24:02 
    More Visible to Constituents 24:40 
    Fund-Raising Abilities 24:48 
    Experience in Campaigning 26:04 
    Voting Record 26:25 
   2012 House Election: Ed Royce vs. Jay Chen 27:10 
    Ed Royce Defeated Challenger Jay Chen 28:31 
    Republican Registration Advantage and Incumbency 33:38 
   House of Representatives Leadership 37:21 
    Speaker of the House is the Presiding Officer 37:26 
    Majority and Minority Leaders 38:28 
    Whips Helps Floor Leader by Directing Party Members in Voting 40:15 
   Senate Leadership 42:01 
    Vice President is the Presiding Officer of the Senate 42:09 
    President Pro Tempore 43:56 
    Senate Majority Leader and Minority Leader Act as a Spokesperson 44:43 
    Whips 45:24 
    No House Equivalent of Speaker As Individual Senators 45:37 
   Example 1 46:13 
   Example 2 47:09 
   Example 3 48:11 
   Example 4 51:01 
   Example 5 53:42 
  The Legislative Process 56:36
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:10 
   The Committee System 2:11 
    Committee Chairpersons 3:24 
    Standing Committee 5:00 
    Select Committee 6:52 
    Conference Committee 7:51 
   Exclusive Committees 8:51 
    House Committee on Appropriations 9:44 
    Rules Committee 10:23 
    Committee of Ways and Means 11:24 
   Delegate vs. Trustee 12:06 
    Congress as Delegate 12:55 
    Congress as Trustee 14:46 
    Example 17:19 
   Membership Privileges 18:18 
    Allowance for Office and Staff 18:45 
    Travel Allowance 19:27 
    Immunity from Arrest 19:37 
    Immunity from Libel or Slander Suits 21:17 
   Legislative Powers 22:54 
    Expressed Powers 23:07 
    Implied Powers 24:07 
   Non-Legislative Powers 28:16 
    House Selects President 28:18 
    Senate Chooses Vice President 28:51 
    Congress Can Propose Amendments 29:57 
    Impeachment Powers 30:17 
    Senate Approves Presidential Appointments 32:36 
   How a Bill Becomes a Law: House 33:27 
    Bill is Introduced, Numbered, and Assigned to a Committee 33:39 
    Bill is Returned to Committee 34:07 
    If Approved, the Rules Committee Sets Terms of Debate for the Bill 34:16 
    Bill is Debated by the House 34:23 
    Vote's Taken and Sent to Senate if Passed 34:30 
   How a Bill Becomes a Law: Senate 35:12 
    Bill is Introduced, Numbered, and Assigned to a Committee 35:16 
    Bill May be Assigned to a Subcommittee Before Returned to Committee 35:26 
    No Rules Committee Exists in Senate 35:38 
    If Approved 36:42 
    Both House Vote and Then the President Can Sign the Bill 37:31 
   Legislative Tactics 39:33 
    Filibuster Cloture 40:24 
    Pork Barrel Legislation 43:36 
    Logrolling and Riders 44:25 
   Example 1 46:19 
   Example 2 46:49 
   Example 3 48:50 
   Example 4 50:17 
   Example 5 51:39 
  The American Presidency 59:07
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:11 
   Constitutional Origins of the Presidency 0:56 
    Montesquieu and Locke 1:00 
    Debate Over Single vs. Plural Executive 2:03 
    Requirements 2:47 
   Informal Requirements of the Presidency 5:55 
    Political or Military Experience 6:07 
    Married 13:28 
    White Male 14:12 
    Protestant 15:27 
   Term and Succession 17:19 
    Four-Year Term 17:21 
    The Death or Incapacitation of the President 20:34 
    25th Amendment 23:02 
   Impeachment and Removal 24:18 
    Reasons for Impeachment 24:25 
    House Impeaches, Senate Convicts 25:28 
   Executive Powers 26:14 
    Enforces Laws, Treaties, and Court Decisions 26:20 
    Issues Executive Orders to Carry Out Policies 26:28 
    Appoints and Removes Officials 27:36 
    Assumes Emergency Powers 30:31 
    Presides Over the Cabinet and Executive Branch 30:52 
   Legislative Powers 31:02 
    Annual State of the Union Message 31:06 
    Annual Budget Reports 31:41 
    Signs or Vetoes Bills 31:46 
    Proposes legislation and Uses the Power of the Bully Pulpit 32:16 
    Special Session of Congress 32:48 
   Diplomatic and Military Powers 34:06 
    Appoints Ambassadors 34:10 
    Negotiates Treaties 34:51 
    Accords Diplomatic Recognition to Foreign Gov 35:14 
    Receives Foreign Dignitaries 35:30 
    Commander-in-Chief 35:34 
    Final Decision-Making Authority 36:00 
   Judicial and Party Powers 36:38 
    Appoints Members of the Federal Judiciary 36:42 
    Grants Reprieves, Pardons, and Amnesty 37:28 
    Recognized Leader of the Party 40:08 
    Chooses Vice Presidential Nominee 40:52 
    Helps Members Get Elected 41:04 
    Appoints Party Members to Government Positions 42:46 
   Limitations on Presidential Powers 43:12 
    Overriding Presidential Vetoes 43:31 
    Power of the Purse 43:37 
    Power of Impeachment 44:31 
    Approval Powers Over Appointments 44:36 
    War Powers Act 44:44 
    President Lack the Ability to Utilize the Line-Item Veto 46:41 
   Example 1 47:59 
   Example 2 49:18 
   Example 3 49:45 
   Example 4 51:39 
   Example 5 55:27 
  The Presidency & the Bureaucracy 43:51
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:07 
   The Bureaucracy 0:52 
    Cabinet Departments 2:06 
    Independent Executive Agency 3:56 
    Independent Regulatory Agency 4:17 
    Government Corporations 5:20 
   Characteristics of the American Bureaucracy 6:11 
    Political Authority 6:16 
    Main Source of Bureaucratic Power 7:31 
   Influences on Federal Bureaucracy 9:18 
    Executive Influences 9:49 
    Congressional Influences 10:31 
    Iron Triangles 11:44 
   The Executive Office of the President (EOP) 16:12 
    White House Office 18:19 
    National Security Council 19:15 
    Office of Management and Budget 20:04 
   Key Cabinet Departments 21:22 
    State 21:46 
    Treasury 23:48 
    Defense 26:44 
   Other Executive Departments 29:12 
    Interior 29:16 
    Justice 29:24 
    15 Other Departments 29:33 
   Problems with Bureaucracy 34:01 
    Red Tape 34:10 
    Easier to Block Action Than to Take Action 34:51 
    Bureaucrats are Difficult to Fire 35:20 
   Example 1 36:32 
   Example 2 37:18 
   Example 3 38:52 
   Example 4 40:13 
   Example 5 42:31 
  The National Judiciary 45:30
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:07 
   The Federal Court System 1:08 
    Original Jurisdiction 2:25 
    Appellate Jurisdiction 2:59 
    Concurrent Jurisdiction 3:28 
   Structure of the Judicial System 3:51 
    District Courts 4:20 
    Courts of Appeal 5:10 
    Supreme Court 6:15 
   Judicial Selection 6:59 
    No Formal Qualifications 7:02 
    Life Term 8:32 
    Removed Through Impeachment and Conviction 8:47 
    President Consults Senators Prior to Making District Court Appointments 9:07 
   Supreme Court 11:31 
    Party Affiliation 14:48 
    Race, Gender, Religion, Region 16:33 
    Judicial Experience 17:24 
    Graduated from 'Big-Name' School 18:30 
   Current Supreme Court Justices 19:23 
    Chief Justice John Roberts 19:41 
    Antonin Scalia 21:43 
    Anthony Kennedy 21:50 
    Clarence Thomas 22:27 
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg 22:32 
    Stephen Breyer 22:44 
    Samuel J. Alito 22:48 
    Sonia Sotomayor 22:49 
    Elena Kagan 24:32 
   The Supreme Court at Work 25:25 
    Only a Few Hundred Cases are Heard 25:29 
    Rule of 4 28:02 
    Writ of Certiorari 28:22 
   Majority, Concurring, and Dissenting Opinions 30:21 
    Majority Opinion 30:26 
    Concurring Opinion 31:06 
    Dissenting Opinion 31:40 
   Courts as Policymakers 32:59 
    The Warren Court 33:21 
    The Burger Court 34:38 
    The Rehnquist and Roberts Courts 35:40 
   Example 1 36:54 
   Example 2 37:38 
   Example 3 38:26 
   Example 4 40:15 
   Example 5 44:23 

IV. Public Policy

  Public Policy 52:03
   Intro 0:00 
   Lesson Overview 0:10 
   Domestic Policy 2:12 
    Crime Prevention 2:20 
    Education 3:49 
   Obamacare 7:00 
    Affordable Care Act (ACA) 8:56 
    Constitutionality of ACA's Individual Mandate 12:24 
   Social Welfare 14:37 
    Public Attitude Toward Government Involvement Fighting Against Economic Downturns and Poverty 14:46 
    Social Security Act of 1935 16:12 
    Reagan Reduced Benefits and Effectively Used Rhetoric Decrying 'Big Government' 16:43 
    Bill Clinton Ended Welfare As We Know it and Replace AFDC to TANF 17:36 
   Economic Policy 19:29 
    Government Raises Revenue Through a Variety of Taxes 20:35 
    Individual Income Tax 21:33 
    Federal Reserve Board Controls Monetary Policy Through the Federal Open Market Committee 23:31 
    Fed Chairman Exerts a lot of Power in His Ability to Implement Monetary Policy as Opposed to Fiscal Policy 24:29 
   Mandatory and Discretionary Spending 28:30 
    Mandatory Spending 28:46 
    Discretionary Spending 33:54 
   Social Security Reform 34:33 
    Raise Social Security Taxes 35:27 
    Reduce Benefits to Current Retirees 37:23 
    Raise the Retirement Age 39:24 
   The Federal Budget 41:29 
    Fiscal Year 41:38 
    Office of Management and Budget 41:47 
    Congress Debates with the Congressional Budget Office Providing Economic Data 42:40 
    Congress Sends Appropriations Bills for Approval 43:19 
    If No Budget, Government Shuts Down 43:51 
   Example 1 44:56 
   Example 2 46:04 
   Example 3 46:38 
   Example 4 48:48 
   Example 5 50:16 

V. AP Test

  AP Practice Exam: Free Response, 2012 50:53
   Intro 0:00 
   Free Response 1 0:11 
   Free Response 2 12:01 
   Free Response 3 25:10 
   Free Response 4 40:04 
  AP Practice Exam: Free Response, 2013 42:41
   Intro 0:00 
   Free Response 1 0:11 
   Free Response 2 12:45 
   Free Response 3 22:09 
   Free Response 4 31:46 
  AP Practice Exam: Multiple Choice 59:31
   Intro 0:00 
   Multiple Choice 1 0:19 
   Multiple Choice 2 2:50 
   Multiple Choice 3 5:44 
   Multiple Choice 4 6:59 
   Multiple Choice 5 8:41 
   Multiple Choice 6 10:35 
   Multiple Choice 7 14:18 
   Multiple Choice 8 15:54 
   Multiple Choice 9 22:46 
   Multiple Choice 10 22:45 
   Multiple Choice 11 28:08 
   Multiple Choice 12 29:48 
   Multiple Choice 13 33:31 
   Multiple Choice 14 34:58 
   Multiple Choice 15 36:51 
   Multiple Choice 16 38:52 
   Multiple Choice 17 42:13 
   Multiple Choice 18 43:51 
   Multiple Choice 19 47:52 
   Multiple Choice 20 49:51 
   Multiple Choice 21 52:14 
   Multiple Choice 22 53:49 
   Multiple Choice 23 56:28 
   Multiple Choice 24 57:02 
   Multiple Choice 25 57:53 
  1999 Released AP Practice Exam: Full-Length Multiple Choice, Part I 1:02:04
   Intro 0:00 
   Multiple Choice 1 0:19 
   Multiple Choice 2 2:16 
   Multiple Choice 3 5:22 
   Multiple Choice 4 7:16 
   Multiple Choice 5 12:15 
   Multiple Choice 6 14:58 
   Multiple Choice 7 16:53 
   Multiple Choice 8 18:35 
   Multiple Choice 9 20:02 
   Multiple Choice 10 22:51 
   Multiple Choice 11 24:14 
   Multiple Choice 12 25:06 
   Multiple Choice 13 29:07 
   Multiple Choice 14 30:48 
   Multiple Choice 15 32:32 
   Multiple Choice 16 34:07 
   Multiple Choice 17 36:38 
   Multiple Choice 18 37:40 
   Multiple Choice 19 39:08 
   Multiple Choice 20 40:55 
   Multiple Choice 21 42:58 
   Multiple Choice 22 43:43 
   Multiple Choice 23 45:47 
   Multiple Choice 24 46:38 
   Multiple Choice 25 49:26 
   Multiple Choice 26 51:33 
   Multiple Choice 27 53:49 
   Multiple Choice 28 55:00 
   Multiple Choice 29 57:06 
   Multiple Choice 30 59:54 
  1999 Released AP Practice Exam: Full-Length Multiple Choice, Part II 53:11
   Intro 0:00 
   Multiple Choice 31 0:14 
   Multiple Choice 32 2:00 
   Multiple Choice 33 3:10 
   Multiple Choice 34 4:39 
   Multiple Choice 35 7:26 
   Multiple Choice 36 9:05 
   Multiple Choice 37 10:42 
   Multiple Choice 38 12:16 
   Multiple Choice 39 14:03 
   Multiple Choice 40 15:18 
   Multiple Choice 41 17:06 
   Multiple Choice 42 18:36 
   Multiple Choice 43 20:45 
   Multiple Choice 44 22:01 
   Multiple Choice 45 23:46 
   Multiple Choice 46 24:40 
   Multiple Choice 47 25:49 
   Multiple Choice 48 27:18 
   Multiple Choice 49 28:57 
   Multiple Choice 50 30:57 
   Multiple Choice 51 33:13 
   Multiple Choice 52 35:16 
   Multiple Choice 53 37:13 
   Multiple Choice 54 38:48 
   Multiple Choice 55 40:54 
   Multiple Choice 56 42:13 
   Multiple Choice 57 44:03 
   Multiple Choice 58 46:25 
   Multiple Choice 59 47:58 
   Multiple Choice 60 49:52 

Duration: 17 hours, 17 minutes

Number of Lessons: 21

This course is perfect for high school students preparing for the AP United States Government. Professor Jibin explains all topics with real world examples and finishes the course working through a previous AP exam.

Additional Features:

  • Free Sample Lessons
  • Downloadable Lecture Slides
  • Instructor Comments

Topics Include:

  • US Constitution
  • Bill of Rights
  • Elections & Campaigns
  • Branches of Government
  • American Presidency
  • Public Policy
  • AP Exam Walkthrough

Professor Park received his M.A. in Education and B.A. in Economics & Government from Claremont McKenna College. He also currently teaches AP Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and US Government. Professor Park has also been an AP test grader for 6+ years.

Student Testimonials:

“Professor Park, I just have to say that you truly know your stuff when it comes to the AP U.S. Government exam. It was easy for me because the multiple choice was so close to your lectures it was scary. All of your key concepts and definitions were on there and there were at least 15-20 I felt like your course allowed me to ace. The FRQ's were also very easy for me after going through your constitutional underpinnings lectures and your emphasis of the amendments. I am just in awe how much your course helped me and I only used it for 3 days, a kid who used it for an entire semester would be hard-pressed not to get a 5 on this exam. It is a great feeling when people are bemoaning how hard the test was (especially the multiple choice and you know you got less than 5 wrong). Honestly, can't thank you enough. This course has to be the best on Educator in terms of accuracy to the actual AP exam.” — Angela P.